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Intel to Launch Just Two LGA1150 "Broadwell" Parts

In what could be a sign of Intel being stuck with "undigested" Core "Haswell" inventories, BGA chips becoming commonplace for desktop platforms that don't see CPU upgrades, or even "Broadwell" being too short a stopgap between "Haswell" and "Skylake," the company has reportedly decided to launch just two socket LGA1150 Core "Broadwell" parts, when the silicon hits the market towards June.

Built in the 14 nm silicon fab process, "Broadwell" will bring about performance/Watt increments, and Intel doesn't appear to be in the mood to trade those in for higher clock speeds (higher performance out of the box). It's relevant to note here, that the "Broadwell" core is essentially an optical shrink of the "Haswell" CPU architecture to 14 nm, much like "Ivy Bridge" was to "Sandy Bridge," even if the silicon seating the cores itself is much different (meatier iGPU). Intel will be going in with just two parts, both of which are unlocked, for PC enthusiasts to chew on. These include the Core i7-5775C and the Core i5-5675C.

AMD Announces FreeSync, Promises Fluid Displays More Affordable than G-SYNC

AMD today officially announced FreeSync, an open-standard technology that makes video and games look more fluid on PC monitors, with fluctuating frame-rates. A logical next-step to V-Sync, and analogous in function to NVIDIA's proprietary G-SYNC technology, FreeSync is a dynamic display refresh-rate technology that lets monitors sync their refresh-rate to the frame-rate the GPU is able to put out, resulting in a fluid display output.

FreeSync is an evolution of V-Sync, a feature that syncs the frame-rate of the GPU to the display's refresh-rate, to prevent "frame tearing," when the frame-rate is higher than refresh-rate; but it is known to cause input-lag and stutter when the GPU is not able to keep up with refresh-rate. FreeSync works on both ends of the cable, keeping refresh-rate and frame-rates in sync, to fight both page-tearing and input-lag.

MSI Launches New mini-PC - Cubi

MSI proudly announces the latest and smallest mini-PC to date: the MSI Cubi. This tiny desktop is built on a concept of nifty technology and a brilliant design to suit the needs of both consumers and businesses.

Thanks to the implementation of a wide range of Intel processors, users can benefit from a powerful handheld-size PC, also capable of carrying multiple modular hard disks that provide a large base for data storage. MSI Cubi is mountable to a wall by VESA standards or can be combined with an HDTV, so the user can enjoy Ultra High-Definition and high quality media entertainment at home.

For commercial applications, Cubi also comes with Intel vPro technology, ensuring a safe and easily manageable working environment. With plenty of ports to connect to external devices, Cubi is the essence of small, smart computing. A black and a white version of the MSI Cubi are globally available by end of March 2015.

TechPowerUp GPU-Z 0.8.2 Released

TechPowerUp released the latest version of GPU-Z, the popular video hardware information and diagnostic utility. Version 0.8.2 brings with it a vast number of changes, support for new hardware, and bug-fixes. To begin with, the user-interface of GPU-Z received a major update, with the addition of a "Lookup" button that takes you to our GPU Database page corresponding to your GPU. The app can now tell you if your drivers are WHQL-signed. GPU manufacturer logos are updated.

Among the new hardware supported includes NVIDIA GeForce TITAN-X, GTX 980M, GTX 970M, GGTX 965M, GTX 845M, GTX 760 Ti OEM, GTX 660 (960 shaders), GT 705, GT 720, GT 745M, NVS 310, and Grid; AMD Radeon R9 255, FirePro W7100, HD 8370D, AMD R9 M280X, and R9 M295X; and Intel "Broadwell" integrated graphics. Specifications are revised for GeForce GTX 970.

A large number of bugs were fixed, and overall usability improved, including notably GPU-Z now supports Windows 10. We implemented a new working way of extracting BIOS from NVIDIA GPUs on systems with WIndows 8 and higher, to avoid a system hang. A large number of bugs were fixed, and overall usability of the app improved, as detailed in the change-log.
DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z 0.8.2 | GPU-Z 0.8.2 ASUS ROG-themed

The Change-log follows.

