News Posts matching "GM200"

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NVIDIA to Launch GeForce GTX 980 Ti After Summer

NVIDIA reportedly adjusted launch of the GeForce GTX 980 Ti, to after Summer, 2015. The company could be using the time to let the market digest existing inventories of the GTX 980 (and avoid the repeat of slow sales on its GTX 770), particularly in the early-Summer season, when PC enthusiasts and gamers tend to upgrade or build afresh. The time could also be spent to watch what AMD comes up with, for its Radeon R9 390X.

The R9 390X, scheduled for a June-July launch, is based on a silicon that looks competitive with the GM200 on paper, and introduces a few new features, such as high-bandwidth memory (HBM). The GTX 980 Ti could feature an identical core-configuration to the GTX TITAN X, but feature half the memory amount at 6 GB, different clock speeds, and freedom for add-in card (AIC) partners to innovate custom-design cards.

Source: SweClockers

MSI Announces its GeForce GTX TITAN X Graphics Card

As one of the world's leading brands in graphics cards, MSI is pleased to announce the availability of the impressive MSI GeForce GTX TITAN X. The full potential and power of the NVIDIA Maxwell GPU is now available to enthusiasts everywhere. Housing the world's most powerful GPU, the NVIDIA Maxwell GM200, the TITAN X features 3072 CUDA Cores and 12GB GDDR5 memory on a 384 bit bus. Making this card the ultimate choice for gamers looking for a smooth 4K gaming experience.

The true capabilities of the MSI GeForce TITAN X can be unleashed by using the MSI Afterburner overclocking utility. Allowing the adjusting of the core and memory clock speeds to explore the limits of this incredible beast. The MSI GeForce GTX TITAN X is the best choice for high-end gamers.

GIGABYTE Announces its GeForce GTX TITAN X

GIGABYTE rolled out its GeForce GTX TITAN graphics card (model: GV-NTITANXD5-12GD-B). The card is little more than GIGABYTE-specific bar-codes and GIGABYTE packaging, stuck onto a reference board. It offers reference clock speeds of 1002 MHz core, 1089 MHz GPU Boost, and 7012 MHz (GDDR5-effective) memory. Based on the 28 nm GM200 silicon, the GTX TITAN X offers 3,072 CUDA cores based on the "Maxwell" architecture, 192 TMUs, 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory. The card is priced at US $999.

NVIDIA Launches the GeForce GTX TITAN X

NVIDIA formally launched the GeForce GTX TITAN X, its flagship graphics card based on the "Maxwell" architecture, following its GDC 2015 unveiling. Based on the new 28 nm GM200 silicon, the GTX TITAN X packs 3,072 CUDA cores, 192 TMUs, 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory. With 50% more graphics processing muscle over its previous-generation (7.1 TFLOP/s), the card retains its 250W TDP rating, of its predecessor. The GTX TITAN will launch in reference-design, and will be priced at US $999.

More Radeon R9 390X Specs Leak: Close to 70% Faster than R9 290X

Earlier today, AMD reportedly showed its industry partners (likely add-in board partners) a presentation, which was leaked to the web as photographs, and look reasonably legitimate, at first glance. If these numbers of AMD's upcoming flagship product, the Radeon R9 390X WCE (water-cooled edition) hold up, then it could spell trouble for NVIDIA and its GeForce GTX TITAN X. To begin with, the slides confirm that the R9 390X will feature 4,096 stream processors, based on a more refined version of Graphics CoreNext architecture. The core ticks at speeds of up to 1050 MHz. The R9 390X could sell in two variants, an air-cooled one with tamed speeds, and a WCE (water-cooled edition) variant, which comes with an AIO liquid-cooling solution, which lets it throw everything else out of the window in psychotic and murderous pursuit of performance.

