1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

Well, this seems odd.

Discussion in 'Motherboards & Memory' started by _JP_, Dec 7, 2013.

  1. _JP_

    _JP_

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,684 (1.63/day)
    Thanks Received:
    738
    Location:
    Portugal
    I've recently bought an ASRock FM2A75 Pro4 motherboard, except I haven't found the time to assemble the parts yet. So I was checking the board out, when I noticed that there seems to be glue residue along the edges where the back-plate makes contact with the motherboard.
    It has been a good while since I've last assembled an AMD system (in fact, this is my first FM2 assembly, even though I know that the system is the same since AM2) and the last few used the stock cooler, so I didn't even notice this sort of thing.
    Now I'm reluctant to use my SD963 in this board...until the warranty period isn't over anyway. And even then. I don't want those SMDs on the back of the board to jump off...
    My question is, is it glue, or some sort of replacement for dampening foam?

    EDIT: Upon further inspection and better analysis, it seems to be a plastic-based residue that is there to make sure the metal back-plate doesn't come in contact with the board, avoiding shorts...meh. Got scared for a second there. Still, is it sticky (meaning I have to twitch it a bit to take it off), or does it lack adherence?
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
  2. BiggieShady

    BiggieShady

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,005 (1.02/day)
    Thanks Received:
    341
    Location:
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Looking at this photo it seems it's used instead of stand-offs
    [​IMG]
     
    _JP_ says thanks.
  3. _JP_

    _JP_

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,684 (1.63/day)
    Thanks Received:
    738
    Location:
    Portugal
    Yup, that's more or less the amount of whatever that is mine has.
     
  4. micropage7

    micropage7

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Messages:
    5,930 (3.55/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,375
    Location:
    Jakarta, Indonesia
    better test it first
    i had the same thing when i bought 8600gt
    if its clear and sticky it glue, i dunno where they came from
     
  5. _JP_

    _JP_

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,684 (1.63/day)
    Thanks Received:
    738
    Location:
    Portugal
    I guess I'll unscrew it and see if it falls-off.
    If it doesn't, I will try to wiggle it a bit. If it still sticks, I'll need a new cooler.
     
  6. de.das.dude

    de.das.dude Pro Indian Modder

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,780 (4.89/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,058
    i was about to say its not glue, but some sort of plastic. mould burrs from the insulaton of the back plate. it was there on my board as well.
    but it falls off with a bit of persuasion. nothing to worry.
    grats on the purchase.
     
  7. _JP_

    _JP_

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,684 (1.63/day)
    Thanks Received:
    738
    Location:
    Portugal
    Wouldn't it make more sense for the back-plate to be made out of plastic then?
    I mean, the brackets are made of plastic. And those get more use/heave to deal with more interventions than the back-plate...and stock coolers don't weigh that much.
    But I digress. I'll update this when I have new intel on the matter. /badpun
     
  8. de.das.dude

    de.das.dude Pro Indian Modder

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,780 (4.89/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,058
    the brackets are there for stock coolers, and the backplate is there for aftermarket coolers to prevent sagging.
    even with the stock cooler the function of the back plate is to prevent the socket area from sagging/buckling.
    the brackets can be plastic as they dont need to be that rigid, plus they can be thick, so stress is low. whereas there is no space at the back b/w the backplate and pcb, so they are forced to use metal.
     
  9. itsakjt

    itsakjt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,175 (0.80/day)
    Thanks Received:
    381
    Location:
    Kolkata, India
    You sure that is not soldering flux? Maybe the board was cleaned off flux after installing the backplate and so the flux remained in that portion.
     
  10. _JP_

    _JP_

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,684 (1.63/day)
    Thanks Received:
    738
    Location:
    Portugal
    Flux is is only present on solder joints/pads. The board itself is coated with a substance (which I don't remember the name) that repels solder/flux so that it only goes where it needs to.
    You're preaching to the choir.
    After-market coolers (if different enough) come with their own back-plates. Simple ones, that use the bundled back-plate usually don't weigh enough to sag the board.
    The system itself, as it is, look sturdy enough already. I'd say it's more than needed for stock cooling.
     
  11. de.das.dude

    de.das.dude Pro Indian Modder

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,780 (4.89/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,058
    its not just the weight, it puts a lot of tension and bending moments on the pcb like so.
    [​IMG]
    and the newer AMD stock coolers are REALLY REALLY tight, which is why the back plate is needed.

    red = cooler, black = socket and board.
    black arrows show force on socket and board
     
    _JP_ says thanks.
  12. itsakjt

    itsakjt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,175 (0.80/day)
    Thanks Received:
    381
    Location:
    Kolkata, India
    Excellent presentation there @de.das.dude . I remember board bending when I had my LGA 775 system which didn't have a back plate. Board was badly bent and it was permanent due to long term pressure of the stock cooler of the Pentium 4. Even after removing, I noticed significant bending.
     
  13. _JP_

    _JP_

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    2,684 (1.63/day)
    Thanks Received:
    738
    Location:
    Portugal
    It DID look like glue residue, but it was just a plastic layer to prevent shorts. Just like any other AMD board. :\
    Over-precaution and paranoia got over my judgement and common sense... -_-''
    Should know better...
     
  14. Jetster

    Jetster

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    5,086 (2.93/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,076
    Location:
    Oregon
    ASRock has some great functioning boards but they do get sloppy sometimes. I wouldn't worry about it
     

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page