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Skydiver aims to break sound barrier in free fall

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Sasqui, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Crazy.

    http://news.yahoo.com/skydiver-aims-break-sound-barrier-free-fall-184340527.html

    [​IMG]

    http://www.wired.com/playbook/2012/03/red-bull-stratos/felix-baumgartner-red-bull-stratos-jump-01/

     
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  2. m1dg3t

    m1dg3t

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    It's Ok! RedBull; GIVES YOU WINGS! :D
     
  3. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    LOL. I should have titled the post "F-in nuts!"
     
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  4. m1dg3t

    m1dg3t

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    I dunno, I think this is awesome! The only good thing I can say about RedBull is they push the extreme sports envelope! :rockout: :rockout:
     
  5. Inceptor

    Inceptor

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    As long as he keeps himself aerodynamically stable, no problems.
    He's already successfully done a jump from 96 000 feet (18mi/30km).
    He'll accelerate, go supersonic, then the atmosphere will slow him down to terminal velocity.
    I wish him luck, it'll be interesting to watch.

    Now, what would be more interesting is a jump from low earth orbit, 60mi/100km.
    Anyone that goes that high gets Astronaut wings. That would be very cool.
     
  6. entropy13

    entropy13

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    Skydiver eyes record-breaking jump over NM

    ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) — Skydiver Felix Baumgartner's attempt at the highest, fastest free fall in history Tuesday is more than just a stunt.

    His planned 23-mile dive from the stratosphere should provide scientists with valuable information for next-generation spacesuits and techniques that could help astronauts survive accidents.

    Jumping from more than three times the height of the average cruising altitude for jetliners, Baumgartner hopes to become the first person to break the sound barrier outside of an airplane. His team has calculated that to be 690 mph based on the altitude of his dive.

    His medical director Dr. Jonathan Clark, a NASA space shuttle crew surgeon who lost his wife, Laurel Clark, in the 2003 Columbia accident, says no one knows what happens to a body when it breaks the sound barrier.

    "That is really the scientific essence of this mission," said Clark, who is dedicated to improving astronauts' chances of survival in a high-altitude disaster.

    Clark told reporters Monday he expects Baumgartner's pressurized spacesuit to protect him. If all goes well and he survives the death-defying jump, NASA could certify a new generation of spacesuits for protecting astronauts, and provide an escape option, from spacecraft at 120,000 feet.

    Currently, spacesuits are certified to protect astronauts to 100,000 feet, the level reached by Joe Kittinger in 1960 when he set the current free-fall record by jumping from an open gondola 19.5 miles high. Kittinger's speed of 614 mph was just shy of breaking the sound barrier at that altitude.

    But whether Baumgartner, a 43-year-old Austrian military parachutist and extreme athlete, can attempt the jump depends on New Mexico's often unpredictable weather.

    Winds from a cold front already delayed the jump by a day. Even the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, 200 miles to the north, was forced to delay by a day its mass ascension of more than 500 balloons over the weekend. Baumgartner's jump can only be made if winds on the ground are less than 2 mph.

    Midday Monday, the team remained optimistic for liftoff. The best window for the week was Tuesday and Wednesday, before another front is expected to move in.

    Baumgartner is to be lifted into the stratosphere beginning around 7 a.m. MDT by a helium balloon that will stretch 55 stories high. Once he reaches his target altitude, he will open the hatch of his capsule and make a gentle, bunny-style hop.

    Any contact with the capsule on his exit could tear the pressurized suit. A rip could expose him to a lack of oxygen and temperatures as low as minus 70 degrees. It could cause potentially lethal bubbles to form in his bodily fluids, a condition known as "boiling blood."

    There are also risks he could spin out of control, causing other risky problems.

    Despite the horrifying hazards of the dive, he and his team of experts say they have confidence in their built-in solutions and have a plan for almost every contingency. The spacesuit and capsule were tested in two early skydiving practice runs, one from 15 miles up in March and 18 miles in July.


    Full article here.
     
  7. eidairaman1

    eidairaman1

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    he needs to atleast reach and break 768 Miles per hour to bust the sound barrier. now with the size of him and the space suit the sonic boom will be small, compared to that of a Fighter.
     
  8. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    isn't the speed of sound relative to the air pressure?

    so will he actually go supersonic in the medium that surrounds him at that time?
     
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  9. AlienIsGOD

    AlienIsGOD

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    I hope it happens today, i am really looking forward to seeing the jump.
     
    Crunching for Team TPU
  10. KieX

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    I'm really looking forward to this. We already have planned tourist space-rides.. perhaps in the future this will be what all the cool kids do for kicks.
     
  11. 3870x2

    3870x2

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    I thought that in his conditions it was 690 mph.

    EDIT: yep, 690.

    This is also how they recorded the sound-byte for Guiles special attack.
     
  12. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Speed of sound decreases as elevation increases and as pressure and temperature both drop.
     
  13. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    1/2 correct. Interesting to find that altitude and pressure have virtually no effect on the speed of sound, it's almost completely dependant on temperature, not pressure See this graph:

    [​IMG]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_sound
     
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  14. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Sasqui says thanks.
  15. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    I thought the same thing until I poked around! Somewhat counter-intuitive indeed.
     
  16. TheMailMan78

    TheMailMan78 Big Member

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    Weight and temperature of gas changes dramatically at his altitude when he jumps. Its not consistent at all. Also is he free falling (didn't read the original article) because if so what about terminal velocity? Once the density gets high enough there is no way he can break the sound barrier without propulsion.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2012
  17. EarthDog

    EarthDog

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    I wonder why there is a speed of sound at sea level and at altitude then....?

    As far as TV, he just needs to be aerodynamic. Obviously if he lays out like a typical skydiver the TV will come much sooner than if he is in an aerodynamic position.

    EDIT: Was this delayed for today?
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2012
  18. AphexDreamer

    AphexDreamer

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    Well there is generally warmer air at sea level than at higher altitudes.
     
  19. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Look at the red and blue lines in the chart I posted (hint: above).

    Red is temperature and blue is speed of sound.

    See a correlation?

    Green and Tan are pressure and density of the air, there is no correlation with speed of sound
     
  20. EarthDog

    EarthDog

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    I sure see a correlation below the 10... seems like it increases as the altitude lowers. Yes, temperatures are there, true, but you dont see the speed of sound at XXC vs -XXC, you just see altitude. not to mention, for all intents and purposes, we are talking where airplanes can fly, not 50 miles up.
     
  21. TheMailMan78

    TheMailMan78 Big Member

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    From your link....

    So as the density increases so does the speed of sound. I get what you saying but hes not jumping from the Thermospere. He jumping where there is air density. Just not much and the tempature is -70F there. Hes gonna hit 80F pretty damn quick. ALSO does he have any propulsion?
     
  22. slyfox2151

    slyfox2151

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  23. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    That's the reason.

    AFAIK, No.
     
  24. HossHuge

    HossHuge

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    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2013
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  25. AlienIsGOD

    AlienIsGOD

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    Launch is a go in 45 mins :D
     
    Crunching for Team TPU

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