It's the memory, where AMD appears to be an early adopter (as its HD 4870 was the first to run the faster GDDR5). The R9 390X features a 4096-bit wide HBM memory bus, holding up to 8 GB of memory. The memory is clocked at 1.25 GHz. The actual memory bandwidth will yet end up much higher than the 5.00 GHz 512-bit GDDR5 on the R9 290X. Power connectors will be the same combination as the previous generation (6-pin + 8-pin). What does this all boil down to? A claimed single-precision floating point performance figure of 8.6 TFLOP/s. Wonder how NVIDIA's GM200 compares to that. AMD claims that the R9 390X will be 50-60% faster than the R9 290X, and we're talking about benchmarks such as Battlefield 4 and FarCry 4. The expectations on NVIDIA's upcoming product are only bound to get higher.


Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN-X Specs Revealed

NVIDIA's GeForce GTX TITAN-X, unveiled last week at GDC 2015, is shaping up to be a beast, on paper. According to an architecture block-diagram of the GM200 silicon leaked to the web, the GTX TITAN-X appears to be maxing out all available components on the 28 nm GM200 silicon, on which it is based. While maintaining the same essential component hierarchy as the GM204, the GM200 (and the GTX TITAN-X) features six graphics processing clusters, holding a total of 3,072 CUDA cores, based on the "Maxwell" architecture.

With "Maxwell" GPUs, TMU count is derived as CUDA core count / 16, giving us a count of 192 TMUs. Other specs include 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory, using 24x 4 Gb memory chips. The core is reportedly clocked at 1002 MHz, with a GPU Boost frequency of 1089 MHz. The memory is clocked at 7012 MHz (GDDR5-effective), yielding a memory bandwidth of 336 GB/s. NVIDIA will use a lossless texture-compression technology to improve bandwidth utilization. The chip's TDP is rated at 250W. The card draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connectors, display outputs include three DisplayPort 1.2, one HDMI 2.0, and one dual-link DVI.

Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN-X Pictured Up-close

Here are some of the first close-up shots of NVIDIA's new flagship graphics card, the GeForce GTX TITAN-X, outside Jen-Hsun Huang's Rafiki moment at a GDC presentation. If we were to throw in an educated guess, NVIDIA probably coined the name "TITAN-X" as it sounds like "Titan Next," much like it chose "TITAN-Z" as it sounds like "Titans" (plural, since it's a dual-GPU card). Laid flat out on a table, the card features an a matte-black colored reference cooling solution that looks identical to the one on the original TITAN. Other cosmetic changes include a green glow inside the fan intake, the TITAN logo, and of course, the green glow on the GeForce GTX marking on the top.

The card lacks a back-plate, giving us a peek at its memory chips. The card features 12 GB of GDDR5 memory, and looking at the twelve memory chips on the back of the PCB, with no other traces, we reckon the chip features a 384-bit wide memory interface. The 12 GB is achieved using twenty-four 4 Gb chips. The card draws power from a combination of 8-pin and 6-pin power connectors. The display I/O is identical to that of the GTX 980, with three DisplayPorts, one HDMI, and one DVI. Built on the 28 nm GM200 silicon, the GTX TITAN-X is rumored to feature 3,072 CUDA cores. NVIDIA CEO claimed that the card will be faster than even the previous generation dual-GPU flagship product by NVIDIA, the GeForce GTX TITAN-Z.


Source: MaximumPC

NVIDIA Unveils the GeForce GTX TITAN-X

NVIDIA surprised everyone at its GDC 2015 event, by unveiling its flagship graphics card based on the "Maxwell" architecture, the GeForce GTX TITAN-X. Although the unveiling was no formal product launch, and it didn't come with a disclosure of specs, but a look at the card itself, and a claim by no less than NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang, that the card will be faster than the current-gen dual-GPU GTX TITAN-Z, there are some highly plausible rumors about its specs doing the rounds.

The GTX TITAN-X is a single-GPU graphics card, expected to be based on the company's GM200 silicon. This chip is rumored to feature 3,072 CUDA cores based on the "Maxwell" architecture, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory. NVIDIA is likely taking advantage of new 8 Gb GDDR5 chips. Even otherwise, achieving 12 GB using 4 Gb chips isn't impossible. The card itself looks nearly identical to the GTX TITAN Black, with its nickel alloy cooler shroud, with two differences - the "TITAN" marking towards the front of the card glows white, while the fan is decked with green lights, in addition to green glowing "GeForce GTX" logo on the top. You get to control the lighting via GeForce Experience. NVIDIA plans to run more demos of the card throughout the week.

