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RE:XT800PRO, how to is too hot?

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by helicfi, Nov 11, 2004.

  1. helicfi New Member

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    Ok, I ran the ati tool to get max mem speed, a little over 511mhz and logged the temps, the max temp was 75.5 deg c. My question is, is this too hot to be running this card? Also, I see cooling kits for these cards, but to be honest, I have yet to come across a game i couldnt play with everything set at max speed. What i really want to know is, where does the heat come from? I'm no electrical genius, I was just wondering what generates so much heat? If you were able to cool the GPU to keep it's temp say below 50deg c could you over clock it to say 750mhz?? Realistically, what is the absolute fastest you could clock this card, and for that matter the CPU(p 3.2ghz prescott), if you had somthinng like chilled watercooling.
  2. Urlyin

    Urlyin Senior Moderator

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    Look at this thread Helicfi .. It's the GPU and Memory generating the heat
  3. helicfi New Member

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    What are the "physics" involved?

    Im interested in how the heat is produced?? is it more electrons being pushed through a smaller hole?? is it friction? Im trying to understand the physics of why these gpu/cpu's increase in temerature. I understand the "gas law" of compression and expansion and was wondering if there was a similiar law for electricty?...Also, what hasn't somebody come up with a "chilled" water cooling system? Ive the the freon type cooling systems but was wondering if you could just "chill" the liquid that cools your compents with an a/c type compressor? I think the biggest problem there would be to insulate the water lines so that the cooing didnt produce condensation.

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