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What do you use to cool your computer?

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by ex_reven, Sep 27, 2006.

  1. ex_reven New Member

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    What do you use to cool your computer? How do you rate its effectiveness? Cost Effective?

    CPU - Stock Intel Prescott Socket 775 Cooler

    Pros - Good for stock cooling, Easy Removal via thumbscrews, not ugly, not oversized, easy to clean

    Cons - Loud, not good at all for overclocking

    Case - 2 120mm no name case fans

    Pros - Keep the ambient internal temperature down, quiet, Quad Red LEDs for sexy goodness

    Cons - Not effective in hot external conditions

    EDIT: Im gonna try and use your responses to discern what is a effective aftermarket cooler so i can replace mine :)
     
  2. DR.Death

    DR.Death New Member

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    if u want to replace your cooler get a zalman artic cooler or a high end water system
     
  3. PVTCaboose1337

    PVTCaboose1337 Graphical Hacker

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    2 x 120mm + 90mm = Cool air on CPU, but lots of dust on the filters...
    CPU = AF64Pro = Cool, quite, overclocking friendly
     
  4. i_am_mustang_man New Member

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    does the AF64pro (or eq) work as well on 775 as 939? idk, but if it's anywhere comparable, go with that, because it's effin amazing. my comp is sitting at 28idle right now, and loads at 40C. that's not bad for a 30% OC too. but have it pointing to an exhaust fan cuz that will make the heat jump out of your case :D
     
  5. tigger

    tigger I'm the only one

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    with an arctic freezer7pro on my 775 D930@4050/1.35vcore,it keeps my temp at 41-43c idle and 53c max.

    pros-cheap,good for oc'ing

    cons-noisy at full tilt
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2006
  6. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

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    What says more about this thread? The current topic title "Your opinion" or the first sentence "What do you use to cool your computer?"

    I'll just stick with my opinion, I think my current work sucks so I decided to take a break and eat bread with chicken filet. In my opinion that's a great idea.

    In order to prevent other people to give their crappy opinions I'll change the topic title for you so it's a lot clearer, next time you may do this yourself.
     
  7. 144 and UP

    144 and UP New Member

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    I use the Evo33 to cool my Opt@2.88GHz temps are 31-33 idle 44 max. but is noisy when the fan is on full.
     
  8. pt

    pt not a suicide-bomber

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    i use the stock cooler on cpu and gfx, and i have:
    1x140mm (front) (no name)
    2x120mm (side) (noiseblocker XL2)
    1x120mm (rear) (no name)
    1x140mm (PSU) (outake)
    it is overclocked to 2700mhz at 53ºc under load :)

    Front and side - intake
    PSU and rear - outake
     
  9. LiLvi3tbOi69

    LiLvi3tbOi69 New Member

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    TRiCOD 8078 case..
    2 front intake 80mm and 2 back exhaust 80mm

    pros: good lookin..cheap
    cons: cooling a midtower with 4 80mm fans..i wouldnt say is too great


    AMD 3800 939 proessor

    pros: very fast, great price,
    cons: gets hot easilly.



    oh and..when u guys read ur temperatures.. do u guys use the CPU Diode temperature? or jsut the CPU temperature
     
  10. pt

    pt not a suicide-bomber

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    i use pc probe 2
     
  11. Azn Tr14dZ New Member

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    Case: Super Talent
    Front Intake 120mm 78CFM Fan
    Rear Exhaust 120mm 78CFM Fan
    Side Panel Intake 80mm 30CFM Fan (For RAM Modules)

    CPU Cooler: Thermaltake Big Typhoon
    2.8Ghz Idle: 33-35
    2.8Ghz Load: 44-46
     
  12. JC316

    JC316 Knows what makes you tick

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    CPU- Stock AMD. Cools eficently enough, plus it's quiet.

    Case- 120MM Raid Maxx rear exaust. 1 80MM front intake. 1 80mm side intake. It cools decent enough, I would like something a tad faster though.
     
