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would clamping a CPU in a vice be save?

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by hat, Mar 1, 2009.

  1. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    I'm thinking about lapping my CPU but I was wondering how I would keep it still. Would clamping it in a vice be safe? If not, what other meathods could I use? I wouldn't be using extreme pressure like someone would when they're bending metal, just enough to keep it in place when I'm sanding it.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  2. red268

    red268

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    Tape down the sandpaper and hold the CPU. Sounds much safer to me.
    Some come in a small plastic retainer, so you could leave it in that to avoid bending pins.
  3. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    I'm worried about bending the pins though. If I just hold it I'm sure some pins are going to be bent. If I could just clamp it in a vice there would be no chance of bending the pins.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  4. oily_17

    oily_17

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    As red said..get a piece of glass and tape the sandpaper to it and then hold the CPU in your hand and apply the pressure down on the glass while moving the CPU up and down the paper.
    hat says thanks.
  5. red268

    red268

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    I edited about leaving it in the plastic, so you probably didn't see it yet.
    Also, you could put some card or something inside the plastic, in order to make sure you don't end up sanding the plastic as well. Like a spacer.
    hat says thanks.
  6. rampage

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    dont clamp it. as said, tape down the sand paprer (wet n dry) to a flat surface, eith a thick piece of glass or a mrbale surface and huse you hand to fold the cpu and/or heat sink.. dont apply too much pressure just a gently pressure, prity much let the weight of the cpu do the work
    hat says thanks.
  7. The Haunted

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    Use the foam pad that came with the cpu to protect the pins and use tape to secure it.
    It is recomended to rub the cpu on a flat surface. I doubt using tools would do a good job...
  8. red268

    red268

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    Yeah, even better than the card spacer.
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  9. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    I don't have the plastic the cpu came in anymore. So I should clamp the flast surface in the vice and grind the cpu over the surface on it?
    Crunching for Team TPU
  10. oily_17

    oily_17

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    If using a vice you would need to make sure the jaws are square so that the CPU will not fall out of the vice when you apply pressure.....I still would not do this though.
    hat says thanks.
  11. red268

    red268

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    Personally, I wouldn't put my CPU in a vice, however careful I was feeling that day.

    I'd tape the sandpaper down, put on some thin surgical gloves and rub the CPU over the sandpaper. (Gloves to stop you sanding your fingers!!)

    Perhaps use some polystrene or something to hold the CPU with? Should be gentle enough to avoid bending pins, but firm enough to hold it steady. Might want to cut out a small slot for the CPU.

    Also, check out this thread: http://forums.techpowerup.com/showthread.php?t=86602
    hat says thanks.
  12. Urbklr

    Urbklr

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    I lapped my PII last weekend. I just tapped the sandpaper down and held the cpu. I was worried about the pins too, but was surprised that I could hold it very sturdy with pressure and have the pins not bend.
    hat says thanks.
  13. erocker

    erocker Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't worry about bending the pins. You want to use light pressure when lapping it anyways, let the weight of the processor do the work.
    hat says thanks.
  14. KieranD

    KieranD

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    when sanding get a small cuboid block of wood and wrap the sand paper around it and then hold the cpu in your hand and sand away

    dont rub the cpu on the paper do the opposite and move the paper

    [​IMG]
    the marked section is the sand/glass paper
    just tear a bit off a big sheet and then replace when it starts to wear away or tear

    apply as little or as much pressure as needed "in this job there is no pressure... in brazil there is pressure to win world cup"
    hat says thanks.
  15. nafets New Member

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    This is a poor way of lapping, as your contact sanding surface (a wood block) isn't anywhere near flat.

    You should be using an extremely flat (or as close to it as possible), stationary sanding surface, so your lapped surface (the CPU) ends up flatter than it was before.

    Try using old storm windows, large untextured glass cutting boards, large glass mouse pads, even an old mirror.

    Securely tape your sandpaper to the glass surface (and the glass surface to a table, if it's not stationary on it's own), and lap away.

    PS. There should never be a thought or action that includes the words "CPU" and "vice" in the same instance. Just give up on that idea if you value your processor at all...
    hat says thanks.
  16. 1Kurgan1

    1Kurgan1 The Knife in your Back

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    Yes, I don't think anyone got you clearly on this one. If you don't have anything stationary or are worried about whatever you use moving. Then take that block of wood (just an example) put sandpaper around it. Then clamp that wood in the vice so you know it isn't moving and run the processor over that sandpaper.
    hat says thanks.
  17. lemonadesoda

    lemonadesoda

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    Very strong advice:

    Clamp the sanding surface (paper). Best thing is to tape sandpaper (actually, it isnt sand paper at all but very fine grit) to a piece of glass. You can even tape it to the WINDOW, and lap in the vertical direction.

    Put your CPU in the black insulating foam (to protect the pins), and move the CPU over the gritpaper. Move the SMALLER item over the larger flat surface to ensure the sanding is flat.

    It is wrong to move the LARGER corkblock over the CPU. That will definitely result in rounded corners over the CPU.
    hat says thanks.
  18. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    Cool, so all I have to do is look like an idiot for a few hours with sandpaper taped to my window and I'll be good to go.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  19. 1Kurgan1

    1Kurgan1 The Knife in your Back

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    Be careful up on a window, since it might be hard to keep equal pressure. It's harder to do that on a vertical surface than it is on a horizontal surface. Thats why you will see autobody shops always sanding on horizontal surfaces. Would probaby be a better bet to tape it down to a table or desk, plus then you can sit while you work!

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