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Question on flashing BIOS

Discussion in 'Motherboards & Memory' started by the_professor, Nov 2, 2008.

  1. the_professor New Member

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    I've read that some motherboards require an older CPU in order to update their BIOS so that a new CPU can be used. Is this a necessity? (I don't have an older (compatible) CPU.)

    The two components in question at the moment...

    CPU:
    AMD Phenom X4 9950.

    Motherboard:
    ASUS M3N-HT Deluxe/HDMI.
  2. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    isnt the cpu compatible already? if it boots with it and your sure its stable enough to not restart or do anything stupid! then go ahead with the bois update, i think it would be alright :)
  3. the_professor New Member

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    Yep. :) It's compatible, thankfully... that is, if you mean the 9950 will work with the M3N-HT Deluxe. What I'm not sure about stemmed from a previous mobo I read about, people in newegg's comments and pros/cons section were saying you need an older (or at least a non quad or something) AMD CPU if you want to be able to flash the mainboard's BIOS. They were saying that the mainboard wouldn't even recognize the 9950. My M3N and 9950 haven't arrived yet (should on Monday or Tuesday), though I'm hoping to get a head start on that so I'm prepared. :)
  4. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    If its compatible already why would you wana flash bios?, i have a 6400+ and that flash's bios just fine, via live update or downloaded bios file (which i preffer! for obvious reasons, lol)

    besides, do you think the mobo/cpu maker's could really get away with selling something whats state of the art. but yet need something old to update it. it wouldn't make sense, lol.
  5. the_professor New Member

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    Very good point. :) It has apparently been a problem, though, between some mobos & cpus that were compatible but the mobo bios was old enough (even though the mobo was fairly new) to not recognize the new model cpu. I'm just hoping that doesn't happen in my case.

    I'm guessing there are advantages to updating a bios as a default step in building a computer (or installing a new motherboard).

    My #1 hope is that I don't have one of those fluke combo mobo+cpu pairings that requires an older cpu to flash the mobo to recognize the new cpu. lol

    My #2 intention re: bios is to know how to flash it... what's a nice and easy way to do update it?
  6. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    use the tool what comes on the utility disc, let that find the correct bios for your board, depending on how new it is, there might not even be a new bios for it yet, and as i said before you can either use the live update method, which i dont recommed due to you bein f*cked if your net cuts off while updating, the best way is download the file using the tool and it will rewrite the new bios for you, its almost like copy and paste nowdays :D.
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2008
  7. Fastmix

    Fastmix New Member

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    The one you are talking about is some older mb that did not support x4 to start with but could with a bios update, in that case you need it an x2 to flash because the mb did not recognize the x4 until the new bios was flashed.

    If your does recognize the x4 than you are good to go.
  8. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    Just looked on the ASUS website, that mobo fully supports that cpu, so you haven't got a worry, you've not got a BE have you? cause i belive they don't come with a HSF, and have you got some thermal paste?
  9. the_professor New Member

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    If the internet cuts out in the middle of a 'live update' will the motherboard basically "die", henceforth becoming known as an expensive paperweight? :eek::twitch:
  10. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    haha, something like that i belive, im not 100% on how it works.
  11. the_professor New Member

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    I purhcased the 125W, which apparently does come with heatsink+fan, though I'm not using their hsf anyway. ;) I purchased a separate one... and AS5 (and paste remover). :D "Pea-sized" drop, they say, some say don't spread it, some say do spread it... I'll probably spread it, vehwee carefuhwee. ;)
  12. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    Send me your stock HSF then :p, i could cook an egg on mine... if it was level enough, lol

    i spread it myself, usually a credit card or something like that is really good to even it out :)
  13. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    what system are you running on now? you should post your system specs in the bit where it appears on the left just below the avators, lol
  14. the_professor New Member

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    I'll update with sys specs soon ;) I'm waiting for all my computer "guts" to arrive so I can piece it together and call it my baby (well, my computer baby, that is). At the moment I'm using a toshiba laptop with an intel core 2 duo, it's not bad for a laptop (though this specific model is very bad for gaming).

    My stock hsf will probably go into another computer I build (a cheaper computer). :) Though I might use it as a paperweight instead. heheh

    I'm hoping I don't have to return any parts (hoping to not get any DOA for example).