  13. stevorob

    stevorob

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    Case - Lian-Li PC-61

    2x front intake
    1x top exhaust
    1x rear exhuast

    Stock AMD Cooler on Processor
    28-30C Idle @ 2.55Ghz
    49-51C Load @ 2.55Ghz

    ATI Silencer 5 on my X850XT
    35C Idle @ 618/620
    About 60C Load @ 618/620


    My room stays cool... we keep the AC cranked at like 70
     
  14. Protius New Member

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    Case- Thermaltake Armor
    1-120mm front intake
    1-25cm side intake
    1-120mm back exhaust
    1-90mm back exhaust
    1-90mm top exaust

    cpu-A64 freezer pro

    Video- Accelero X2's on both
    -with 1 90mm fan blowing on them, thank god for zip ties (these x1800's are hot little buggers)
     
  15. cdawall where the hell are my stars

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    top this dell optiplex gx100 no fans and the cpu cooler is smaller than what comes on most vidcards nowadays
    pros small, dead silent
    cons overclocking man thats funny :pimp:

    oh and my amd system is alot easier
    case ultra 4bay
    5x 80mm fans ~30crm for the silent ones and ~70cfm for the not so silent one:roll:
    temps 57C load 2.46ghz (stock amd hsf)
    pros very quiet wheni use my variable fan turned all the way down
    cons well its broken now so what do you think the cons are?
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2006
  16. Protius New Member

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    ^ thats the one and only thing i'll give to dell, they're frigin quiet
     
  17. ktr

    ktr

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    CPU: FX57
    COOLER: G/B G-Power Pro

    Pro: Good cooling; blue; nickle plated copper. kinda quite of low...
    Con: Doesnt matter if the speed is high or low...it performs the same; extremely loud on high.

    CASE: Antec Superlanboy
    FANS: Two 120mm fans

    Pro: Simple, effective cooling; when intake = outake means less dust inside unit
    Con: front one is only blue, rear has no led; a little loud...but doesnt matter.

    Memory: Cheap (unknown brand...lol...got it for free) Four 1gig Sticks pc3200 ddr.
    Cooling: Vantec Copper Heatsinks

    Pro: Makes cheap heatsink look expensive...lol
    Con: Memory doesnt usually overheat.

    VGA: x850 Pro Agp
    Cooling; Stock, but help with a Vantec PCI Fan (two 70mm fans)

    Pro: Cools card, and it blue. I just got it cause it was blue..
    Con: not as affective as a upgrade hs/f for the card.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2006
  18. ex_reven New Member

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    does anyone find that 80mm fans more efficient (blows more air because of faster rpm) but more noisy than 120mm?

    or is this just because some 80mm fans are cheap and some brand names are good?
     
  19. JC316

    JC316 Knows what makes you tick

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    I would agree with that statement, my two 80MM's pull more air than the big 120 in the back.

    YAY 500 POSTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  20. savillm

    savillm New Member

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    my case is a jeantech achilles with:

    120mm fan blowing air in from the front of my case

    120mm fan sucking air out the back of my case

    80mm fan on side blowing into case

    80mm fan on top blowing air out

    cpu cooler is a akasa AK-961 on a intel p4 with ht @ 3ghz

    ram cooling i got 2x Akasa AK-171 blue

    graphic card is stock cooling atm

    i dont overclock, is this cooling a ok or could it be better?
     
  21. ex_reven New Member

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    i dont believe cooling is required unless your current system is either noisy or hot...
    if its noisy you could increase/replace the cooling devices to meet the cooling requirements of your system...

    without overclocking, you can get away with using most stock components, after market cooling is only required for
    a) the cooling freak (obsessive cooling syndrome lol)
    b) hardware enthusiast/overclocker
    c) badly designed or inadequate cooling (eg a videocard that runs hot because it has no fan)
     
  22. Inventus New Member

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    Noiseless

    My workstation, equipped with a 2.8GHz P4 (HyperThreading) and a Radeon 9800, is able to run graphic-intensive games (such as Oblivion etc.) without any increase in noise. The noise level is about the same as a person whispering at the other end of a large room :)

    This is achieved by the following cooling solution:

    My LianLi case is equipped with a single 120mm Scythe (fluid-bearing, 800rpm) fan (which is noiseless, even when held close to the ear), as well as the 120mm fan in my 500W Seasonic PSU. No further fans are in the case. These provide a low, but necessary air-flow to any components not otherwise activly cooled, including the PSU, the voltage regulator, the passive heatsink on my chipset (Intel, so it doesn't get very hot) and the heatsinks on my paired RAM sticks (2x1Gb PC3200 CL2).