Logic Supply Unveils Next Generation Industrial NUC

Industrial and embedded computer manufacturer Logic Supply has released a preview of their upcoming ML100 ultra-small form factor industrial PC, combining the compact power of Intel's NUC platform with a ruggedized enclosure. The preview page features product highlights and images of the new system and its unique design features.

"The ML100 is designed to take the NUC places it's never been," said Logic Supply Engineer Hans Brakeley. "In creating the ML100 we wanted to highlight what's made the NUC so successful, its impressive size to performance ratio, and incorporate the features that make Logic Supply computers so unique, their proven industrial reliability. The result is a small form factor industrial PC that's powerful, energy efficient and specifically engineered to stand up to the dust, harsh environments, shock and vibration that our commercial clients face on a daily basis. It also doesn't hurt that it looks so good."

ASUS Announces BIOS Updates for 5th Gen Core Processor Support

ASUS today announced that all 9 Series motherboards offer support for 5th-generation Intel Core processors, assuring a quick, safe, and smooth upgrade - immediately. The easy-to-use ASUS USB BIOS Flashback or BIOS Updater tools enable users to update the UEFI BIOS quickly, unleashing the great performance of the latest high-performance CPUs.

ASUS 9 Series motherboards that include the renowned ASUS USB BIOS Flashback feature enable users to apply UEFI BIOS updates with incredible ease. This innovative tool downloads the latest BIOS to a USB flash drive, enabling users to update the award-winning ASUS UEFI BIOS quickly and easily. The motherboard does not even need to have a CPU or DRAM modules in place: users can simply connect the power supply, plug in their USB drive, press the USB BIOS Flashback or Reset button and then sit back and wait - there's nothing else to do.

Intel to Launch Socketed "Broadwell" Processors in mid-2015

Along the sidelines of GDC 2015, Intel offered a few details on how the year could look for its desktop processor lineup. The company is preparing to launch socketed Core "Broadwell" processors in mid-2015 (late Q2 or early Q3), likely in the sidelines of Computex 2015. Broadwell is an optical shrink of "Haswell" to the new 14-nanometer silicon fab process, with a minor feature-set update, much in the same way as "Ivy Bridge" was an optical shrink of "Sandy Bridge" to the 22 nm process.

The socketed Core "Broadwell" chips could come in the LGA1150 package, running on existing 8-series and 9-series chipset motherboards, with BIOS updates. The optical shrink seems to be working wonders for the silicon. Quad-core chips based on "Broadwell" could come with TDP rated as low as 65W (and we're not talking about the energy-efficient "S" or "T" brand extensions here). Some dual-core variants in the series may even be based on the smaller Core M "Broadwell" silicon, which physically features just 2 cores (and isn't a bigger quad-core silicon with two cores disabled in what's a colossal waste of rare-earth metals on a production scale). Some of those dual-core parts could come with TDP rated as low as 28W.Source: TechReport

Intel Readies 4K-ready NUC NUC5i7RYH Desktop

With 4K-ready media center PCs upon us, Intel decided to equip one of its next-gen NUC (next unit of computing) desktops with one of its most powerful integrated graphics solutions, which can either accelerate 4K video, 1080p to 4K upscaling GPU algorithms (think MadVR), or make for a reasonably fast 720p or 900p gaming machine. The NUC5i7RYH from Intel features a Core i5-5557U processor, which integrates Iris 6100 Graphics. Based on the "Broadwell-GT3" silicon, Iris 6100 offers 48 execution units, between 300 and 1100 MHz GPU core frequency, and an L4 eDRAM cache. A passive cooling solution deals with this 28W TDP chip. Other specs include two DDR3-1866 SO-DIMM slots, supporting up to 16 GB of memory, HDMI 1.4a and DisplayPort 1.2 display-outputs, four USB 3.0 ports, including one high-current port.
Sources: FanlessTech, NotebookCheck

First Core i7 Powered Intel NUC Incoming

Intel's revolutionary NUC (next unit of computing) ultra-compact desktop, which set out to offer performance rivaling desktops ten times its size, was traditionally limited to Core i5 chips at the top-end. Intel wants to change that, and is giving final touches to the first NUC to feature a Core i7 processor, and one based on its 5th generation Core "Broadwell" technology, at that. Bearing a model number of "NUC5i7RYH," this NUC will be driven by a Core i7-5557U dual-core processor (2 cores, 4 threads, 3.40 GHz clocks, 4 MB L3 cache, dual-channel DDR3L-1866 IMC), with Intel Iris-6100 graphics. That could make it the first Steambox-ready NUC to lack NVIDIA or AMD graphics. Intel could use a fan-heatsink to cool the 28W TDP chip.

