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Why Build? Why not Prebuild? Verbal Ammo :P

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by GLeN, Dec 6, 2007.

  1. GLeN New Member

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    I know the answer is obvious, I would rather build my own system than to buy one that is prebuilt. But its my parents that need some understanding. I showned the components that are all top range and cost around £500 gbp in total but instead I get a prebuild packardbell pc that has half the specs with rubbish components thrown in my face :banghead:

    So I would like to show how easy they are too build and why they are better

    Any suggestions? Like how easy is it to put everything together etc and whats bad about prebuilt pcs.

    Thanks

    Merry Christmas :toast:
  2. happita

    happita

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    Obviously the common answer is because its cheaper to build. But also because YOU are in control of what you want to put inside your system. Some popular computer companies like dell and gateway sometimes have default stuff in their cases, and it might add on value that is not necessarily needed for the purpose you buy your machine for. Also, its just better to build yourself because you start to learn the about the hardware in the machine more so versus a person who buys a prebuilt system. It motivates you to be more knowledgeable. Any hardware mishap that occurs, you might be able to diagnose it yourself and make the proper changes so that it is fixed, for FREE rather than taking it to someone you don't know and paying a premium.
    GLeN says thanks.
  3. happita

    happita

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    GLeN says thanks.
  4. Hawk1 New Member

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    Not only that, but prebuilts sometimes have proprietary things that make it more difficult/more expensive to upgrade in the future. One example is Dell's propreitary Motherboard ATX connector. If you want to change the MB in the future, you have to change the PSU as well, and vice versa.
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  5. Grings

    Grings New Member

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    show them parts with 3year or lifetime warranties, you're far more covered if anything goes wrong than you would be with a prebuilt pc, unless you spend a good few hundred £ more on an extended warranty
    GLeN says thanks.
  6. PVTCaboose1337

    PVTCaboose1337 Graphical Hacker

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    That is quite correct. It is alot easier just to build your own because it is:

    Cheaper
    Fun
    You see what goes in
    You care about it more, so you won't be as likely to break it
    Customizable per person... each is unique
    Warranty is better, if one component breaks, you dont send back the whole PC.
    GLeN says thanks.
  7. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    Here's one...
    Upgradable. Most pc manufactures use propriatary hardware. Remember Dell's PSUs and mobos with a switched wire?
    GLeN says thanks.
  8. Basard

    Basard

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    When did they start putting proprietary connectors on dells? The Dell my friend bought less than a year ago has a normal power connector (physically normal), although it was only a 300w psu, the system worked fine with a 7950GT in it. It's a BTX system though, have fun upgrading that. He ended up pretty much buying a whole new computer, now he has two. So it's not like it was the PSU's power connector that was at fault. It was the BTX case, Lack of PSU connectors in general, lack of PSU wattage, and the heatsink they put on the CPU was a complete joke--IMPOSSIBLE to upgrade.

    Dells are actually pretty cheap, considering all the stuff you get, they are still junk though. Pretty much any major OEM brand like Dell are not very upgradable. You can add RAM to them, and MAYBE another HD, if your case has the room, normally you can put a sound card, and a modest video card. But the PSU's they come with are pretty much rated to barely run the equipment that they hold.

    Sounds like your pretty much screwed with a packard bell... If only your parents had more faith in you, hahaha. 768Mb of ram in your system specs?! AND a celeron D?! The only thing good about your system is that it probably came with a monitor--although your monitor probably is sub-par as well. Consider that computer "your mom's computer," get a job, and get your own system going, lol. My mom did the same thing to me, with the purchase of a compaq presario back in 1998... THAT computer had ONBOARD ram--32MB (upgradable to 64!!).

    Oh yeah, and as far as how easy it is to put them together. You pretty much CANT plug something into the wrong spot.... Just look at any computer and see where the wires go man, it's almost self-explanatory these days. If all else fails, just read your motherboard manual (if you want a good manual, get an Asus, or something name brand. Remember, name brand components are expensive for a reason, they usually come with all the stuff to make it easy to put together. If you get cheap stuff, you'll just end up scratching your head all day trying to figure it out (depending on your level of expertise).
    GLeN says thanks.
  9. GLeN New Member

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    Thanks guys. Ill use your advice when shes in a good mood :laugh: Installing an os seems basic enough even though I havent installed one, but i may reinstall windows for practise lol

    Whats the main thing when owning a new pc made up from scratch? Drivers etc DO you download the most recent ones from the site. Or is it all self explantory If any one could walkme through things like this either on msn or here I would be well smug :cool: I ask a lot of questions because More questions the better imo just incase :rockout:
  10. JacKz5o New Member

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    Cheaper, upgradable, higher quality hardware.. the list goes on :)

    Most of the hardware's drivers will come with the hardware itself in a CD. Sometimes the drivers might be outdated so you might want to check for an update on the hardware company's website.
  11. Steevo

    Steevo

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    I am in the build camp, however sometimes a prebuilt comes with software and other hardware that makes it a good deal. If you are not looking for top of the line newest hardware look at barebones systems. They have always worked well for me when building frineds and other people computer systems.
    10 Million points folded for TPU
  12. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    It is considerably cheaper to build your own system. For instance, Dell wants $339 for a 500GB hard drive. I can get one at newegg for about $119.

