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Thermaltake Announces Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Thermaltake Technology, a leading computer components and power solutions brand, is more than ever committed to create a uniquely innovative and adventurous enthusiasm of been "committed to creating the perfect User experience”. The New Thermaltake Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester designs for DIY enthusiast and PC gamers with a builder-friendly philosophy to enable you to test and diagnose the power supply’s condition before damage occurs. Further impressive features of the new Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester included oversized LCD panel that accurately shows the value of each specific power rails and sets the latest standard in fast, easy and accurate PSU Tester. With the innovative design and unique style, the Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester evokes the next-generation legendry and is the number one choice for PC DIY enthusiasts worldwide.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Superior performance with unbeatable compatibility
    Thermaltake Technology is eager to offer the perfect user experience and therefore design the product with excellent compatibility and flexibility for the users. The Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester particularly outstanding in this respect: supports every ATX power supply available today up to ATX12V v2.3 and also able to test every power supply output connector (SATA, PCI-Express, peripheral, Floppy and CPU connector) easily and accurately at the same time. With its manual/auto comprehensive testing flexibility, the Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester is a perfect addition for checking the health of your ATX power supplies.

    An indispensible tool for PC enthusiasts and gamers alike
    Despite so many options of the new Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester , for the user the decision is always very clear: the setting is made intuitively, and the programme selected is shown in the multifunction display as well as in very realistic, such as built-in alarm system and easily troubleshoots system etc. An intelligent feature includes it builds and upgrades fast and simple, thanks to the easy read oversized LCD panel and worry-free check button. It provides output connectors diagnostic system which easily for user to detect the exact cause of their power supply. Using an audible alarm system, the users will hear a beeping sound and the LCD will change from blue to red backlight or even no lights for critical checks. With the auto shutdown function, the Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester will automatically shut itself and the PSU down when it is in the middle of a test and no operation is performed.

    The new Thermaltake Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester which is exclusive to Thermaltake enables the development engineers to highlight and leverage optimisation refinement for the users, and to fulfill the mission of “delivering the perfect user experience”. The new Thermaltake Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester is now available from Thermaltake-authorized retailers worldwide in August, 2011.

    For more information, visit the product page.
    cadaveca and sttubs say thanks.
  2. mtosev

    mtosev New Member

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    Handy device. I hope that the price will be <50eur
  3. Th3pwn3r

    Th3pwn3r

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    Neat. However, the main reason power supplies fail is too much heat which is usually due to dust bunnies or bad fans OR power surges from women running the blow dryer, microwave and Pizzazz all at once. Well, at least in my experience.
  4. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    What??? No amperage values? That's a bummer. Could be handy if a PSU is suspect, but only if it's under $20.

    I can't stand the marketing crap that TT uses, why can't they cut to to the chase and tell specifically what the unit does for the user and what it measures.
  5. Bo$$

    Bo$$ Lab Extraordinaire

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    well it is not a stress tester, merely tells you if the PSU is working or not, and if voltages are in spec or not
  6. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Yea, more like a "stupid" light on your dashboard telling you your engine is running or not.

    Most motherboards have input line voltage monitoring built-in and visible through the BIOS. Which is more accurate?
  7. Maban

    Maban

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    On-board sensors can be incredibly unreliable and really should never be trusted completely.
  8. Jstn7477

    Jstn7477

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    This may be handy to check voltages to see if they are anything close to normal, but I think of these as more of a gimmick than an actual test. The PSU must be under load to get accurate voltage measurements, and a plastic dongle can't do that, so that's where a real computer + multimeter are useful. This could be useful, however, if you want to make sure that the PSU isn't going to put 90V through your system before you plug it in, and burning out the dongle is a much better option in that case.
    Sasqui says thanks.
    Crunching for Team TPU More than 25k PPD
  9. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    I've heard that about temp sensors, but not voltage sensors. I have witnessed a BIOS setting for CPU voltage be significantly lower than what CPUz reports (assuming CPUz is using onboard voltage monitoring sensors, and is correct)

    So I have to ask if you can provide any imperical data or tests? Not trying to flame, just wondering where the evidence is, then I'll shut up :)

    The question is... which is more reliable, a TT product or motherboard voltage sensors?
  10. Maban

    Maban

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    I'm actually waiting on a multimeter from someone. Don't know when he's going to be in town next though. Would be the perfect empirical evidence you need since we have the same motherboard, provided the measurements agree. I've been wanting to see if my motherboard's sensors are correct for quite some time.
  11. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    Price needs to be sub $20, or else it's pointless as I have a PSU tester that does all the same things I purchased form Fry's for $13
  12. Bo$$

    Bo$$ Lab Extraordinaire

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    probabily this as it will be calibrated correctly, the difference is that for instance your PC wont strat you can see if the PSU is working or not rather using this device rather than swapping everything out and then be stumped why it is still not working
  13. @RaXxaa@ New Member

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    Isint there a device superior to this called the multimeter?
  14. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    Check out some extreme OCing threads at XS. They use multimeters to read voltages during benches because the boards' sensors are not accurate.

    And why would anyone buy this when they can just buy a multimeter?
  15. scaminatrix

    scaminatrix

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    At least it looks more sturdy than their last one. I've got one here, and it feels like it's going to break every time I use it. Very flimsy.
  16. SetsunaFZero

    SetsunaFZero

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    Coz a good beginner multimeter is bout 150+€ i would only use Fluke and Voltcraft ones.
  17. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    First off, a generic multimeter is still more versatile and at least as accurate as this, while costing about the same.

    And it's not exactly like all generic ones are absolutely horribly inaccurate. My $20 Wal-Mart special is exactly as accurate as my friend's $200 Fluke. They both read everything absolutely identically. His is just built better, and has provisions to be professionally calibrated, whilst mine is cheap plastic, and can't be calibrated.

    Besides, even if it isn't as accurate, there is simply no need for a Fluke or Voltcraft to test power supplies and basic household stuff.

    If I was doing mission critical work, yeah, I'd spring for the Fluke (even despite mine being as accurate as it is. It's better safe than sorry in a case like that.), but for home use it's completely unnecessary, and the generic one is still better than this thing that Thermaltake is selling.
  18. twilyth Guest

    But don't forget that there are some people such as moi who only know enough to use their multimeters for testing AA batteries. Well, I can also test ohms and continuity for AC, but that's about it. :)
  19. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    Then you can also use it to test everything this device does. Positive on positive, negative on negative, take your voltage reading. Done.
  20. Scrizz

    Scrizz

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    I have a multimeter and a PSU tester thingy.
    It's much faster to use the PSU tester.
    especially if you're testing a whole bunch of them.
    PLus, it's easier to show someone how to use it.
    at least that's what I've found in my experience.
    ;)
    YMMV
  21. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    If you are testing a whole bunch of them, it's most likely a job related thing, and you likely have access to better psu testers than this.
  22. Scrizz

    Scrizz

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    like?
    :)
  23. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    Don't know. I don't test psus for a living.

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