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Silver conductant vdroop fix.....

Discussion in 'Motherboards & Memory' started by farlex85, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    My ds3-r has some vdroop issues I'd like to fix. I'm not touching a soldering iron, and from what I've found there isn't a good working pencil mod for it. I did find this though, which the person says can be done w/ silver conductor. So my question is where can I get this, and how destructive is this if I mess up, and how reversible is it? Never heard anything about the silver fix. Thanks.
  2. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    Its a good idea to use if using as a full bridge, as in your link. Not to be a replacement for pencil mods tho!

    As for reversal, maybe lightly scratching , or a solvent of some sort that wont hurt the motherboard. Also IMO if you are really already worried about removal, you shouldn't attempt it anyways!
  3. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    Yeah I guess maybe I shouldn't do it. I haven't attempted hard mods of any kind before, but this vdroop is bothering and seemed easy enough. What do you mean by full bridge? From what I could tell this would just involve placing some of the conductor between those two pins, just enough to connect them. Is this correct or no?
  4. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    yes it is making a bridge between the two points with the silver paint. In a pencil mod you are lowering the resistance, not making it zero resistance as in your mod!
    farlex85 says thanks.
  5. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    Ah ok, and that's another thing, this shouldn't be attempted w/o a multi-meter correct? And where could I buy this silver stuff?
  6. tkpenalty New Member

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    Wait.... DS3R has the 6 Phases right? There shouldnt be that much of a vdroop issue o_O

    That theoretically could work, though I think it would put more stress on the voltage filtering components that come after the voltage reg/clockgen. Then again i doubt ONE resistor removed from the circuit could really do anything.

    The vdroop is mainly because of the inefficiency of the filtering components.
    farlex85 says thanks.
  7. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    well the mod you are trying , there is no need for a DMM. You arent looking for resistance of any value other than 0.00V with the conductive ink.

    You are thinking of a pencil mod, where you takes voltages and lower them. In that instance the Ohms or resistance is measured.

    If you put that silver paint on a piece of paper and let it dry I bet there is no resistance there either!

    Can be found at my local radioshack!
    farlex85 says thanks.
  8. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    Yeah it has 6 phases, but I get some vdroop problems still. I get a .03 minimum vdroop at all times, sometimes it ventures to as great as .1v:eek:, usually somewhere around .05. It's not too bothersome till I start venturing over 3.6ghz, where it starts to compromise my stability. This mod above only had one person verify it, but they said it removed it completely, so I thought it was worth a shot, although only if reversible.
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2008

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