    However, there are advantages to prebuilts like a single point for troubleshooting and part replacement. Most Dell's come with on-site repair in the warranty.

    The key here is that "you would rather build your own". The knowledge gained from researching, buying, building and configuring your own rig will save you countless hours of frustration in the future and save you loads of cash by not having to pay someone to troubleshoot and repair it.
  13. Basard

    Basard

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    Ok, I got my biostar motherboard, went to the website, THE GLOBAL website (the one your supposed to get drivers from), and the HD audio drivers they had were COMPLETE junk, kept giving me errors and stuff, wouldnt even give me any sound.

    The best place to get drivers for your onboard devices are from the actual chip manufactureres. I went to Realteks website and got the HD drivers from there, and they worked perfectly. I got my nForce drivers from nvidia, and they work. Although I could have done without the extra unnecessary junk, like Network Access Manager. But always go to the actual chip manufacturers websites to get the drivers.

    Yeah, barebones are good, sometimes, just make sure you know what MOTHERBOARD they come with, thats one of the most important parts of the computer, if its junk, you may as well get a dell, hehe. Some barebone systems these days actually come with socket 754 motherboards, or 939, thats why they are so cheap. Watch out for that junk man.
  14. Woah Mama! New Member

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    Once you build your first computer you never go back to paying double price to have someone put it together for you. That and Dell/HP/Compaq motherboards suck ASS.

    Easy to build? Well you could mention that at least one user on this forum alone built their first computer when they were 12. So why do you need to pay some guy at Dell, or even worse pay a robot to tighten a few screws, plug in a few components and then put the lid back on? So to speak.
  15. imperialreign

    imperialreign New Member

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    hand built systems also have a better potential for overclocking. A lot of the run-o-tha-mill Gateway, Dell, and eMachines systems have non-cnofigurable BIOS' . . . which doesn't give you much head room when you're trying to get just a tad more performance and life out of dating components.

    Air flow within a lot of per-built systems is also sub-par. mATX cases are horrible and lead to a lot of heat. Most manufacturers don't like the spacious, roomy cases - they're big, (sometimes) heavy, and take up more room in the warehouse. Hand built systems usually have the ability to run much cooler than pre-builts. You have a better selection of coolers, and aren't stuck with the stock cooler that accompanies a new CPU - which is where I've seen a lot of pre-builts cop out with.

    Better hardware support - if something goes wrong with a pre-built, you usually have to go back to the PC manufacturer, and customer support for Gateway, HP, Dell, etc is usually sub-par because they deal all day with a lot of people that aren't too up on their systems. If something fails, you might end up stuck waiting for them to send out a local technician to have a look at it and validate the problem before they decide to fix it, and then it could take weeks before you get a piece of hardware back. Not to mention, but, if you upgrade or change components on a pre-built system . . . there's a good chance that the manufacturer will no longer warranty any other component (it depends on the manu). If you buy everything seperately, each component has a warranty no matter what it gets paired up with, and individual hardware manufacturers are usually a little quicker about handling hardware complaints.
  16. grunt_408

    grunt_408

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    There is also the satisfaction of building it yourself.
    And you know it has been done right.
  17. GLD

    GLD

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    Build over buy any day. The argument for building could be that you could use that knowledge to build pc's to earn $. :toast:
  18. Basard

    Basard

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    My friends dell came with ONE 120MM fan, and this was by FAR the WORST 120mm fan I've ever seen. It was in the front/center of the case, and blew over the massive aluminum heatsink on the CPU. The cpu heatsink doesn't even have its own friggan fan. And the 7300LE upgrade that cost him 100 bucks, that card ran at over 100c pretty much constantly. The same card at newegg cost 40 bucks--EIGHT MONTHS AGO.
  19. GLeN New Member

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    thanks a bunch guys :toast: I think Ill get her to drop into pc world or curries with me so we can have a look at the monitors because them shops offer credit, so the monitor can be paid off. Then the pc would be bought in separates. I dunno why but i get excited when i think of the pc not taking 20 secs to load up the start menu :rockout:
  20. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    my com puter takes about 20seconds too boot from a powerdown....and what is this startmenu laggyness you speak of? i touch mine and their is no lag at all click open simple hell it doesnt even take a sec to load the pictures their already their.....


    <--------------

    ahhh a build computer hand made for spedd just by ME


    ;)
  21. GLeN New Member

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    I mean when you click the start button this laptop, specs worse than my broken pc takes about 20 seconds to load.
  22. Chewy

    Chewy New Member

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    I gotta quote that.. and if you have any problems building installing drivers elc which is all sooo simple stuff to do once you do it once.. if you use the stock cooler you wont even need to learn to apply tim properly.. atm in my new build (in avatar) Im using the stock cooler until I get it up and running than Im going to learn how to install my water cooling parts.. just take your time and tpu will always be here for you.. they solved any problems Ive had in the past.

    Tim (thermal paste) is not hard to apply but to get it perfect you might have to reapply it a couple times before you get good at it and get it perfectly even spread/cores at the same temp.
  23. JrRacinFan

    JrRacinFan Served 5k and counting ...

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    GLeN, How much did your parents pay for the prebuilt packard bell?

    What if told you I built mine with a little bit better specs for around $250 USD.

    EDIT: Granted my motherboard stinks, I bought it off ebay for $20.
  24. GLeN New Member

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    1000 usd! :D

    Sry for bringin back old thread

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