News Posts matching "Firefox"

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Mozilla Firefox 3 RC3 Released

Mozilla announced Firefox 3 Release Candidate 3 on Wednesday, June 11, 2008. The third Firefox 3 Release Candidate contains a single change for Mac OS X users only; there is no change for users running previous Firefox Release Candidate versions on Windows or Linux. You can find out more about the new Features of Firefox 3 in the “What’s New” section of the release notes. For any one who wishes to download the web browser in any of the 45 different languages on hand, please click here.Source: The Mozilla Blog

Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.14 Available

Mozilla has updated its Firefox 2 web browser to version 2.0.0.14. The new version fixes one critical bug that may lead to a stability problem, where some users experience crashes during JavaScript garbage collection (MFSA 2008-20). To download Firefox 2.0.0.14 select "Check for Updates…" from the Help menu or manually apply the update by downloading it from here for Windows, Mac, and Linux.Source: Mozilla Blog

Mozilla Firefox 3 Beta 5 Released

Mozilla announced Firefox 3 Beta 5 today, intended for developer testing and community feedback. Beta 5 includes new features as well as dramatic improvements to performance, memory usage and speed.
  • Improvements to the user interface based on user feedback, including changes to the look and feel on Windows Vista, Windows XP, Mac OS X and Linux.
  • Changes and fixes for new features such as the location bar autocomplete, bookmark backup and restore, full page zoom, and others, based on feedback from our community.
  • Fixes and improvements to platform features to improve security, web compatabilty and stability.
  • Continued performance improvements: changes to our JavaScript engine as well as profile guided optimization continues to improve performance over previous releases as measured by the popular SunSpider test from Apple, and in the speed of web applications like Google Mail and Zoho Office.
Download Firefox 3 Beta 5 for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux in 45 different languages. Also check the Release Notes.Source: The Mozilla Blog

Mozilla Firefox 4 Features Surface

Although Firefox 3 is still in research and development, Mozilla is already working on new features for the fourth version of its increasingly popular Web browser. Webware spoke with Mozilla vice president Chris Beard, who mentioned two specific new concepts for Firefox 4 that will evolve the online experience and add greater integration with content stored on computer hard drives. One of the new features is called "Prism," a next-gen software technology that would allow users to run Web-based content offline. For example, users would be able to visit websites and still access non-dynamic content even when they don't have an active Internet connection. The other big feature already unveiled for Firefox 4 is called "Weave." This is an option that would basically create a set of online preferences and settings that is stored for each user instead of each computer. In other words, users would be able to bring up their bookmarks, font settings and privacy preferences no matter which computer they use. This feature is set to be in its first stages in Firefox 3, but Firefox 4 will reportedly allow users to access these profiles on other browsers as well. Beard told Webware that these are just a hint of some of the "crazy ideas" the development team is working on for the next-next-gen browser.Source: TG Daily, Webware

Firefox 2.0.0.13 Released

Mozilla has released a new minor update for its popular Firefox browser, bringing the version number to 2.0.0.13. Six security issues have been fixed in this release, and if Firefox hasn’t already prompted you to update it’s recommended you click on “Check for Updates...” from the application’s Help menu. Alternatively, you can download the update from this website.Source: Mozilla

Internet Explorer 5.5 Beats IE 6 and 7 in Web Standards Test

Some readers may already be familiar with the Web Standards Project, which claims it “fights for standards that reduce the cost and complexity of development while increasing the accessibility and long-term viability of any site published on the Web.” The Acid Tests provided by the project are commonly used as a benchmark to see how compatible different browsers are, and Internet Explorer has found itself on the end of much criticism when it comes to this, being beaten by nearly all competing browsers such as Opera, Firefox, Safari and Konqueror. However, in the recently launched Acid Test 3, the ancient Internet Explorer 5.5 manages to outscore both IE 6 and 7, reaching a still rather miserable 14% compared to 12% for the other two. Meanwhile, Konqueror leads the pack with 62%, with Firefox in fourth on 52% and Opera a little way down the table at 46%, ahead of Safari on 39%. In terms of beta browsers, Safari is well out in front on 90%, and IE 8 trails at the bottom on 17%.