Source: FanlessTech

5th Generation Intel Core Family of Processors Arrive

Today, Intel unveiled the 5th Generation Intel Core processor family. Built on Intel's cutting edge 14nm manufacturing process, the 5th Gen Intel Core processors deliver premium performance, stunning visuals and enables improved battery life to take computing to the next level. The performance also provides the foundation for more natural and interactive experiences with Intel RealSense technology, Intel Wireless Display (Intel WiDi) and voice assistants.

With the "Broadwell" microarchitecture expected to be the fastest mobile transition in company history, offering consumers a broad selection and availability of devices, the 5th Gen Intel Core processors are purpose-built for the next generation of compute devices offering a thin, light and more efficient experience across traditional notebooks, 2 in 1s, Ultrabook devices, Chromebooks, All-In-One desktop PCs and mini PCs.

Apple's Next 12-inch MacBook Air to Feature USB 3.1 and Core M

Apple's next entry to its pathbreaking ultra-portable notebook, the MacBook Air, will be a new 12-inch screen size version. As with every new MacBook Air release for the past two years, there's talk of a screen resolution jump to "Retina" standards. Apple is preparing other cutting-edge hardware updates.

To begin with, Apple will tap Intel's latest Core M "Broadwell-U" chip, an SoC that combines a dual-core "Broadwell" CPU with graphics, a dual-channel DDR3L IMC, and system agent onto a single chip, with an overall TDP of 15W. Apple is working on a new fanless cooling system for this chip. The other big feature-set upgrade is the USB 3.1 port, which Intel plans to launch with the system agent for its next processor platform. USB 3.1 doubles bandwidth to 10 Gbps, and steps up power-delivery, letting you charge your portable devices faster.


Source: Expreview

Intel "Broadwell" NUC Spotted on Company Website

Intel's next-generation NUC (next unit of computing) compact desktop, believed to be based on the company's Core "Broadwell" processor, was spotted on the company website. Pictures reveal that the next NUC could be pocketable, yet have the computing power of a full-blown desktop. The NUC system board features some of the newer connectivity, such as DDR3L SO-DIMM slots, M.2 slots, an mPCIe slot, an additional SATA 6 Gb/s port, and processors from the Core i3 and Core i5-5000 series. Intel could unveil the next-gen NUC in January 2015, likely at CES 2015.


Source: FanlessTech

Intel Core i7 "Broadwell-E" HEDT Chips Arrive in 2016

Intel is beginning to put out the first details of its next high-end desktop (HEDT) processors, internally. Codenamed "Broadwell-E," the company's next Core i7 HEDT chips will be built in the existing LGA2011v3 package, and will be compatible with existing motherboards based on Intel's X99 Express chipset (with BIOS updates). Much like "Ivy Bridge-E" was to "Sandy Bridge-E," these chips will introduce only incremental updates, and nothing major, in terms of architecture.

To begin with, Core i7 "Broadwell-E" will be built in the 14 nanometer silicon fab process, and will feature 6 to 8 cores based on the "Broadwell" micro-architecture. These cores will be cushioned with up to 20 MB of L3 cache. The chip is pin-compatible to "Haswell-E," and so its I/O will be identical, featuring a quad-channel DDR4 integrated memory controller. One difference is that Intel may can the 28-lane PCIe approach with the entry-level part; or at least it doesn't find mention on the slide. If it's true, all parts based on this silicon, will feature 40-lane PCIe interfaces. The TDP of these chips will be rated at 140W. Intel is expected to launch the Core i7 "Broadwell-E" in 2016.

