1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

Rambus Introduces Memory Controller Interface Solution for DDR3 DRAM

Discussion in 'News' started by malware, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. malware New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2004
    Messages:
    5,476 (1.55/day)
    Thanks Received:
    956
    Location:
    Bulgaria
    Rambus Inc., one of the world's premier technology licensing companies specializing in high-speed memory architectures, today announced the introduction of its memory controller interface solution for industry-standard DDR3 DRAM. The fully integrated hard macro cell provides the physical layer (PHY) interface between the controller logic and DDR3 or DDR2 DRAM devices for data rates of up to 1600MHz.

    Optimized for low power and reduced silicon area, the Rambus DDR3 memory controller interface cell is designed to accommodate a broad range of applications including PC main memory, consumer electronics, servers, workstations, and network communications. To serve these applications, Rambus has architected and developed a DDR3 memory controller interface macro-cell that engineers can seamlessly integrate into their customer owned tooling (COT) or application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip.

    "As signaling frequencies of mainstream DDR DRAMs continue to increase, the memory interfaces critical to system performance have become very challenging to design," said Martin Scott, senior vice president of engineering at Rambus Inc. "Using our extensive signal integrity experience, we have architected a low-risk, highly optimized DDR3 memory controller interface that meets the performance requirements of both main memory and consumer applications."

    To ensure first-silicon success, a reliable system environment for high-volume production, and rapid in-system qualification, the Rambus DDR3 interface solution incorporates Rambus innovations such as:
    • FlexPhase timing adjustment circuits for precise on-chip data alignment with the clock
    • Calibrated output drivers
    • On-die termination
    • LabStation software environment for bring-up, characterization and validation of the DDR3 interface in the end-user application
    Other key interface features include:
    • 800 to 1600MHz data rates
    • Support for DDR3 and DDR2 signaling modes
    • On-chip phase-locked loop (PLL)
    • On-chip delay-locked loop (DLL)
    • Levelization support for fly-by command and address architecture
    • Rambus FlexPhase based in-PHY module that provides characterization and testing capability in the production system
    • Multi-drop bus and multi-rank module support for large capacity systems
    • Variable data bit-widths (8-, 16-, 32-, and 64-bit) with optional ECC support
    Rambus DDR cells are supported by comprehensive system design and integration services that include a complete set of design models and integration tools, including GDSII database, timing models, layout verification netlists, gate-level models, place-and-route outline, and placement guidelines. Package design and system board layout services are also available. For more information about the Rambus DDR3 memory controller interface please visit www.rambus.com/ddr.

    Source: Rambus
  2. Sasqui

    Sasqui

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    7,430 (2.37/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,270
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    Rambus is back in the news ;)

    Whoever wrote that press release isn't particularly tech savvy - 1600MHz is a frequency, not a data rate.
  3. WarEagleAU

    WarEagleAU Bird of Prey

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    10,796 (3.69/day)
    Thanks Received:
    545
    Location:
    Gurley, AL
    Yeah, I was thinking the same thing. Its nice to know that seeing as their RDRAM was a horrid idea, their technological prowess isnt going unnoticed. They have made several strides in memory development making ddr2 and ddr3 alot better than they were before. Also, I Think Sony and someone else is partnering up with them on XDR?
  4. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,553 (2.85/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,383
    How was RDRAM a horrid idea? It was far superior to PC133, the move to the lower end segment of the market was a logical step. That's where it went wrong, mainly due to the price.
  5. DaMulta

    DaMulta My stars went supernova

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    16,117 (5.56/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,454
    Location:
    Oklahoma T-Town
    From what I have been told.
    It went wrong when they filed the patents against other companies that where helping to make RDRAM. They also don't make any ram what I understand. They only hold the patents against it.
  6. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,553 (2.85/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,383
    They live from patents actually. However if the modules were cheaper we might have used RD3 RAM currently instead of DDR3.
  7. Jizzler

    Jizzler

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    3,392 (1.34/day)
    Thanks Received:
    633
    Location:
    Geneva, FL, USA
    RDRAM by itself, not so bad. But the i820 and i840 didn't help it gain acceptance at all. Poor showing in benchmarks vs. the price. Left a bad taste in everyone's mouth that carried over to the i850 and i860.

    Seems like RDRAM is doing well in other markets, like game consoles. IIRC the more RDRAM you had, the higher the latency, so it should perform great in a console which only needs double-digit MB. I'm also assuming that consoles are designed around RDRAM's capabilities, unlike the i840 which had dual channel RD paired with the meager 133Mhz bus of the P3.

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page