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The official TPU IPv6 thread

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by qubit, Feb 18, 2011.

  1. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    IPv6 is coming very soon now, so post all your IPv6 news, talk, tips and problems here!

    EDIT: This site has definitive info on IPv6: www.ipv6.com The name isn't all that surprising, huh? ;)

    Here's another one: http://ipv6.net

    And finally, the Microsoft angle: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/network/bb530961

    Amazing what 10 seconds on google brings up. :D

    ANOTHER EDIT:

    I think the following info is so useful, that I lifted it from a later post I made and then deleted the post.

    [​IMG]

    Thinkbroadband has some useful info on IPv6. Here's the best bits:

    IPv6 test sites

    These are unreacheable on your standard IPv4 connection. An odd feeling, knowing they're there! If anyone can browse them let us know.

    http://ipv6.google.com/
    http://www.v6.facebook.com/
    http://www.thinkbroadband.com/
    http://ipv6-speedtest.net

    Does my ISP support IPv6?

    These British ISPs do at the moment (19FEB11). Note how the biggest one, BT, is absent:

    AAISP
    clara.net
    Entanet
    Exa Networks
    IDNet

    Get the rest of the Thinkbroadband goodies here.
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2011
  2. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    ipv6 has been here for ages, don't expect any changes soon that will affect you
  3. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    Actually yes of course, since 1995. I just meant with IPv4 addresses running out now, it's use is finally gonna start ramping up.

    My ISP is fully IPv6 capable and can give me an IPv6 address any time I want.

    I wonder if there are any standard consumer routers that support it yet?
  4. scooper22

    scooper22 New Member

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    IPv4 walks into a bar...

    An IPv4 address space walks into a bar: "A strong CIDR please. I'm exhausted."
    remixedcat, theJesus, Bo$$ and 2 others say thanks.
  5. scooper22

    scooper22 New Member

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    IPv6 walks into a bar...

    IPv6 walks into a bar, ordered something to drink, but nobody understood him.


    SCNR :)
    remixedcat says thanks.
  6. scooper22

    scooper22 New Member

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    Also,
    1. the IPv4 adresses have been registered, this does not mean all registered addresses are in use yet
    2. having run out of IPv4 does not mean IPv6 is coming, just that NAT is going to become more ofted used. Be prepared to shed extra $ for a unique IP

    Or look more CSI *facepalm*
    [​IMG]
    Perra says thanks.
  7. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    Great posts scooper, especially the first one. :)

    Perhaps we should call this the IPv6 joke thread! :laugh: :toast:
  8. m4gicfour

    m4gicfour

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    I can reach those sites, but it may not be my ISP.

    My router, Netgear WNR3500L
    supports IPv6 over IPv4 tunnel. Meaning the router's LAN address and any IPv6 capable computers attached to it get assigned an IPV6 addresss, and then the router auto-detects what the ISP supports and deals accordingly.

    My ISP, SaskTel, does not appear to support IPV6 on the client side, at least (the router can only get an IPv4 address from the ISP, and displays "connection type: 6to4 tunnel. Router's IPv6 address on WAN: Not Available.)

    I can deal with SaskTel's little quirks because they don't cap bandwidth. At all.

    I bought this router with the intention of flashing DD-WRT because it supports open-source firmwares out-of-the box and I was tired of the 2wire unit the ISP provided as a modem/router overheating and overloading but haven't gotten around to installing DDWRT since the router is working so well on stock. (they actually advertise the WNR3500L as being Open-source compatible. For anyone wanting to buy it, note: needs to be the WNR3500L. The WNR3500 is not, to my knowledge, meant to be used with third-party firmwares.)


    EDIT:
    ipv6-speedtest.net detects that I'm on IPv4, and tells me so. The other sites just connect like there was no difference.
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2011
  9. Aceman.au

    Aceman.au

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    Australia is on its last batch of 1Pv4 address I heard.

    IPv6 will bring something like 3 trillion more?
  10. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    not quite, australian ISP's simply bought out the last IPv4 batches there was available. so we got more leftover than you :p
  11. Aceman.au

    Aceman.au

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    Hey Im from Shepparton, Vic mate I got told this in a TAFE course
  12. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    ya know, i shoulda checked where you are.


    aus bought up the last IPv4 addresses available, way more than we actually need. just another step by telstra to make sure they dont have to do any real upgrades for a few more years.
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  13. Aceman.au

    Aceman.au

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    Telstra... What a bunch of idiots. Anything to save money.
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  14. Aceman.au

    Aceman.au

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    Hey my Win 7 says that Im IPv6 capable, is it my router or just my PC with the necessary software??
  15. Hayder_Master

    Hayder_Master

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    after discover the "NAT" IP v4 will hold longer than expect
  16. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    that just means your OS is. you need OS, LAN and WAN to be IPv6.

    (your PC, your router, your ISP)
  17. Aceman.au

    Aceman.au

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    Ah kk
  18. Black Panther

    Black Panther Senior Moderator™ Staff Member

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    How can I check whether my router is up to it?
    It seems to show nothing on the specs..
  19. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    then its probably not compatible.


    its not a huge deal really, dont forget about NAT and IP tunneling.

    say, google could have one IPv4 site as a tunnel for all its websites on IPv6 - yes, in the future that may well be slower than native IPv6 but you WONT lose connectivity to websites, just because you're on one side or another.
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  20. 95Viper

    95Viper

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    στο άλφα έως ωμέγα
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2011
    Jack Doph says thanks.
  21. Hybrid_theory

    Hybrid_theory New Member

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    I was at an IPv6 summit at a university which had several talks from different companies.

    One of the important things mentioned was to only use tunneling, NAT or Dual stack as a temporary solution. The idea is to get rid of NAT and have public IPv6 addresses for all your machines. Ill admit it sounds kinda scary to have my machine IP internet wide, but I suppose it still goes through your router/firewall.
  22. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    it takes us back to the modem days, where port forwards werent needed.


    i can see the advantages for businesses and whatnot, but i dont really want/need it for mysef. i'd likely stick with one IP and NAT (ISP's will probably charge per unique WAN IP anyway)
  23. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    I can't see that ever taking hold namely because of the costs to ISPs. Instead of issuing customers a single IP per modem/gateway, they would have to issue one per device. It's pretty obvious how that can be used to screw customers.

    Not to mention, wireless. I doubt NAT is going anywhere simply because no one wants to give ISPs anymore power than they already have.


    Very, very few ISPs in North America are IPv6 anyway.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  24. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i think part of it might be related to 3G (and whatever comes after it) devices - being behind NAT can screw them over for various applications such as VOIP, so unique IP's makes sense there.


    the way i see it however, the more devices move over to IPV6, the more v4 IP's open up for legacy devices anyway. the transition will be slow.
  25. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Yeah, cellphones, smartphones, etc. are going to keep their own IP address because, think about it, they essentially are Internet gateways. I'm talking businesses and homes where there are multiple stationary computers. Although I could see laptops getting their own IP address with an ISP if wireless WANs improve to a point where there's no need to log into a WLAN.


    The infrastructure has to be updated before devices can. For example, TV stations had to be broadcasting in digital before it made sense for consumers to buy digital televisions. Likewise, it doesn't make sense to buy IPv6 devices when most routers nor ISPs support it. Someone, somewhere with a lot of influence is going to have to make the push. So far, it hasn't happened.
    Crunching for Team TPU

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