Source: VR-Zone

First Intel Core M "Broadwell" Benchmarks Surface

Here are some of the first benchmarks of Intel's ambitious Core M processor, a performance-segment dual-core processor with a thermal envelope of just 4.5W, making it ideal for tablets, ultra-portables, and mainstream desktops. At IDF 2014, Intel showed off a 12.5-inch tablet running a Core M 5Y70 chip. An MCM of the CPU and PCH dies, the CPU die features two "Broadwell" 64-bit x86 cores, a large new graphics processor with 24 execution units and 192 stream engines, 4 MB of shared L3 cache, a dual-channel LPDDR3 memory controller, and a PCI-Express 3.0 root complex. The PCH die wires out the platform's various connectivity options.

The 12.5-inch Core M tablet was put through three tests, Cinebench R11.5, SunSpider 1.0.2, and 3DMark Ice Storm Unlimited. With the multi-threaded CPU-intensive Cinebench R11.5, the Core M scores a respectable 17 FPS in the GL bench, with 2.48 pts CPU. That's about 60 percent the performance of a Core i7-870. Significantly higher than anything Atom, Pentium, or AMD E-Series. With SunSpider, the Core M put out a score of 142.8, under Internet Explorer 12 running under Windows 8.1. With 3DMark IceStorm Unlimited, the Core M sprung up a surprise - 50,985 points. That over double that of a Qualcomm Snapdragon 800, and faster than the IGPs AMD E-Series APUs ship with. Color us interested.

Source: HotHardware

ASUS Reveals the Zenbook UX305 Broadwell-Powered 13.3-Inch Laptop

Today at IFA 2014 ASUS showcased its newest Zenbook series ultrabook, a 13.3-inch model dubbed Zenbook UX305 which comes equipped with a 14 nm Intel Core M (Broadwell) processor. The all-aluminum UX305 is 12.3 mm thick, it weighs just 1.2 kg and has a QHD+ (3200 x 1800) display, a 128 GB or 256 GB solid state drive, Bang & Olufsen speakers, 802.11ac WiFi, three USB 3.0 ports, and an HDMI output.

The Zenbook UX305 will ship later this year in two color versions - Obsidian Stone and Ceramic Alloy. No word on pricing.

Intel Haswell TSX Erratum as Grave as AMD Barcelona TLB Erratum

Intel's "Haswell" micro-architecture introduced the transactional synchronization extensions (TSX) as part of its upgraded feature-set over its predecessor. The instructions are designed to speed up certain types of multithreaded software, and although it's too new for any major software vendor to implement, some of the more eager independent software developers began experimenting with them, only to discover that TSX is buggy and can cause critical software failures.

The buggy TSX implementation on Core "Haswell" processors was discovered by a developer outside Intel, who reported it to the company, which then labeled it as an erratum (a known design flaw). Intel is addressing the situation by releasing a micro-code update to motherboard manufacturers, who will then release it as a BIOS update to customers. The update disables TSX on affected products (Core and Xeon "Haswell" retail, and "Broadwell-Y" engineering samples).

Intel Details Newest Microarchitecture and 14 Nanometer Manufacturing Process

Intel today disclosed details of its newest microarchitecture that is optimized with Intel's industry-leading 14 nm manufacturing process. Together these technologies will provide high-performance and low-power capabilities to serve a broad array of computing needs and products from the infrastructure of cloud computing and the Internet of Things to personal and mobile computing.

"Intel's integrated model - the combination of our design expertise with the best manufacturing process - makes it possible to deliver better performance and lower power to our customers and to consumers," said Rani Borkar, Intel vice president and general manager of product development. "This new microarchitecture is more than a remarkable technical achievement. It is a demonstration of the importance of our outside-in design philosophy that matches our design to customer requirements."

Intel President: Integrated, Smart Connected Devices Fuel Next Era of Computing

As computing continues to evolve and expand beyond the traditional PC, Intel Corporation President Renée James said Intel and the Taiwan technology ecosystem have the exciting opportunity to build on the long history of collaborative innovation to deliver seamless and truly personal computing experiences.