Source: Anomalous Anomaly

Mozilla Firefox 3 Beta 4 Released

Mozilla has released the 4th public beta version of Firefox 3. Here are a few of the updates packed into Firefox 3 beta 4:
  • Full page zoom - Up until now, Firefox would let you make text larger or smaller, but there was no way to increase or decrease the size of all the content on a web site (something you've been able to do with Opera for years). Now you can choose whether the zoom feature works for text or full pages.
  • New download manager - The new download manager shows active time remaining, and the status of downloads. You can also search your downloads and see the site where your downloaded files are from.
  • Improved OS integration - Firefox 3 beta 4 includes specific icons and themes for Windows Vista, OS X, and Linux (using the native GTK theme).
  • Improved memory usage
Firefox 3 beta 4 also includes a ton of other tweaks and bug fixes described in the release notes.
DOWNLOADSource: Download Squad, Mozilla

Netscape Navigator to Officially Die Next Week

While most of us hardly even thought that Netscape was still seeing regular updates and security patches, AOL was making sure that exactly that was happening. Apparently, that's all going to stop next week, as AOL is hunting for ways to cut costs around the house. Neowin published a nice eulogy for the classic web browser all too many of us with dial-up grew to know all too well...
Netscape was founded in 1994, and quickly won customers by providing software that made it easy for people to navigate the Internet. Netscape went public a year later and saw its stock price nearly triple on its first day of trading. At one point, the company had an $8 billion market cap and 90% of the Web browser market. But soon it all went south. Microsoft introduced its Internet Explorer browser and began eating into Netscape’s market share. Microsoft later paid AOL, which bought Netscape in 2000, $750 million to settle antitrust charges.
Netscape accounts for less than 1% of internet users now. Anyone known using Netscape has been sent an E-mail from the Netscape development team, urging an immediate switch to Firefox or Flock browsers.Source: Neowin.net

Mozilla Firefox 3 Beta 3 Milestone Reached

Mozilla's Firefox internet browser has gained another stage, reaching Beta 3 phase. This is the eleventh developer milestone focused on testing the core functionality provided by many new features and changes to the platform scheduled for Firefox 3. Please note that this donwload is not recommend to anyone other than developers and testers. Although Firefox 3 Beta 3 is now widely available in more than 30 languages, it is intended for testing purposes only. Proceed here to download the desired Firefox 3 Beta 3.Source: Mozilla

Firefox 2.0.0.12 Still Vulnerable to Hacks

Just a few hours after Mozilla promised the public they were safe from hackers while using Firefox 2.0.0.12, a hacker went and found a way around the patch. The hacker, named Ronald van den Heetkamp, has this to say to the Firefox developer team.
Don't patch vulnerabilities for fifty percent, take the time and fix the cause. Because directory traversal through plugins is all nice and such, we don't need it. We can trick Firefox itself in traversing directories back. I found another information leak that is very serious because we are able to read out all preferences set in Firefox, or just open or include about every file stored in the Mozilla program files directory, and this without any mandatory settings or plugins.
Ronald van den Heetkamp recommends installing the NoScript add-on, or simply using an alternative browser, until Mozilla fixes this bug.Source: Neowin.net

Mozilla Admits Security Breach, Promises Fix by February 5th

It would appear that running any of 600 add-ons in Mozilla Firefox opens up a terrible hole. When exploited, this hole allows a hacker to steal "session information, including session cookies and session history". Mozilla promises a fix by February 5th, with the release of Firefox version 2.0.0.12. While Mozilla classifies this threat as a "high risk", there is some controversy in the hacker world as to how bad this threat really is. According to a hacker, via "hiredhacker.com", this isn't as big a problem as people have made it out to be. However, it is certainly more serious than "leaking a few variables", and should definitely be patched as soon as possible.Source: Neowin.net

