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SilverStone Intros Internal Enclosure to Ease HDD Hot-Swapping

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    SilverStone announced FP57, a product that will come handy for those in need of hot-swapping hard drives. The FP57 is an internal hard drive enclosure that occupies a 5.25" drive bay, and allows hot-swapping of a 3.5" SATA hard drive. Pulling out a hard drive is as easy as retracting the slider to open the lid. Inside, the FP57 has a completely tool-free mechanism to plug the hard drive into the SATA power/data receptacle. A number of these enclosures can be stacked, limited only by the number of 5.25" bays and SATA ports you have. Once stacked a fan can be attached to the rear of the stack, to ventilate it. Slated for release on the 16th of this month, the SilverStone FP57 will be priced at €19.

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    Source: TechConnect Magazine
     
  2. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    Interesting design but didn't Antec do something just like this, and if I recall correctly cheaper also?
     
  3. Widjaja

    Widjaja

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    Just looks like a typical internal HHD enclosure.
    Seems you don't have to screw the HDD in to a rack.

    Antec have an internal cocking bay for 3.5" drive which this basically is.
    The iCute iTwin is even better since it can use 2.5" and 3.5" drives.
     
  4. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    These types of enclosures have been around for ages. I remember eying things like this up in the 90's (and possibly earlier, but I just don't remember anymore. Getting old sucks). This is not a new concept at all.
     

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