Processor technology continues to get smaller with greater performance and lower power thanks to Moore's Law, expanding the scale and potential for Intel technology and that of the Taiwan ecosystem, from infrastructure for cloud computing and the Internet of Things to personal and mobile computing and wearable technology.

Intel X99 Chipset Motherboards Unlikely at Computex

Intel's next-generation HEDT (high end desktop) platform, consisting of Core i7 "Haswell-E" processors and X99 Express chipset motherboards, are unlikely to get a showing at Computex 2014, according to an OCWorkbench report, which has its feet on the ground in Taipei. What makes this development surprising, is that Intel is expected to launch the platform in the second half of 2014, and after Computex, the company won't get another major tradeshow until 2015 International CES, slated for January. What's even more surprising, is that Intel has already launched 9-series motherboards for socket LGA1150, that are designed to support its 14 nm Core "Broadwell" mainline processors. According to the report, Intel will have its motherboard partners focus on already launched Z97 Express and H97 Express motherboards, with a focus on the platform's support for M.2 and SATA-Express interfaces, that enable a new generation of faster SSDs.

Source: OCWorkbench

ADATA's Next-generation XPG Memory Modules Detailed

Here is the first picture of ADATA's XPG V3 DDR3 DRAM module. It will be launched alongside the company's first enthusiast-grade DDR4 modules. ADATA's XPG Z1 DDR4 modules will come in densities as high as 16 GB, clocked at JEDEC-standard DDR4-2133 MHz, and run at module voltages of 1.2V. The same heatspreader design as the one pictured below, will also be used on the company's new XPG V3 line of DDR3 modules, and will come in a number of color options, to match your motherboard's color scheme. The first client platforms with support for DDR4 memory include Intel "Broadwell," and "Haswell-E" HEDT.

Intel's 14 nm "Broadwell" Could Launch by Late-2014

Intel's first processors based on the company's "Broadwell" silicon, which is an incremental upgrade to "Haswell," and built on Intel's swanky new 14 nanometer silicon fabrication process, could launch by late-2014. Intel responded to the 2014 "Back to School" shopping season with 9-series chipset motherboards featuring LGA1150 sockets, and Core "Haswell" Refresh processors. Mobile CPUs based on the silicon, were launched, too. Intel couldn't deliver on "Broadwell," the processor its 9-series chipset was originally designed to accompany. Back in 2013, "Broadwell" was expected to be Intel's big mid-2014 launch, in tune with its "Tick-Tock" product development strategy, that sees introductions of new micro-architectures, and new silicon fabrication processes take turns each year.

Source: Reuters

Intel Updates Desktop CPU Roadmap, Haswell-E, Broadwell, Devil's Canyon Blip

At GDC, Intel announced a backpedal from its plans to eventually reshape desktop CPUs into components that come hardwired to the motherboards across the line, by announcing three new CPU families. It includes the Haswell-E HEDT platform, Broadwell performance platform, and Devil's Canyon. The three are expected to launch in reverse order, beginning with Devil's Canyon. A variant of existing "Haswell" silicon in the LGA1150 package, Devil's Canyon is codename for a breed of hand-picked chips with "insane" overclocking potential. In addition to binned dies, the chips feature a performance-optimized TIM between the die and the integrated heatspreader (IHS). The dies will be placed on special "high tolerance" packages, with equally "special" LGA contact points. The chips will be designed with higher voltage tolerance levels. Devil's Canyon is expected to branded under the existing Core i7-4xxx series, possibly with "Extreme" brand extension. It will be compatible with motherboards based on the Z97 chipset.

Next up, is "Broadwell." A successor to Haswell, Broadwell is its optical shrink to Intel's new 14-nanometer silicon fab process, with minor improvements to IPC, new power-management features, and likely added instruction sets, much like what "Ivy Bridge" was to "Sandy Bridge." It will take advantage of the new process to step up CPU and iGPU clock speeds. Broadwell is expected to launch in the second half of 2014. Lastly, there's Haswell-E. Built in the company's next-gen LGA2011 socket (incompatible with the current LGA2011), this HEDT (high-end desktop) processor will feature up to eight CPU cores, up to 15 MB of L3 cache, a 48-lane PCI-Express 3.0 root complex, and a quad-channel DDR4 integrated memory controller (IMC). Intel is also planning to launch a socketed variant of the Core i7-4770R, which is based on the company's Haswell GT3e silicon, which features the Iris Pro 5200 graphics core, with 40 execution units, and 128 MB of L4 cache.

