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Ultrahigh-energy proton looks like a black disk

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Drone, Dec 17, 2011.

  1. Drone

    Drone

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    The new findings provide the first experimental evidence that a proton becomes a black disk as its energy approaches asymptopia.

    Even protons hold some mystery :wtf:

    To shed some light on this they accelerate protons to a speed near the speed of light and smash them.

    Relativity still rocks. I never thought about elastic and inelastic collision of protons :eek:

    This experiment has also some more practical value:

    [​IMG]

    This figure shows two protons crossing each other at the LHC at an impact parameter, b. Because of their velocity near the speed of light, the protons are contracted to thin disks. An analysis of the proton-proton cross section suggests that high-energy protons are black disks.

    http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-12-physicists-ultrahigh-energy-proton-black-disk.html
     
    Jack Doph says thanks.
  2. Drone

    Drone

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    First photo of shadow of single atom

    bump

    Another awesome discovery. A picture of the shadow casted by a single atom has been captured! :eek: A single atom! Would you ever imagine such extreme optical imaging? Atom was held in free space by electrical forces.

    [​IMG]

    They have reached the extreme limit of microscopy because it's impossible to see anything smaller than an atom using visible light.


    http://phys.org/news/2012-07-photo-shadow-atom.html
     
  3. Drone

    Drone

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    [​IMG]

    It's a nanographene molecule. In that image we can "see" the individual bonds between carbon atoms :eek: AFM does miracles.

    http://phys.org/news/2012-09-world-atomic-microscope-chemical-bonds.html
     

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