News Posts matching "CPU"

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Antec Gives Away Free LGA2011 Bracket for Kuhler H2O 920 and 620

Antec announced today that it is giving away free socket LGA2011 brackets for existing owners of its Kuhler H2O 920 and Kuhler H2O 620 closed-loop CPU water coolers. The two were released before Intel launched its new socket, and so there are large stocks in the market that lack LGA2011 brackets. To avail this offer, existing owners have to write to Kuhler.eu@antec.com with a proof of purchase of their product, and shipping address. Antec also announced that it has started bundling the LGA2011 bracket with all fresh batches of Kuhler H2O 920 and Kuhler H2O 620, which will start shipping from its factories in February.

28 nm struggles: TSMC & GlobalFoundries

Making silicon chips is not easy, requiring hugely expensive fabs, with massive clean-room environments and at every process shrink, the complexity and difficulty of making the things goes up significantly. It looks like TSMC and GlobalFoundries are both having serious yield problems with their 28 nm process nodes, according to Mike Bryant, technology analyst at Future Horizons and this is causing a rash of non-working wafers – to the point of having nothing working with some chip designs submitted for production. It seems that the root cause of these problems are to do with the pressures of bringing products to market, rather than an inherent problem with the technology; it just takes time that they haven't got to iron out the kinks and they're getting stuck: "Foundries have come under pressure to release cell libraries too early – which end up with designs that don't work," Bryant said. In an effort to try and be seen to treat every customer equally, TSMC is attempting to launch ten 28 nm designs from seven companies, but it's not working out too well: "At 45-nm, only NVIDIA was affected. At 28-nm any problems for TSMC will be problems for many customers" said Bryant.

Anno 2070's Draconian DRM: Ubisoft Loosens Restrictions. Slightly

Last week we brought you news of Ubisoft's hard three machine activation limit on Anno 2070 and how it scuppered a review by Guru3D when they swapped out graphics cards. Guru3D's post then went viral on the web and it appears that this has put sufficient pressure or 'heat' on Ubisoft to relax the restrictions just a tiny bit, since they weren't going to use any more Ubisoft games for benchmarks. So what have they done? Allowed an unlimited number of graphics card swaps. That's it, everything else stays the same, so if other components such as the CPU, motherboard etc are changed, then one will still run into this frustrating brick wall and have to get in touch with customer support to reset the activations.

TechPowerUp Announces ThrottleStop 4.0

TechPowerUp also published the latest version of ThrottleStop, a nifty utility that lets you monitor the CPU clock speed throttling scheme used by your notebook, and provides you with options to override or change it. This is particularly useful for noteboook users facing performance issues even when the notebook is plugged in, despite enabling Windows "high-performance" power scheme. The application's main window lets you perform both monitoring and tweaking, its left pane provides you with tweaking your CPU's power scheme using three methods, while its right pane lets you monitor the way in which your OS is throttling the CPU, down to the level of logical CPUs (threads).

DOWNLOAD: ThrottleStop 4.0

Anno 2070's Draconian DRM: Guru3D's Graphics Card Review Killed Off

Anno 2070's Draconian DRM: Guru3D's Graphics Card Review Killed Off (UPDATED)

Hilbert Hagedoorn of well-known PC tech review site guru3d.com recently bought a copy of Ubisoft's Anno 2070 and wanted to use it in one of his graphics card reviews. However, he became badly unstuck. This game comes on the Steam platform and the store page states: "3rd-party DRM: Solidshield Tages SAS 3 machine activation limit". Unfortunately for Guru3D, they found out exactly what this means, which resulted in just one performance graph, an aborted review, an unplayable game – and bad publicity for Ubisoft once again. They have published an article about their experience, pledging not to use their titles again because of this DRM.

Thermaltake Frio OCK Given Snow Edition Treatment, Too

Like with the Frio Snow Edition, Thermaltake's higher-end CPU air cooler, the Frio OCK, also has a Snow Edition variant. As a variant, its specifications are otherwise identical to the original, except that the black+red colored plastic parts (such as shrouds, fan frames, and impellers), are replaced with white+blue colored ones. The blue, of course, is an "icy" shade of it. The top shroud is black, to offer a nice contrast with the white+blue colored fan frame. Measuring 143 x 136.8 x 158.4 mm (LxWxH), the cooler weighs about 1.1 kg. It uses a slightly larger heatsink than the one found on the Frio, to which heat is conveyed by six 6 mm-thick heat pipes. The heatsink is ventilated by two 130 mm fans in "push-pull" configuration. The new variant also provides out-of-the-box support for LGA2011 socket.

Thermaltake Frio Snow Edition CPU Cooler Pictured

Responding to the market's new-found love for white colored components, Thermaltake announced a few "Snow Edition" products, including the Frio Snow Edition, pictured below. This cooler uses the same exact design as the original version, but replaces the black+red plastic parts of it with white+blue, including a white colored fan impeller. It is a typical aluminum fin tower-type heatsink with two pre-fitted 120 mm fans in push-pull configuration. It measures 139 x 98 x 165 mm (LxWxH), weighing a little over 1 kg. Another feature of this cooler is out-of-the-box support for socket LGA2011.

Arctic Shows Off Freezer i30 and A30 CPU Coolers

Arctic showed of two nearly-identical CPU coolers, the Freezer i30 and Freezer A30. The two are identical till the point where the i30 is designed for Intel sockets only (LGA2011, LGA1155/1156), while the A30, for AMD sockets only (AM3+/AM3/AM2+/AM2). The two share a tower-type aluminum fin-stack heatsink design, capable of handling thermal loads of up to 320W.

The heatsink uses four 8 mm thick exposed-copper heat pipes that make direct contact with the CPU at the base, and pass through the heatsink, which is then ventilated by a 120 mm PWM-controlled fan with a fancy-looking frame. Rubber standoffs attach the fan to the heatsink dampening vibrations. The retention clips come attached to the heatsink out of the box. A 0.5g syringe of Arctic MX-4 compound is included, while the coolers' base don't come with the compound pre-applied.

AMD Flogging Dodgy Chips? Gets Slapped With Lawsuit

AMD has been slapped with a lawsuit by Quanta for allegedly selling faulty CPUs & GPUs that were unfit for purpose, since they didn't meet specified heat tolerances and subsequently failed. Taiwan-based Quanta may not have a name that the general public immediately recognizes, however they are actually the world's largest contract manufacturer of notebooks, so this lawsuit is a big deal. They claim that the faulty parts were used in notebooks made for NEC. The lawsuit was filed in a district court in San Jose, California and in the filing, Quanta claims they have "suffered significant injury to prospective revenue and profits". As Bloomberg reports, "the lawsuit also claims breach of warranty, negligent misrepresentation, civil fraud and interference with a contract."
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