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The TPU Darkroom - Digital SLR and Photography Club

Discussion in 'techPowerUp! Club Forum' started by DanishDevil, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    If there's one thing I can really take away from taking a digital photography class, it's that in order to take really great consistent pictures, you need a decent tripod.
  2. ste2425

    ste2425

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    ive been meaning to get one just havent had the spare cash other things like the car, pc hardware rent food has taken priority
  3. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    Totally understand that man. I want another SLR for myself, but there's just no money for it.

    Meanwhile, all I've got is my HTC Incredible (8MP camera, but it honestly sucks) and I can borrow my girl's D60 whenever.
  4. burtram

    burtram

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    Took this one today while on the way back home from a day of shooting (guns mostly, along with a few photos)

    [​IMG]

    Came out well i think, considering i did not use any form of tripod/monopod. :toast:
  5. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    Not too shabby! Where is that?
  6. burtram

    burtram

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    Los Padres National Park
  7. King Wookie

    King Wookie New Member

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    A tripod is a really good investment, but honestly, any solid secure surface can help. Even holding your camera against something like a tree trunk will help. I have taken longer exposures just resting the camera on a fence post. A small bean bag on you car's window sill will work.

    Also, if you can, go for a faster shutter speed. But in low light it is a problem.

    As for the high ISO artifacts, does your camera have a long exposure NR setting? It can help a bit.
  8. ste2425

    ste2425

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    carn't believe i never thought to rest it on something :p

    as for the camera it has no exposure setting, unless they have given it a different name, the settings i can manually change are:
    White balance
    ISO value
    Metering
    focus area
    Real Time AF
    Flash Of-set

    theres also a value at the bottom of the screen when viewing a shot before taking it i can change i think it alters the focus and light sensitivity so that mights be the exposure thing.
    it reads like this:
    F2.8 1/160. I can change both values.
    Would any of them be what you was talking about?
  9. King Wookie

    King Wookie New Member

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    The 1st one that says F is your aperture. It controls how much light the lens lets in. And the bigger the aperture, the more "blurred" things in front or behind what you focussed on become. Wierdly the bigger the aperture, the smaller the number. So F2.6 is a bigger aperture than F11.

    The second number is your shutter speed in seconds. The faster the shutter, the less light it lets in. But at slower shutter speeds you start to get camera shake, where things look blurry because of the camera moving while the shutter is open. Basically the longer your lens, the faster the shutter speed needs to be to stop blurring. Or use a tripod.

    So to answer your question, using a slower shutter speed will let more light in, which means you can use a lower ISO and get less noise. But you need some way of making your camera not move to do that.

    Hope that helps.

    EDIT: Some further reading: http://photo.net/learn/making-photographs/exposure
    Ahhzz and ste2425 say thanks.
  10. ste2425

    ste2425

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    :toast: thats helps a whole lot man thanks for that
  11. Black Panther

    Black Panther Senior Moderatorâ„¢ Staff Member

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    My favorite photo so far with the Olympus E330.
    A bit weird is the rainbow effect in the sky. Perhaps it's because there was the sun - is that normal?

    [​IMG]

    On the other hand this photo taken a couple of seconds later from another angle appears quite fine, no rainbows and stuff:

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  12. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    Can't get away from my girlfriend's balcony:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Edit: Gorillarape.com?
  13. ste2425

    ste2425

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  14. Black Panther

    Black Panther Senior Moderatorâ„¢ Staff Member

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    Lol that url does sound pretty crazy, but there's nothing crazy at all:) It allows smooth upload for image files up to 4MB in size.

    Let's say it just means 'gorilla - r - ape' after all gorillas are apes aren't they? ;)
  15. aCid888*

    aCid888* New Member

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    [​IMG]

    Om NomNomNomNoMNOM Chickenz
  16. mjkmike

    mjkmike

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    @ Black Panthe


    This ape does'nt whan't anything to do with the gorillias
    Crunching for Team TPU
  17. mjkmike

    mjkmike

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    Dam I need to move back to Vancover so I have something to share.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  18. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    Damn you aCid for making me hungry.
  19. BazookaJoe

    BazookaJoe

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    Me again, here are a few random plants shots with my SX20IS, still trying to fine tune some skillz :

    Playing with very bright backgrounds : Mainly attempting to keep foreground detail without washing out the background entirely.
    [​IMG]

    These just looked pretty.
    [​IMG]

    Some more macro action - this little plant is TINY - the little spikes are about 1/4 as thick as a hair.
    [​IMG]
    Crunching for Team TPU
  20. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

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    I believe the rainbow stuff is called lens flare, it happens whenever you have a particularly bright light source somewhere in the picture. Try taking a photograph of a streetlamp( or some concentrated light source) and see whether it has the same effect or not (the rainbow colour might be different though).
    Black Panther says thanks.
  21. BazookaJoe

    BazookaJoe

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    Yeah, this is quite normal with larger lenses, especially when there is a bright light source to an angle of the lens - the light travels across the lens instead of "into" it, and refracts around in the lens causing the light spectrum to spread as it enters the glass (different color frequencies travel at different speed sand hence a variable divergence as it crosses path with the lens) causing the rainbow.

    They have these Doohickeys to help protect against that - as often seen on telescopic lenses as they usually have a large main lens at the end, that is very prone to catching light.

    See pics for a rough illustration of how the camera flash taking the photo is caught by the lens without the .. blocker .. diffuser .. whatever you call that thing on the end...

    [​IMG]
    Black Panther says thanks.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  22. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

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    Lens hood if you are interested in its proper name, I think that version is called the petal lens hood.
    Black Panther says thanks.
  23. HammerON

    HammerON The Watchful Moderator Staff Member

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    Taken back in 2005 at the family hunting lodge:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Crunching for Team TPU
  24. ste2425

    ste2425

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  25. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    That's a hell of a place.

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