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RealTemp & Speedfan

Discussion in 'RealTemp' started by dnoiz, Nov 15, 2009.

  1. dnoiz New Member

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    Hello, currently I have both programs running and there is a difference of 10 degrees between both programs for each core of my Q6600? Any ideas why? How do I verify which program is correct? :)

    r.
     
  2. dnoiz New Member

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    Just tried another program : SIW http://www.gtopala.com/

    This program show same temps as RealTemp, so I guess Speedfan is wrong. Sorry for my post. Back to Speedfan forum now :).

    r.
     
  3. Weer New Member

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    Real temp is all I use. It's simple, quick to launch and shows all the relevant information including CPU and FSB frequency.
     
  4. burebista

    burebista

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    Take latest SpeedFan beta (4.40 beta 5) and you're set. It's about different TJMax value.
     
  5. Lazzer408

    Lazzer408

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    I quit using speedfan because it doesnt work on half my systems. Realtemp seems to work fine.
     
  6. dnoiz New Member

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    That is the version I'm using.
    Shows CPU (core) temps 10 degrees less then the other two softwares.

    Speedfan probably allows some config to fix this. But I prefer that it is correct out of the box.

    r.
     
  7. ehume

    ehume

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    I have noticed that Speedfan and Real Temp report different numbers. But then I noticed that on the description page, "Each core on these processors has a digital thermal sensor (DTS) that reports temperature data relative to TjMax which is the safe maximum operating core temperature for the CPU."

    I suspect that if we adjust our TjMax to what Intel wants, the numbers on SF and RT will more or less match - except that RT seems to change much more quickly than SF.

    I've set my TjMax temps to 85C and I am getting about the same numbers between the two.

    But is this correct? What is the Intel-approved TjMax for an i7 860?
     
  8. Lazzer408

    Lazzer408

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    Alot lower then some of us run them? :rockout:

    afaik tjmax is 99c on the 860.
     
  9. unclewebb

    unclewebb RealTemp Author

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    TJMax information is written into each core of each Core i7/i5 CPU. Most of the original Core i7-900 series were 100C and most of the newer ones are 99C but you need to read a register in the CPU to make sure you are using the correct TJMax for that CPU.

    RealTemp and Core Temp are able to correctly read that information while other software does not.

    http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/3/3/1794507/RealTempBeta.zip

    Intel started doing this over a year ago and the register software needs to read has been well documented since then. Maybe someone needs to send the programmer of SpeedFan a link to Volume 3B of the Intel documentation and point him to Appendix B the Nehalem section.

    http://www.intel.com/Assets/PDF/manual/253669.pdf

    [​IMG]

    Bits [23:16] is where TJMax is hiding in these new CPUs.
     
  10. ehume

    ehume

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    Thank you very much.

    The key missing information is that Intel has that bit on the chip, and that RealTemp reads it.

    It would be nice if RealTemp indicated what the chip says its TjMax is, so that even if we change it, we know what Intel says it should be.

    I reset the Settings window to Default with the Set TjMax button active. Does the default reflect the info on my chip, or the standard setting?

    Thanks
     
  11. unclewebb

    unclewebb RealTemp Author

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    The Default button in RealTemp should use the Default value that's written into the chip. What does your CPU show?

    Here's another tool I wrote that allows you to read this register yourself so you can be 100% sure.

    http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/3/3/1794507/MSR.zip

    Intel likes to write hexadecimal numbers with an H or h at the end. Most people precede them with 0x. For my MSR tool you enter 1A2 in the MSR Number box or 0x1A2 and then click on the Read MSR button after that so it can read this data from your CPU. Within this number you will likely see the numbers 63 or 64. 63 in hexadecimal translates to 99 and 64 hex is 100 decimal. If it's not easy to see these numbers then post a screen shot of the MSR tool and I'll underline them for you but it should be easy to see. There's not much other information hiding in this register so those two digits usually stick out.
     
  12. a_ump

    a_ump

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    unclewebb is the man..... or woman :p, love realtemp!!!!
     
  13. ehume

    ehume

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    It's just beautiful. All of the TjMax's are 99C.

    I copied your instruction to a textfile I keep in the unzipped folder.

    What a wonderful tool this is. Thank you.
     
  14. unclewebb

    unclewebb RealTemp Author

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    You can learn a lot about the inner workings of your CPU with Volume 3B of the Intel documentation that I posted earlier combined with the ability to Read MSR so you can read the contents of any register you're interested in. Use some restraint when clicking on the Write MSR button. It's not usually a good idea to randomly write data into your CPU. Worst case you might crash your computer but after you restart all will be back to normal. I haven't actually done that yet but I'm sure it's a possibility if you put your mind to it. :)
     
  15. Nikolayevich2010 New Member

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