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The Structure of and IP Address / 32 bit address

Discussion in 'Programming & Webmastering' started by DreamSeller, Jul 10, 2009.

  1. DreamSeller Guest

    Learnt this at my todays IT courses and i thought it would be great to share with you guys :toast:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    That's just binary -> decimal conversion. It's the packet structure that is interesting. :laugh:
     
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  3. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

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    Next he's gonna learn to calculate netmasks :)
     
  4. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    What? 1=1? WHY WAS I NOT INFORMED OF THIS
     
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  5. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i learned all that stuff and then forgot it... the theory was 100% useless when setting up networks, in practical use.
     
  6. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Yup, just remember 192.168.0.1 or whatever. It isn't hard to convert that to hex:
    C0A80001

    Or binary:
    11000000101010000000000000000001
     
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  7. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    What is 192.168.0.1 used for?
     
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  8. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    usually a router/DHCP server ;)
     
  9. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Yup, that's the default router IP for D-Link routers.

    The following are reserved for intranet use:
    10.#.#.#
    172.16.#.#
    192.168.#.#

    172.0.0.1 is reserved for loopback (aka localhost).
     
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  10. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

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    And many other brands. Most routers have either 192.168.x.1, 192.168.x.100 or 192.168.x.254. Something in the 10.x.x.x is more rare, never seen the 172.16.x.x range used as default setting, not sure why.
     
  11. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    the 10.0.0.x range is very common here in australia, Telstra modems and routers all use it. (usually on really shit hardware too)
     
  12. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    I've had only 2 routers and they were both 192.168.1.1

    While we're talking about networking... what happens if you want more than 155 computers on a network (slots 192.168.x.100 - 192.168.x.255 are used up)
     
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  13. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    you get 255, minus the router.

    If you want more, you need to segregate into class C subnets, 192.168.0.1 for 254 users, 192.168.1.1 for the others. Set the subnet mask to 255.255.0.0 and communication will be possible between them, they merely need the gateway IP address set to the router and everything will be well.

    where did starting at 100 come from? it starts at 1
     
  14. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    192.168.#.# is definitely the most common. A Netgear I worked with for some reason thought 192.168.#.# was in use so it fell back to 10.#.#.# (99% sure it was faulty though). I, too, have never seen 172.16.#.# but, it is reserved for intranet use by IANA.

    Apparently, 192.168.#.# has 65k addresses, 172.16.#.# has a 1,000k addresses, and 10.#.#.# has 16,000k addresses. I assume that, if 192.168.#.# isn't enough (consumer-class), they go straight to 10.#.#.# (enterprise-class) skipping the 172.16.#.# range.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2009
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  15. DreamSeller Guest

    very very true
    im so noob at this fckn theory i wish we had the test in practice form :(
     
  16. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    D-Link...
    Device = 192.168.0.1
    DHCP = 192.168.0.100-192.168.0.199

    Netopia (aka Motorola)...
    Device = 192.168.1.254
    DHCP = don't use it :laugh:

    But yeah, the router is almost always at 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1
     
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  17. AltecV1

    AltecV1 New Member

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    wow that is complicated:p
     

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