Mozilla Announces Weave Sync Service

Mozilla, developer of the popular Firefox web browser, have launched a new related service, Weave. Currently available only as a test version associated with the latest Firefox 3 beta, it should allow users to carry history and bookmarks from one computer to another, as well as share the information with select friends and family; users need only to create a Weave account and download the add-on. To prevent the natural threat of privacy invasion, Weave accounts are password-protected, and encrypted. Weave will run on Windows and Linux systems as well as Macs.Source: Electronista, Mozilla labs

Mozilla Beats Schedule, Launches Firefox 3 Beta 2 Early

Mozilla Corp. released the second beta of Firefox 3 late yesterday, several days earlier than it had planned. Last week, Mike Beltzner, Mozilla's interface designer, pegged Firefox 3 Beta 2's tentative release at midafternoon on Friday, Dec. 21. Last night, however, after announcing that the beta was finished and ready to download, Damon Sicore, Mozilla's director of platform engineering, said, "We shipped three days ahead of schedule, only 31 days after Beta 1!" In a post to the mozilla.dev.planning forum today, Beltzner touted several improvements in Beta 2 over November's predecessor, including better protection against cross-site JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) data leaks, and a new "effective top-level domain" (eTLD) service that puts tighter control on site-specific content such as cookies to stymie privacy hacks and session hijacking.

High School Student Gets Detention for Using Firefox

Apparently, the Firefox crowd needs to raise awareness of what exactly Firefox does. A high school student was doing his assignments using the internet browser, and got this note home from the teacher...
To the Parent(s)/Guardian(s) of [Redacted], Grade 11

This is to inform you [Redacted] has been assigned a(n) Detention.

Today in class [redacted] had a program launched called Foxfire.exe [sic]. I had told [redacted] to close the program and to resume work but he told me that it was just a different browser and that he was doing his work. I had given him two warnings but he insisted that it was just a 'better' browser and that he wasn't doing anything wrong. I had then issued his detention
The teacher who issued this letter is proof that Firefox simply needs to step up their advertising campaign. The teacher that issued this detention had no idea how to even spell the program name, let alone what it did. Granted, the teacher probably gave this detention out of safety protocol. After all, if you saw a foreign program running on a lot of expensive computers you didn't own, wouldn't you want it out of your systems?Source: The Inquirer

Microsoft Says Internet Explorer More Secure Than Firefox

Jeff Jones, Security Strategy Director at Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Group, following his recent report putting Windows Vista ahead of Linux and Mac OS X for security, has now placed Internet Explorer ahead of the open source Firefox browser in a long-term comparative study. According to his analysis, fewer security vulnerabilities needed fixing in Internet Explorer than in the competition. Jones explains in his report Browser Vulnerability Analysis (PDF), that Mozilla has fixed 199 security vulnerabilities since November 2004, when Firefox first appeared, of which 75 were critical, 100 medium and 24 of low importance. Over the same period, a total of 87 security vulnerabilities were fixed in Internet Explorer, of which 54 were critical, 28 medium and 5 of low importance. He also notes that security updates are currently only being released for version 2.0 of Firefox, while Microsoft provides full support for earlier versions of Internet Explorer.Source: heise Security

Mozilla Rushes Out Firefox 2.0.0.11 Update

After releasing the 2.0.0.10 update for its Firefox browser on Tuesday this week, Mozilla has quickly issued another update to take Firefox to version 2.0.0.11. The latest update fixes a stability problem that was found in the 2.0.0.10 release, and it is recommended that all Firefox users update to this patch to prevent any potential problems. The release notes are available here, and the patch can be downloaded either using the Help menu in Firefox or by visiting Mozilla’s download page.

Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.10 Released

Firefox 2.0.0.10 is now available for download. This version patches three security holes in the world's second most-popular browser. The first bug is a cross-site scripting flaw in the jar: URI scheme, which may allow an attacker to steal private information (a proof of concept has been published demonstrating how the contacts of logged-in Gmail users can be stolen). Firefox 2.0.0.10 also fixes three stability bugs, which could be exploited to corrupt memory and potentially execute arbitrary code. The final issue relates to a race condition when setting the window.location property, which could be used to spoof a HTTP Referer header. The release can be downloaded from the Mozilla Firefox product page. More information about the new version can be found in the Firefox 2.0.0.10 release notes.Source: Mozilla

Firefox 3.0 Beta 1 Memory Usage Tested

Ever since Firefox 3.0 Beta 1 was released to the public, people have been wondering whether or not memory usage was any better. An independent tester decided to take it upon himself to investigate. Running a Windows Vista Home Premium system with 2GB of RAM that had never had Firefox installed on it before, the man put each browser under three different testing scenarios (that were equivalent between the two systems). First, he loaded five web pages into the browser. Then, he loaded a single page and let the browser idle for 10 minutes. Finally, he loaded 12 pages and waited five minutes. The results are very interesting.

Firefox 2.0.0.9 used 35,640KB of RAM on the first test, 47,852KB on the second test, and a staggering 103,180KB on the last test. Firefox 3.0 Beta 1 at first did not seem to be doing much better, using 38,644KB and 63,764KB of RAM on the first and second tests, respectively. However, on the final test, Firefox 3.0 Beta 1 required only 62,312KB, over 40,000KB less than what Firefox 2.0.0.9 required. For comparison, Internet Explorer 7 used 89,756KB on the final test. Please check out the source link for screenshots and more detailed test results.Source: ZDNet

Firefox Plans Bug Fix Release in a Week

Mozilla plans to release a bug fix for its Firefox browser next week, repairing a long-standing security flaw in the software. The 2.0.0.10 update is in testing right now and should be released to the public next week, following the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S. "We are giving it a couple of days to make sure that there are no issues found and we'll release it after Thanksgiving," said Mike Schroepfer, Mozilla's vice president of engineering. The issue that is to be fixed was first reported last February by Jesse Ruderman, but it gained widespread attention earlier this month when researcher Petko Petkov pointed out on his blog that the flaw could be used to launch a cross-site scripting attack against the Firefox browser. The flaw has to do with the fact that Firefox does not properly check files that are compressed using the .jar (Java Archive) format. Attackers could sneak malicious code into the Jar-compressed documents, which would then be run by the victim. Mozilla also published today the first beta of Firefox 3.Source: InfoWorld

Mozilla Won’t Fix 80% of Firefox 3.0’s Bugs

Mozilla Corp. will fix just 20% of the bugs now in Firefox 3.0 before the final version is released next year, the open-source developer's Web site revealed Wednesday. As Mozilla pushes to post Beta 1 of Firefox 3.0 in time, it has asked developers to prioritize already-identified bugs so that the most important can be fixed. That means 80% of the approximately 700 bugs currently marked as "blockers" will not be fixed for Firefox 3. Firefox 3.0 is months behind the schedule Mozilla set about midyear, when it said the browser would reach Beta 1 in late July and move into a second beta in September, both preceding a final release by the end of the year.Source: New York Times

Mozilla Still Perplexed as to Why Firefox Takes So Much RAM

Anyone who uses Mozilla Firefox in a Windows environment knows that Firefox can use a lot of memory. Now that Mozilla is getting a lot of requests to make a mobile version, they are working very hard to make a version that won't eat all of the mobile phone's memory. Christopher Blizzard, a member of Mozilla's development board, had this to say about Firefox's alleged memory issues.
As Mozilla starts down the path to running in the mobile space we are spending time looking at memory pressure issues more closely. . . (I)t sounds like the early data suggests that Mozilla really doesn't leak that much memory at all. But it does thrash the allocator pretty hard and that's what causes the perception of memory leaks.
Source: CRN
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