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Parts of your brain can be asleep while you're awake

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by twilyth, May 26, 2011.

  1. twilyth Guest

    OK, full disclosure, the study was done on rats, but they observed that parts of the rat's brain could be asleep while the rat appeared conscious. However in tasks involving the sleeping part of the brain, the otherwise awake rats usually failed.

    article

  2. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    I guess it's bedtime for me then!
  3. micropage7

    micropage7

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    interesting, how we never realize that it sleep for a while when we are wake up
  4. LifeOnMars

    LifeOnMars New Member

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    Isn't this related to "Deja Vu" or did I already say that?
  5. slyfox2151

    slyfox2151

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    no its not related at all.
  6. Funtoss

    Funtoss New Member

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    how can this beeee!!!? lol does this relate to zombies as well? :) if it does then i think my partner is a zombie.. *hope she doesnt read this :L
  7. LifeOnMars

    LifeOnMars New Member

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    That's wonderful, thank you.
  8. tpupokey New Member

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    This isn't really new though is it? It's long been known that, for example, dolphins switch off parts of their brains in sequence in order to get sleep while remaining active (they in essence never really have to sleep).

    I wouldn't be at all surprised if this translated to humans in part at least.

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