    My CPU and GPU and the two fluid-bearing harddisks are cooled by waterblocks. The GPU block (Innovatek, since AquaComputer was out of stock) also cover the VRAM and other GFX chips, which is important these days! The harddisk blocks are probably unnecessary and is primarily there to provide some additional cooling of the water, as the harddisks are mounted close to the air-intake.

    I use a Reserator 1 (old, blue model) to cool the water passively. On this I've mounted a RF1 (Reserator Fan), which is only started (by SpeedFan) when the CPU or GPU temperatures rise due to intensive gaming etc. When running at all (which is only after long periods of high load) I run it at just 25% to keep the noise down (allowing the game sounds to block it out).

    Since the pump inside the Reserator is apparantly mounted incorrectly (at least in the old model?) It broke after about a year. I've now mounted a MAG pump inside my case instead. Aside from providing a much higher waterflow, this pump also allow me to monitor the pump rpm, as it provides tacho-output through its fan-connector (I guess it could even be speed-regulated, only the motherboard connector I currently use doesn't allow this). I removed the old pump from the Reserator of course, to prevent it from restricting flow.

    Note that both the two harddisk water-blocks and the external fan on the Reserator aren't really necessary, except for very high performance hardware. As such I'm sure my system would run just fine without these (though I guess a PC with a faster CPU and one of the latest SLI GFX cards would likely need the Reserator FAN, especially if you want to overclock, which I personally find unnecessary).

    Beware that many motherboards only provide limited power-ratings for their fan-connectors, and as such it may be necessary for pumps using fan-conncetors (such as my MAG) to be connected using a molex-connector instead (be sure to use one with a tacho pass-through connector though,so you can monitor the pump). Such a connector was included with my MAG pump, but having an Intel motherboard, which provide 25 Watt on the CPU connector, I'm not using it.

    I can HIGHLY recommend water-cooling, especially using a passive (external) radiator, such as the Zalman Reserator or similar solutions available from various companies. Not only does it provide MUCH higher heat-removal than ANY air-based cooling solution, but it also prevents overheating to a much greater extent. As such, I can switch of my pump entirely for extended periods (up to one hour), without any components reaching critical temperatures. With the pump running, my CPU never goes beyond 45 deg.C. while my GPU will stay below 60 deg.C. (and this will likely get much lower, once I remount its waterblock using a proper thermal compound) These temperatures are WITHOUT the fan on the radiator running (with this at 100% the CPU stays below 40 deg.C.) And this is despite the fact that I still use the, rather poor, CPU water-block that was included with the Reserator 1.

    Another, seldom noted, benefit from water-cooling, is that it is CHEAP!!! This is not immediatly apparant, as a complete water-cooling solution is indeed somewhat more expensive than a similar air-cooling solution. However, the fact is that fans tend to have a limited life-span, especially if your PC isn't in a "clean-room" (moreso if you, like me, smoke a lot). The same, although to a lesser extent, can be said about the heatsinks, since these tend to get covered in dust and dirt, which can be difficult to remove completely (note that even a very thin layer of grime, not to mention tar and nicotine, will impair performance to an unexpected extent). On the other hand, most water-cooling equipment will run for years without any significant performance-reduction. Thus you will likely be able to re-use your water-cooling components through several hardware upgrade cycles, whereas most fans and heatsinks will have to be replaced on a yearly basis (or at least cleaned thoroughly).

    In relation to the above I want to note that I've not used the most expensive parts, by far. The conclusion is that you don't need the most expensive water-blocks, nor do you need a very powerful pump (my old one was 5W, the new one is about 18W) or a super-efficient radiator, in order to achieve better cooling than even the most expensive and high performance air-cooling solutions. This of course, unless you want to overclock your hardware to rediculous levels, in which case air-cooling isn't even an option.

    Also, in my experience, water-cooling is much easier to maintain, as you can get away with changing water once or twice a year (which is easy if you use an external reservoir, such as the Reserator). In fact I didn't change my water for more than two years, which is not recommended (lots of strange stuff in the water when I finally changed it), but this just shows how resilient water-cooling really is (my cooling-performance was only slightly lowered at the end, and probably more from the slowly dying Reserator pump than anything else). If you plan to change water at long intervals (ie. more than six months), I can highly recommend adding a few drops of whatever anti-corrosion and/or anti-algae fluid you use once in a while (say, every three months or so).

