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Sapphire Radeon X1950PRO (AGP) + Zalman VF1000 problem

Discussion in 'Graphics Cards' started by Matt1926, Dec 6, 2007.

  1. Matt1926 New Member

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    I recently purchased a Zalman VF1000 cooler for my Sapphire X1950 pro and I have to say, it works like a dream, the GPU core has gone from 60 degrees at idle (with stock cooler) to 40 at idle. The problem however is with the blue ramsinks that come with the cooler, I have applied them exactly how it said in the manual, taking extra care to ensure they are applied securly and covering the VRAM nicely, however, the temperature of the VRAM has gone from averaging 40 degrees (stock cooler) to 80 degrees at idle, while playing Call of Duty 4 yesterday I minimized the game to find that the VRAM was 124 degrees!

    I dont have a very good PSU (only 250W its the stock one that came with my PC 4 years ago) and I am getting a new one ASAP. Surely that can't effect the heat of the VRAM particularly as it is essentially only cooled by the blue ramsinks.

    Anybody have any suggestions or ideas why the temperature has gone up so high?

    If you need anymore info just tell me and I'll post it up. I'm quite new to all this stuff but I'm eager to learn.
  2. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    Depending on the facory cooler , the ram may have been cooled by it. My honest guess is that the fan wont get air all the way to the ramsinks. Is there a fan controller in line to the cooler or is it plugged directly into a mobo header?

    Judging by the temp increase I would assume also that your case cooling isnt up to par either. (at least not to par with a VF1000)

    Also please fill out your system specs in the userCP tab at the top, when done with that make sure to check the box that says show others. THX
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  3. Matt1926 New Member

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    Ok, I'm filling in the specs right now, I'll put in all the data I can (using my limited knowledge of PC's)

    There is a fan controller for the VF1000 but it has to also plug into the mobo, which gives me another problem because there are only 2 of these sockets,I'm currently using one for the CPU fan and one for the VF1000, meaning I have no exhaust fan on the back of my PC. I've left the side off as that seems to be keeping it cooler than it was when I put the side back onto the case.
  4. Matt1926 New Member

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    Sorry for the double post, but just an update. I downloaded speed fan and upped the fan speed of the VF-1000 to 100% (it was previously at 54%!), thats given me some good results, the VRAM is still quite hot but has gone down to 60 degrees at idle, which isn't too bad, still looking for any ideas on how to get it even lower though. I should be getting a new PSU pretty soon, and I am planning on getting a nice new case to get some nice cool air flowing through. Just got to wait until I get paid I guess...
  5. Kursah

    Kursah

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    I know that the VRM on some x1950pro's can get very hot, it's the voltage regulation for the card and can create severe instability if overheated. On a properly cooled setup they can still reach approx 120C.

    The VRM's will be located on the end of the card with the power plug on the face side (memory/gpu side). Depending on the version of x1950pro you have, you may not have VRM, but to me that's what it sounds like. Because to my knowlege there is no temp measurement for VRAM on that card, but there is a VRM temp measurement.

    If you want to learn more about VRM, go here:

    http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?t=23146

    That might help you with this issue. If your temps are in fact of the memory, how are you measuring them?
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  6. Matt1926 New Member

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    ATI tool just tells me that the Graphics Card temp is 35 and Catalyst is telling me 34. I am also using Everest to measure the temps in more detail, and it is telling me:
    Temperature: GPU VRM 62
    Temperature: GPU Ambient 33

    Oh, and as it says in the title its the Sapphire X1950 Pro I am using.
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2007
  7. MadCow New Member

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    62 for the VRM is pretty high. But thats VRM not VRAM. The VRM is the voltage controller, and it will get hot. There is no thermal diode for the VRAM. Did you put a heatsink on it? Because if you didn't you better hope to god that it doesn't blow up. Stick a ramsink or two on it and you'll be fine.
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  8. Matt1926 New Member

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    The all the VRAM chips have the Zalman Ramsinks on. After reading that other thread and your post (MadCow) it turns out that I need to stick a heatsink on the voltage controller, I should be able to go and get some this Sunday, will a small Zalman one do for it? Or should I get a different type?
  9. jtleon New Member

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    Not Unusual - Blue sinks have poor conductivity adhesive

    Zalman uses that yellow-white (cream) colored PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive), which is basically a standard PSA (usually clear or slightly tinted yellow) mixed with a silicone based compound - just like (but not identical to) silicone heatsink grease.

    You probably notice that the thickness of the grease is much thicker than a thin film. You can reduce that thickness by heating the blue sinks up with a hair dryer and pressing down on them (wear a leather glove or you'll be burned). Twist back and forth as you press to flow out as much of the creamy goop as possible. Keep doing this until you see no more goop flow out between the chip and the blue sink.

    This step should greatly reduce your VRAM temps, but they may still be more than the "no-sink" temperatures. The best solution is to peal off the creamy goop and use Arctic Silver Adhesive instead - for a permanent high thermal conductivity joint!

    Those small blue sinks are really just eye-candy - not much more anyway.:roll:

    Regards,
    jtleon

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