    You have a cool system, by the way. :pimp: THough is it good or badif you can cook an egg on it? :p


    EDIT:
    I'm running Linux. :)
  15. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    Linux... how do i go about using that? something i've never really looked into but it interests me :)

    and its a good thing if im hungry, lol, but at the moment i have it under volted to 1.350v rather than 1.400, and at idle it runs at 40 - 45 degrees, at stock volts it runs at 55+ :(.
  16. the_professor New Member

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    How you are introduced to the *nix world depends on what kind of first impression you want.

    Do you want something as easy as Windows and Mac? Consider Ubuntu. :)
    Do you want the most unix-like linux (that requires some brains)? Consider Slackware. :)
    Do you want a totally wicked-cool linux (that also requires some brains)? Consider Gentoo. :)
    Do you want some serious unix (not linux)? Consider a BSD or SysV system. :)
    Do you want BSD? Consider OpenBSD. :)
    Do you want SysV? Consider Solaris. :)

    My favorite is unix (bsd or sysv)... I'm only using linux right now because it's "more ideal" for audio recording ;) though I still enjoy it quite a bit. I'm using Ubuntu Studio (I don't like the default Ubuntu, too "blah"... the "Studio" version is sexy). :D However, I will be switching to "64 Studio" linux when I build my 64-bit computer, only for use with audio/music recording. I'll use Solaris 10 (unix) as my primary system. I'll use WinVista64-bit as my gaming system. (And I'll have OpenBSD and some Linux partitions for fun... I'm an OS nut, I like 'em all.)

    Anyway back on topic... would I be better off flashing BIOS via a USB stick?
  17. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    you've lost me there pal, lol

    but basically something easy and looks better than windows, not ubuntu, cant get the graphics driver to load at all for my mobo :( the ubuntu and beryl effects look more than impressive though :D.
  18. the_professor New Member

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    :)

    Unix = BSD and SysV.
    Linux = Debian, Red Hat, Slackware, Gentoo, etc. (technically, they're "GNU/Linux")

    Unix = Uniplexed Information and Computing System (originally UNICS, though altered to UNIX), it is also a pun on MULTICS, a predecessor.

    Linux = Linus' MINIX (minix is a "mini" version and derivative of unix), or Linux Torvald's Unix, or Linux Is Not Unix.

    GNU = GNU's Not Unix.

    Linux, alone, is just a kernel... Linux is not an operating system... until you add GNU. The GNU applications, alone, aren't an OS, lol... they require a kernel, henceforth Linux.

    Unix is an OS. It's the whole package.

    BSD (Berkeley Software Division) and SysV (System 5/System V) are the main 2 kinds of unix at present. There are others, though those 2 are the main ones. BSD consists of several "flavors", such as OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, and more. SysV consists pretty much of just Solaris.

    Red Hat and Debian used to be 2 of the main "distros" of linux. There are now several derivatives of Red Hat and several derivatives of Debian. There are also Linux systems independent of RH and Deb... Slackware and Gentoo, for example, are each their own stand-alone Linux systems. There are more. Many many more.

    If you are interested in learning a *nix system in the truest form, put linux aside temporarily and start with unix. You can still learn some great things from linux (without all the GUI (graphic user interface, aka the "windows" environment)), just like you can in unix, via doing nothing but the CLI (command line interface).

    If you are interested in learning a *nix system via GUI, you can use either unix or linux - they are both now posix compliant such that they can crossplatform almost any apps from almost any system.

    You mentioned an interest in something that is easy, looks better than windows, but is not ubuntu.

    You might consider Vector (or "VectorLinux" or "Vector Linux"). It is a derivative of Slackware. Although Slackware is not the easiest or most user-friendly system, Vector is very easy to use. There is also a multimedia package available with Vector that might work well with your graphics.

    http://vectorlinux.com/

    I'm not using Vector right now, though have in the past and was impressed with it.

    Remember also that the default look and feel of any linux/unix system is not your only choice. You have several WMs (window managers) and DEs (desktop environments) to choose from, some even mimic Windows.

    Beryl (or Compiz) is actually not an Ubuntu thing ;) ...it's used in all of the *nix systems... though it is a beauty. I'm using it right now.