    The biggest surprise in this regard, was when I opened my case for the first time in two and a half years, only to find that not a single speck of dust had been deposited on my hardware components or inside the case. Being a heavy smoker, I'm used to seeing several centimeters of brownish dust and grime inside my previous air-cooled PCs, and that after just a few months of operation. I should mention that my current PC is the first to have any kind of air-filter (included with the LianLi case), but then again, I'm sure my old air-cooled PC wouldn't have liked this kind of "blockage", preventing the high air-flow necessary to keep its CPU below the 70+ deg.C. it used to run at!

    You will, of course, have to take care not to spill water onto your hardware, but even this isn't quite as difficult as it may sound, if you just take a little care when taking apart your system. In fact I once did a stupid thing, by blowing into the water-hose to empty it while forgetting that it was disconnected inside the case! Luckily only a few drops of water remained in the hose, and neither my motherboard nor my GFX card seem to suffer from the shower (I made sure to wipe them off and let them dry before restoring power of course). To prevent damage to the expensive components, should this kind of "accident" happen again, I've now purchased a special cooling-fluid which isn't electrically conductive. Since I've yet to exchange my water with this, rather expensive, fluid, I can't say if it is as good as water (few fluids are better than pure water, when it comes to removing heat!)

    I hope my experience will encourage some of you to go for a water-cooled solution the next time you decide to upgrade your PC. Nowadays you can even get quite cheap, completely factory-sealed, water-kits, where you don't ever have to change the water and which should be as easy to mount as your average heatsink+fan kit (just don't expect these ready-to-run kits to be nearly as effective as a system you put together yourself!)

    I certainly know that I'm NEVER going back to those noisy, short-lived and unreliable fans. Rather I plan to water-cool my fileserver as well, even though it isn't placed in my living room like my workstation and therefore doesn't need to be as quiet. Still, just to get the peace-of-mind and increased cooling-performance, I plan to use the old water-cooling parts for the server, when I decide to upgrade my workstation.
     
  23. ktr

    ktr

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    80 feels like they blow more are because its a more contentrated airflow. 120 can do the same job, cover a higher area, with less rpm and noise. to prove this concept, slap a 80to120 adapter on a 120mm fan. i have one of those silverstone 120mm fans on my other comp that can push 110cfm, and 3-4 times quieter than the tornados.
     
  24. Inventus New Member

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    If you want decent airflow and very low noise, try a Scythe S-FLEX fan. These actually DO have the same bearing technology as modern harddisks (ie. fluid-dynamic).

    Be advised though, that the 800rpm one moves very little air (but it's SILENT, even if you use it to shave the hair in your ears!) The higher-rpm ones should move a more decent volume of air, while still being very quiet.

    Linkage: http://www.scythe-usa.com/product/acc/002/sflex_detail.html

    Btw. ktr is right, take it from someone who have read a lot of thermofluid litterature! A 120mm fan will, everything else being equal, move more air with less noise than a similar 80mm fan.

    Aside from the reason that ktr so correctly states, for why you might expeirence otherwise (larger flow area = less "windspeed", which is why it's quiter btw.) other reasons include differences in the construction of the fan-blades and/or the DC-motor, as well as the type of bearings used.

    A cheap way to prevent fan noise, is to purchase high-flow fans, and then run these at less-than full speed, such as 50-90%. (You'll be surprised how much a mere 10% speed reduction have to say for some fans!)

    However, do NOT expect a fan to be quiet, if you use your motherboard to regulate its speed!!!

    Most motherboards use PWM (pulse-width modulation) to regulate the DC voltage supplied to its fans. This will cause most fans (especially cheaper ones) to emit a very annoying "buzz" or "ticking-noise".

    This is easy to remedy, at least if you aren't afraid of doing a little soldering (buy two or three large electrolytic capacitors, say 3 x 2000nF, and connect these in parallel with the fan, making sure the polarity is correct). To make this work even better (notably at very low speeds), you may be able to increase the PWM frequency, using SpeedFan or similar (default is typically around 10Hz. Setting it somewhat higher, say 50-100Hz should smooth the voltage even further, allowing your fan to operate more efficiently and without any PWM noise!)

    For most people though, it will be much easier to simply buy a fan-regulator (one that does NOT use PWM of course!) Even if this doesn't allow you to use software or the BIOS to regulate the fans (at least not without re-introducing the PWM noise).
     
  25. pt

    pt not a suicide-bomber

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    Noyseblocker fans are very good too :)
     

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