FinalWire AIDA64 v4.20 Released

FinalWire announced the latest version of its smash-hit system diagnostics and benchmarking suite, AIDA64 v4.20. The new version comes with a long list of feature updates, including a new diagnostics page for AMD Mantle API under the "Display" section, a new multi-threaded memory stress test that takes advantage of AVX2, AVX, FMA, BMI2, BMI, and SSE2 instruction sets. Version 4.20 also adds support for Intel Core "Haswell Refresh" processors, "Wildcat Point" PCH, upcoming "Broadwell" CPUs, "Royston" SoCs; Radeon R5, R7, and R9 series GPUs; and OCZ Vertex 460 SSDs.
DOWNLOAD: FinalWire AIDA64 v4.20 (installer) | FinalWire AIDA64 v4.20 (ZIP package)

Core i7 "Haswell-E" Engineering Sample Pictured

Here's the first picture of Intel's next-generation Core i7 HEDT (high-end desktop) processor, codenamed "Haswell-E." Based on Intel's latest "Haswell" micro-architecture, the chip will be Intel's first HEDT processor to ship with eight cores, and the first client CPU to ship with next-generation DDR4 memory interface. In addition to IPC improvements over "Ivy Bridge" that come with "Haswell," the chip integrates a quad-channel DDR4 integrated memory controller, with native memory speeds of DDR4-2133 MHz; a PCI-Express gen 3.0 root complex with a total of 40 PCI-Express lanes, and yet the same DMI 2.0 (4 GB/s) chipset bus.

Built into the LGA2011-3 socket, "Haswell-E" will be incompatible with current LGA2011 motherboards, as the notches of the package will vary from LGA2011 "Ivy Bridge-E." Intel will introduce the new X99 Express chipset, featuring all 6 Gb/s SATA ports, integrated USB 3.0 controllers, and a PCI-Express gen 2.0 root complex for third-party onboard controllers. Interestingly, there's no mention of SATA-Express, which Intel's next-generation 9-series chipset for Core "Broadwell" platforms reportedly ships with; and X99 isn't looking too different from today's Z87 chipset. With engineering samples already out, it wouldn't surprise us if Intel launches "Haswell-E" along the sidelines of any of next year's big-three trade-shows (CES, CeBIT, and Computex).

Source: VR-Zone

Intel's 2014 Thunderbolt Controller Detailed

Intel is continuing on its mission to establish Thunderbolt as the next universal device interconnect standard, despite steep competition from the 5 Gb/s USB 3.0, the upcoming 10 Gb/s USB 3.1, and stringent validation and licensing barriers on its own end. To that effect, the company outlined its mainstream Thunderbolt controller, which it plans to launch some time in 2014. The company is planning two major introductions to the standard, to help it compete against USB - power delivery, and ad-hoc (peer-to-peer) networking.

The controller, Broadwell Thunderbolt-LP, isn't designed too differently from what's available in the market. It handles a 20 Gb/s Thunderbolt link by aggregating two 10 Gb/s channels, relays DisplayPort 1.2 from the system's graphics device, and connects to the rest of the system over PCIe 2.0 x2. The chip is built in the 8 x 8 mm package, and features operational and idle TDP ratings of 1.5W and 1mW, respectively. The changes Intel is making to the standard will enable power delivery of up to 53W over a standard tethered cable. That's enough power to run a drive dock with up to six 3.5-inch hard drives, or a small (<24-inch) flat-screen monitor. The other big feature is ad-hoc networking, which enables people to set up peer-to-peer 20 Gb/s connections between two PCs much in the same way they did with USB and RS232, back in the day. While it's no Ethernet replacement, it could prove useful in certain environments, such as content-creation. Intel is expected to make some Thunderbolt-related announcements at CES, next January.

Source: VR-Zone
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