    You can also run a LiveCD to get a feel for a linux/unix system. Those work by finding the ISO (CD) file on their website, burning it to CD (be sure to use the ISO feature in your burning software), putting the CD in your CD drive, and booting the computer off of the CD. This is a completely safe way to those test operating systems - it does absolutely nothing to your current operating system/programs/files/etc. - and it is a great way to see what other systems are like.

    Once you find a linux or unix that you like you can install it. Most of the systems are very easy to install these days, as they provide easy user-friendly step-by-step "click of the mouse" type interactive install instructions.

    Okay, enough *nix... my question... ;) Are there step-by-step instructions on updating mobo BIOS? :)
    mc-dexter says thanks.
  19. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    hmmm first of, sorry my answer int guna be no where near as long as yours, lol, but basically, you wont need step by step instructions, once you install the utility for the bios update tool, then you will clearly see, i think every mobo supports the function for ease of use, if you let me know monday when you get your parts i'll be more than willing to help out, step by step if need be, although like i say, i doubt you will need them.
  20. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    oh yeh, back to linux, will my wireless pci card still work, and other things, should i consider the 64bit?

    n im guna av to wait till monday at least before i can get it as im using some neighbours internet n its a crappy connection, so no good for big downloads :(
  21. the_professor New Member

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    64-bit *nix is cool, so is 32-bit. :) I'm going to be running 64-bit *nix (and 64-bit vista) w/ the new computer, though I may occasionally install a temporary 32-bit system on the 64-bit computer.

    Wireless is hit-and-miss with *nix. Which wireless card do you have? If there is not already a reverse-engineered wireless driver, you might consider the "ndis-wrapper", an app that lets you use most wireless cards within *nix.

    BIOS updates - cool! I have a hunch the M3N-etc.etc. will have that automatic feature. That'll be cool. :)

    I actually think I might be receiving my CPU as one of the last shipments! lol . . . so I'll basically have to wait for everything to come in before I can start piecing it together. No biggy.
  22. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    your mobo will have that function for sure, my mobo has, shes not showing her age yet but shes gettin on some, lol. oh so sounds of it, it dont matter with linux about 32 + 64bit OS's, cuz 64bit XP wont take my wireless drivers either :(, and my wireless card maker is "Marvell". im off to bed now tho, i'll be on tomorrow as usual, lol.
  23. the_professor New Member

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    I'm not familiar with Marvell... though a quick online search brought up that it has probs in *nix. I'm guessing somebody out there has it working. That's odd that it doesn't work in 64-bit V... oh, you said 64-bit XP. I've never used XP 64-bit, dunno. :confused:

    There are some cases where 32-bit is easier than 64-bit due to the present day computer programs favoring 32-bit, at least by majority. Perhaps this is true of any operating system. Usually, though, in *nix if you hit a brick wall with 64-bit, there are work-arounds to get the apps working. A little digging online generally brings up the solutions.

    There's another linux, someone mentioned in another thread, you might try out:

    Linux Mint.

    It has a nice look... I would consider replacing the "gnome" environment with something else.

    If you want a look that is cooler than Windows or Ubuntu (which uses "gnome" for their look/style by default), then you might consider getting any linux distribution of your choice and replacing the default WM or DE with "Enlightenment"... or perhaps even "fluxbox"... or "xfce". Those are 3 favs of mine, and they put other styles/themes to shame (including windows xp and vista). I, personally, think they're cooler than the 2 most popular DEs (which are GNOME and KDE). Fluxbox and xfce are both light on the computer, don't use much; Enlightenment uses a little more of the computer's brain/muscles, though is still lighter than gnome and kde... though... fluxbox, xfce, and enlightenment are also WMs, which are generally more light-weight than DEs.

    A window manager is pretty much just the windows/menus that you can use to access files, etc.
    A desktop environment includes the window manager and a few or several applications, such as the basic calculator, paint-like app, default basic games, etc.

    ANyway, I"ll try updating mobo bios via the goodies that come with my asus. :)
  24. mc-dexter

    mc-dexter New Member

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    you noticed that we got this thread all to our selfs? haha.

    and either of those should run fine on my onboard graphics?, anyways this time, im going to bed for sure, haha

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