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Thecus Unveils N7700PRO, World’s First 10 GbE SMB NAS

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Thecus Technology is always pushing the boundaries of what NAS devices are capable of. Today, Thecus is proud to introduce the N7700PRO, the follow up to the award winning N7700. While the original N7700 made its mark by being the world’s first seven-bay NAS device, the N7700PRO raises the stakes with breathtaking performance, unmatched reliability, and maximum flexibility.

    With the N7700PRO, blistering performance is the name of the game. At its core is an Intel Core 2 Duo CPU and a whopping 4GB of high-speed DDR2 800 memory, making it the most powerful NAS unit available. In fact, with its PCI-e slot, the N7700PRO can reach data transfer speeds of over 300 MB/s by adding a PCI Express 10 Gbps Ethernet adapter. All of this raw power easily manipulates large amounts of data – perfect for the N7700PRO’s seven 3.5” SATA drive bays that can accommodate up to 14TB of storage. Need even more storage at your disposal? With its stackable feature, you can connect up to five N7700PROs together and easily manage them all via a master unit. The N7700PRO is even compatible with iSCSI initiators and supports iSCSI thin provisioning for added performance and flexibility.

    [​IMG]

    The raw speed is only part of the story. The N7700PRO is an ideal place to safely secure your data. Multiple RAID modes including RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, and JBOD allow you to choose the ideal level of data redundancy to suit your needs. Online RAID expansion and migration are there as well for added convenience. For ultimate reliability, the N7700PRO also comes with a unique Dual DOM design, which features a secondary DOM that automatically reprograms the primary DOM should a failure occur. To ensure compatibility with as many networks as possible, the N7700PRO supports multiple file systems (Ext3, XFS and ZFS) and multiple operating systems (Windows, Mac, and Linux). With the popularity of VMware, virtualization technology is now widely used in the IT world. Thecus is now the member of Technology Alliance Partner (TAP), and N7700PRO is undergoing full VMware certification.

    “Powered by Intel Core 2 Duo technology, the N7700PRO is one of the most powerful NAS devices in our arsenal,” said Florence Shih, Thecus Technology General Manager. “We are thrilled to bring the N7700PRO to users worldwide, and invite hardware enthusiasts and enterprise users everywhere to experience just what is possible with Thecus engineering.”
     
  2. Breathless New Member

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    Quite the monster. Now if only it is affordable.....
     
  3. toyo New Member

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    So a C2D+4GB RAM is "enough" to control a nas. Can someone that really has access to some powerful NAS at home or work just give us a shout, how much of this is overkill? What CPU+RAM system would be enough to drive this monster without hiccups and leave a 15% or so overhead when it is fully tortured?
     
  4. Jizzler

    Jizzler

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    There are far too many variables to give a simple answer.

    And besides, when looking at a device like this, it's usually not about the "overkill" factor, but if it provides an acceptable level of performance or not.

    Ex: Backup for my servers. I don't need a lot of performance here as long as I can get "x" GB or TB to it in a reasonable amount of time. Especially as we're not a company that runs 24/7.

    But lets say I wanted to expand storage available to my servers, as they'll be running an application that needs access to a large amount of data. Then I'm going to be more concerned with IOPS, both with healthly and degraded arrays, rebuild performance, online capacity expansion, etc.
     
  5. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    overkill for modern purposes, yes.

    but if this thing was filled with SSD drives and actually output in the 10Gb range (1,250MB/s - 1.25GB/s) then i can imagine that level of power being needed.
     
  6. PP Mguire

    PP Mguire New Member

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    Not unless the drives are all being simultaneously accessed at the same time or something like that. Its like why have a OC12 connection if nobody will use all the bandwidth? Well host a very popular torrent rig and you might need something like this and that connection speed.

    For normal smoes like us, overkill in simple.
     
  7. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    RAID 5?

    faaaaaaar beyond what any TPU'er needs. this is purely enterprise class - but its one of the first practical applications of 10Gbe that i've seen.
     
  8. PP Mguire

    PP Mguire New Member

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    Up until the other day i didnt know 10gb existed :eek:

    I meant by mass multiple machines from around the world. Like i said, mini torrent server or something like that. Mass file server.
     
    Mussels says thanks.
  9. Jizzler

    Jizzler

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    Perhaps, but this average smoe at an SMB doesn't like to wait :D

    [​IMG]

    WD RE3 x 8, Adaptec 5805, and a mere 4Gbps from the quad port Intel Pro NIC.

    C2D with 4GB? Try Xeon E5520 with 12GB ;)
     

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