1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

Replacing PSU fan

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Dent1, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. Dent1

    Joined:
    May 18, 2010
    Messages:
    3,125 (2.01/day)
    Thanks Received:
    899
    I have been using a 460W CoolerMaster power supply unit for the last year or so, it holds up just fine, its rated as "silent" and it almost is when idle. However upon launching intensive applications the PSU's fan gets really loud to the point where its obviously louder than my 3x120MM 19 dB fans in the case and my video card's fan. I run cool and quite which helps a lot but the noise is really starting to disturb me.

    I know that unscrewing a PSU can be dangerous as the PSU can store electricity in the capacitors. But presuming that I cake precautions and drain the PSU overnight and use thick gloves when handling it would it be safe to replace the fan presuming the PSU can tolerate a 3pin or 4pin fan without any soldering.

    PS. I am not too concerned about the warranty and I do not feel like buying another PSU as I've only had this one for such a short time.
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2010
  2. AthlonX2

    AthlonX2 HyperVtXâ„¢

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    Messages:
    7,141 (2.47/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,643
    sure can make sure you solder the new wires to the connector inside the psu and use heatshrink the cover the splice
  3. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    21,519 (7.04/day)
    Thanks Received:
    6,043
    Openeing the PSU will void the warranty, just so you know;)

    As far as replacing the fan, sure and it isnt all that tough to do. Plan ahead though, some PSU fans are wired to the PCB and dont use a clip. So have the solder and iron ready just in case. If it does have a clip, they arent usually the same as what is on a stock fan (3-pin) so again, you may need to splice things together to make it work.
    Dent1 says thanks.
  4. Kenshai

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Messages:
    1,646 (0.70/day)
    Thanks Received:
    218
    Location:
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Every power supply I've messed with the fan has been soldered in. So you'd have to solder the new fan in. Honestly I'd just get a different power supply.
    Dent1 says thanks.
  5. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    13,881 (5.04/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,615
    Location:
    Cheeseland (Wisconsin, USA)
    Every power supply I've worked on has had the fan soldered, no plug-in connector (as Kenshai stated).

    I just cut the wires and splice the new fan in place, wrap with some electrical tape and close it back up. I've never had a problem.
  6. Dent1

    Joined:
    May 18, 2010
    Messages:
    3,125 (2.01/day)
    Thanks Received:
    899
    I was planning on just opening up the PSU, if it requires a solder I will not go through with it. The fan I want to use (120mm Akasa) has a 3 pin connection so my PSU will need to support it before I go ahead as I am not comfortable soldering stuff.
  7. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    13,881 (5.04/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,615
    Location:
    Cheeseland (Wisconsin, USA)
    It's really pretty easy and you do not have to solder anything if you do not want to do that.

    Side Note : If you electrocute yourself can I have your 4850?
    FreedomEclipse says thanks.
  8. Meow9000 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2009
    Messages:
    283 (0.15/day)
    Thanks Received:
    80
    Location:
    Wales, Uk
    Done this with one of mine and does not require any or minimal tools.

    1. unscrew the fan and cut the fan wire as close to the fan casing as you can

    2. Braid the wire so its expose for about 1/2 and inch

    3. Do the same with the replacement fan deciding how long you want the wire

    4. Connect both the wires and make sure you tie/twirl/round them together good (solder can be uses)

    5. Get some decent electrical tape and make sure its tight around the seal and nothing is exposed

    Your then good to go, but again only do this if you have no fear of electrics and you trust yourself. While it is safe its not really the most professional way.
    Dent1 and Arrakis+9 say thanks.
  9. Arrakis+9

    Arrakis+9

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    1,465 (0.57/day)
    Thanks Received:
    508
    thats the way i usually do it when i run across a power supply with a busted fan
  10. de.das.dude

    de.das.dude Pro Indian Modder

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,561 (4.94/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,967
    Ya that ^ is correct but i thing soldering the wires will be a good idea. though not necessary as the wires wont be moving around. but if there are sparks, it can be deadly.
    Dent1 says thanks.
  11. Arrakis+9

    Arrakis+9

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    1,465 (0.57/day)
    Thanks Received:
    508
    thats what the electrical tape is for ;)
  12. de.das.dude

    de.das.dude Pro Indian Modder

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,561 (4.94/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,967
    liquid ET is better, i have this grudge against normal tapes because they never seem to work for me. LOL
    Arrakis+9 says thanks.
  13. pr0n Inspector

    pr0n Inspector

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2008
    Messages:
    1,332 (0.64/day)
    Thanks Received:
    164
    You need to know the fan voltage at idle. some PSU fan controllers have really low (TX750 starts at 4V for example) idle voltage, many fans simply won't start when the PSU is turned on.
  14. MohawkAngel

    MohawkAngel New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,864 (0.91/day)
    Thanks Received:
    122
    CoolerMaster eXtreme 500w here changed the fan. 2 pins plugged in and not soldered. Some fans have the red and black wire reversed so if its not the same side then youll have to cut it and solder it the correct side or even twist wires only and put electrical tape...i never solder almost when it's wires even for my car repairs cause a good twist is as much solid as soldered and more flexible.
    For the electricl shock unplug the AC plug from psu, remove all wires plugged to components and motherboard and insert a metal clip from the green wire to a black wire on the 24 pins plug. It remove the current from condensers.

    For the wires if you need to splice them for the joint oyu must crush the wires to be flat at the end and put them inside each others like two hands crossing fingers...and then twist it. Thats simple. Like that instead of having only 2 big wires making the contact you haver plenty of smaller ones crossing each others .

    Believe me it's rock solid enough for a SUV doing rough terrain with load of vibration so enough for a psu fan.
  15. Bassman_soundking

    Bassman_soundking New Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Messages:
    265 (0.17/day)
    Thanks Received:
    9
    Location:
    Sacramento CA
    This is the way I do non-soldered connections, and I do car audio for a living with no problems yet. Make sure you use quality elec tape or use heat-shrink. Good luck!!
  16. de.das.dude

    de.das.dude Pro Indian Modder

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,561 (4.94/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,967
    Also what you could do is find the output cable +12V of the PSU, you can back track the drive power cable to find this. then make an incision and put the fan +ve wire in there. you can find and join the ground of the fan the same way.
  17. MohawkAngel

    MohawkAngel New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,864 (0.91/day)
    Thanks Received:
    122
    You could but anyway cooler master have removable pins in this serie ;)
  18. brandonwh64

    brandonwh64 Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Messages:
    18,529 (10.23/day)
    Thanks Received:
    6,042
    Location:
    Chatsworth, GA
    my Ultra LSP 650W PSUs 135mm fan died due to MASSIVE amounts of sand in it. So i took it apart to find that the connector wassnt a 3 or 4 pin one like you would find on a motherboard. It was a 2 pin like on a older video card fan so i took the old fan and cut the wires off, then since they dont make replacement 135mm fans, i ordered a blue LED 140MM fan with a chrome grill and soldered the old fans wires to the new fan and drilled out the 135mm fan holes to make it fit. never the less it ran good but due to my mistake to not secure the wires, one of them fell into the fan blades and it ran for about 3 months locked up til i realized it. Now i have changed it out with a 60CFM cooler master fan and did better cable management and it works like a charm and keeps the PSU real cool.
    Crunching for Team TPU

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page