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Powerline Networking - secure?

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by suraswami, Oct 4, 2011.

  1. suraswami

    suraswami

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    Wireless networking is weak in my new bigger home. I wanted to wire the whole house with network cables but its going to be pain hiding those cables (the home is not so new so no built-in network outlets) or need to fish the cables thru the dry wall which I haven't done but I am guessing its a pain too.

    So my option is to use Powerline Networking.

    TRENDnet TPL-303E2K Powerline AV Adapter Kit Up to 200Mbps

    TRENDnet TPL-303E2K Powerline AV Adapter Kit Up to...

    seems to be a cheap effective solution.

    Question is security and voltage spikes (if any). How secure is it? Since it is connected to the powerline is the data going accross only in my home line or my neighbour is also going to see and try to crack the password? (home is a condomonium, so not sure how the wiring is).

    Wanted to try out powerline networking option but as always need the advice from my friends here.

    My current Wireless router is old but trusty Linksys WRT54GL, no open-source or no custom firmware.

    Should I just replace the router with a better newer router? This ASUS RT-N12 has good reviews, is it worth a try?

    ASUS RT-N12 Wireless Broadband Router SuperSpeedN ...

    :toast:
     
  2. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    The connection between the power line units is encrypted with 128-bit AES encryption. So it is pretty much as secure as WPA2 on WiFi. So no need to worry about your neighbors getting on your network.
     
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  3. suraswami

    suraswami

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    thats good. how many such devices i can connect before i start to see slowness?
     
  4. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    The max I would recommend is 4 to 5, the ones you linked to limit you to 8 some limit you to 15, but with only a 200Mb/s bandwidth pool to share between them I'd stick to 5 or less. But it depends on what you are using them for. If you are just using them to connect to the net and browse and email and stuff, then I could see 8 working just fine. If you are doing heaving media streaming to the different devices on the network, or file sharing, or heavy downloading then 4-5 would be the maximum I would say.
     
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  5. suraswami

    suraswami

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    main use - online class with good HD quality webcam, media streaming, netflix HD streaming, Backps and ofcourse general browsing.

    I have ordered 2 sets. Should I connect one to the router and 1 in each room where I want internet?
     
  6. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    you should read the directions. setting up PLC is quite easy depending on the kit. also note, performance varies immensely from house to house. the age of the wiring, electrical noise and distance between the units are major factors. you will want to spend some time playing around with them in different sockets to see which perform the best. if you got ones with IEEE 1901 then the odds are more favorable as they introduce some pretty sophisticated OFDM technology.
     
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  7. JrRacinFan

    JrRacinFan Served 5k and counting ...

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    suraswami says thanks.
  8. suraswami

    suraswami

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    Not a mansion, but only a 3 bedroom 1425 sq ft condo.

    Can u explain how a range extender work?
     
  9. bogmali

    bogmali Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, you connect one to your router and the others where you want internet connectivity.

    Had my Netgear kits for 2 years now and they work great. Have 2 heavy streamers (Xbox360 and HTPC) and the rest are casual browsing. House was built in 2005 so the wiring is still pretty good.
     
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  10. JrRacinFan

    JrRacinFan Served 5k and counting ...

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    Easiest way to explain what that does, it takes your existing WITHIN RANGE signal extends the wireless signal and provides network access to the 4 ports. Mind you it works best on an existing wireless N network.
     
  11. suraswami

    suraswami

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    what about power surge?
     
  12. JrRacinFan

    JrRacinFan Served 5k and counting ...

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    What you mean? a spike in power? Just like any electronics a spike in power could be deadly for them.
     
  13. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    almost every model will say to avoid using it on a power strip as it may cause noise or garble the signal.
     
  14. suraswami

    suraswami

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    all my devices are connected either to a UPS or a power surge protector. If this little thing fries I am not that worried but will it send the power spike to the PC thru the network cable?
     
  15. robal

    robal

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    I'm probably going to repeat other people's advice but:

    You'll be surprised by how greatly 802.11n improved over 802.11g.
    You can get 2 or 3 APs to cover even huge house with reinforced-concrete walls, and get decent speed/latency.

    Cheers,
     
  16. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    anything is possible. you can always test it out on a powerstrip first to see if there is any interference you can or cannot deal with.
     
  17. suraswami

    suraswami

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    I ordered it to pickup from local MC, will try it out tonight and post my findings.
     
  18. westom

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    Your existing router should be more than sufficient. Solve the problem. For example, from the computer, look at the router like Superman with X-ray vision. You will see right through wood and sheetrock. Items such as metal air ducts will block your vision. Your computer antenna and router antenna must be located so that Superman can look through walls and see the router.

    Remember, the antenna does not direct signals in its pointed direction. All signals propagate perpendicular from an antenna. A vertical antenna means all signals are in a horizontal plane. And near zero signals directed upstairs.

    Better computer manufacturers provide utilities to view signal strength in dBs. Five bars is a useless tool for measuring signal strength. If your computer manufacturer is not so helpful, then get 3rd party software such as Netstumbler. Displays dB numbers for all nearby Wifi access points. Use those numbers to orient the antenna and to 'see through walls like Superman'. You should have at least -60 dBs all through that condo. -80 dBs means something is obstructing 'Superman's vision'.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2011
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  19. DanTheBanjoman SeƱor Moderator

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    In my experience, just the 2. I've never seen powerline equipment perform well.
     
  20. suraswami

    suraswami

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    I hardly get 2 MB/s with powerline device and it freezes my keyboard and mouse when I transfer large files to and from the server. When I put the device on a different room and connect, I get around 3 MB/s and keyboard and mouse is working. Strange!

    My wireless get me 2.5 MB/s transfer speed. hmm wireless is still good?
     
  21. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    that's too bad. have you tried plugging directly into the wall. it is highly recommended you dont attach them to a powerstrip or surge protector. the ones i got work very well from opposite sides of the house.

    TRENDnet TPL-401E2K Powerline AV Adapter Kit Up to...
     
  22. suraswami

    suraswami

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    Its plugged directly to the wall power socket.

    I get about 2 MB/s meaning 20 Mbps which is what a poor wireless connection can achieve.

    The device that I got is rated for 200 Mbps (theoretical) but I hardly get 10% of it. That sucks.

    Going to return all these and get a better router and wireless adapters.
     
  23. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    yea, the latest ones with IEEE 1901 do much better. 200mbps is on the physical layer, which means really it is 100mbps on the transport layer after all of the fancy OFDM stuff happens. and even that 100mbps only happens in a lab under the most perfect conditions. the same with wireless.
     
  24. suraswami

    suraswami

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    I am going to get this trusty Rosewill USB wireless adapter and be done with it for now.

    Rosewill RNX-G1 Wireless Black Dongle w/ External ...

    Already have 2 of these and they work great and good speed. Need one more for the problem pc and hopefully I can wire the whole home later.
     
  25. Xiphos

    Xiphos New Member

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    when you were using those powerline adapters, was there any connection drops at all?

    I am considering going with powerline, speed is not my biggest concern, since my internet connection is only 12 mbps. but sometimes my connections would be dropped and it irritates me a lot. granted its only 3-4 times a month, but its still a bother.
     

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