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Plextor NGFF SSD Belts Out Up To 700 MB/s Transfer Rates

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Mar 12, 2013.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    In addition to its 2.5-inch SATA 6 Gb/s TLC NAND flash SSD, Plextor showed off its upcoming SSD in the NGFF form-factor, designed for next-generation Ultrabooks. Based on the same Marvell 88SS9189 processor and triple-level cell (TLC) NAND flash memory as its 2.5-inch cousin, the drive differs in being a 42 x 22 mm (LxW) NGFF module, with PCI-Express 2.0 x2 interface. The drives will be sold in 128 GB and 256 GB capacities, featuring 256 MB and 512 MB DDR3 DRAM caches, respectively. On offer are read speeds of up to 700 MB/s, writes of up to 550 MB/s, and maximum 4K random write performance of 100,000 IOPS. The NGFF drives should arrive around the same time as Ultrabooks based on 4th generation Core "Haswell" processors.

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  2. boogerlad

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    I see two pieces of nand and a ram chip. I really hope that the 88ss9189 is pci-e native, but I doubt it. I also don't think that there exists a sata->pci-e device, due to the small pcb size and the transfer rates > sataIII, so I don't know what to think anymore =P

    Either way, good progression in terms of performance density.

    EDIT: apparently, it's the 88ss9183
  3. 63jax

    63jax

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    700 MB read and 550 MB write on an non Raid solution? that pretty quick:rockout:
  4. Jorge

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    The benchmark numbers are under ideal, not practical operating conditions. No one can tell the difference between a benchmark score of 700 MB read and 500 MB read in actual practice. While it's nice to see SSDs evolving, for the most part it's just marketing hype.
  5. nickbaldwin86

    nickbaldwin86

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    Marketing hype????? :laugh: :rolleyes:

    You don't know performance then bud. or have never been on a drive like this?

    I had a fast Corsair SSD and I wanted faster, I got another one, RAID-0 and WOW it was night and day difference, boot-up, game loads, program loads, installs, name it and it was faster...

    sure browsing the web was the same :rolleyes:
  6. Fierce Guppy

    Fierce Guppy

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    Just one of those would make a very nice 60fps HD game recording drive.
  7. Jorge

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    Actually I have owned Plextor hardware for years including their latest M5P and as I said, you can not tell the difference between 700 MB and 500 MB in real world use because you never see those rates on these SSDs.

    FYI- SSD RAID is not the same as just changing from a 500 MB "rated" SSD to a 700 MB "rated" SSD.

    Benchmarks are a reference point but do not represent actual performance as more and more hardware makers are using as disclaimers in small print with their marketing hype. Competent PC Hardware reviewers will tell you that the benches don't represent real world performance and that the benchmarking is on new, empty drives. If you wanna believe the hype, you're the guy they write this stuff for.
  8. tokyoduong

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    Unless running benchmarks or doing something intensive requiring a lot of transfers, I cannot tell the difference between a 500mb/s SSD and a 300mb/s SSD. In general use, there's just not much difference.

    In gaming, I tested Vertex3 vs the latest Velociraptor and besides a few secs in load times there's no difference in experience. I say that because even with just the velociraptor, I'm almost always the first to finish loading. If someone has SSD and beats me, I still have to wait for other people to load. If it's a game where you can just jump in then connection time is longer than load time. I run my games from the HD and run/record fraps from the SSD with no problems.

    So far SSD is best for general use and saw the most benefit in booting times, installs, uninstalls, high random and IO stuff.
  9. Jizzler

    Jizzler

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    Nice, but needs more giggage! Intel promised me that NGFF would initially max at 512GB.

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