Source: PC World

Radeon R9 380X Based on "Grenada," a Refined "Hawaii"

AMD's upcoming Radeon R9 380X and R9 380 graphics cards, with which it wants to immediately address the GTX 980 and GTX 970, will be based on a "new" silicon codenamed "Grenada." Built on the 28 nm silicon fab process, Grenada will be a refined variant of "Hawaii," much in the same way as "Curacao" was of "Pitcairn," in the previous generation.

The Grenada silicon will have the same specs as Hawaii - 2,816 GCN stream processors, 176 TMUs, 64 ROPs, and a 512-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 4 GB memory. Refinements in the silicon over Hawaii could allow AMD to increase clock speeds, to outperform the GTX 980 and GTX 970. We don't expect the chip to be any more energy efficient at its final clocks, than Hawaii. AMD's design focus appears to be performance. AMD could save itself the embarrassment of a loud reference design cooler, by throwing the chip up for quiet custom-design cooling solutions from AIB (add-in board) partners from day-one.

Possible NVIDIA GM200 Specs Surface

Somebody sent our GPU-Z validation database a curious looking entry. Labeled "NVIDIA Quadro M6000" (not to be confused with AMD FirePro M6000), with a device ID of 10DE - 17F0, this card is running on existing Forceware 347.09 drivers, and features a BIOS string that's unlike anything we've seen. Could this be the fabled GM200/GM210 silicon?

The specs certainly look plausible - 3,072 CUDA cores, 50 percent more than those on the GM204; a staggering 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory. The memory is clocked at 6.60 GHz (GDDR5-effective), belting out 317 GB/s of bandwidth. The usable bandwidth is higher than that, due to NVIDIA's new lossless texture compression algorithms. The core is running at gigahertz-scraping 988 MHz. The process node and die-size are values we manually program GPU-Z to show, since they're not things the drivers report (to GPU-Z). NVIDIA is planning to hold a presser on the 8th of January, along the sidelines of the 2015 International CES. We're expecting a big announcement (pun intended).

NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN II Detailed

Riding on the success of its GM204 silicon, it looks like NVIDIA won't wait for the 20 nm silicon fab process to build its next big GPU, which powers its enthusiast-segment graphics cards. The GM200 silicon will be built on the existing 28 nm silicon fab process. Among other SKUs, NVIDIA's next GeForce GTX TITAN product, the GTX TITAN II, could be based on this chip. A curious-looking data entry was submitted from an anonymous source to SiSoft's hardware database, which gives away some rather glaring details of the GM200.

To begin with, the GM200 will be built on the existing 28 nm node, and will feature a die-area of 551 mm². The chip will be based on the "Maxwell" architecture, and feature 3,072 CUDA cores, cushioned by a 3 MB L3 cache. The chip will likely feature a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, with lossless texture compression algorithms, which work to step up memory bandwidth. The standard memory amount is a staggering 12 GB, double that of the first-generation GTX TITAN. Given how AMD recently gave 8 GB variants of its Radeon R9 290X a coordinated launch, GPU vendors could be seeing a utility in giving their products such massive amounts of video memory, to cope with resolutions such as 4K Ultra HD, and perhaps even 5K 16xHD. The chip features reasonably high clock speeds, with the core running at 1100 MHz, and a staggering 1390 MHz GPU Boost. The memory, however, is clocked at 6.00 GHz.

Source: Expreview

NVIDIA Moving Around the Fabled GeForce GTX TITAN II

NVIDIA is moving around engineering samples of what it describes as "GM200 A1 graphics processor," in its shipping manifest. The sample was making its way from Taiwan, to Bangalore, India, from where it's likely pushed to the company's facilities in Bangalore and Hyderabad. A1 steppings of NVIDIA chips are usually pre-production, and bound for just a few more rounds of testing, before being upgraded to "A2" and mass-produced. German tech site 3DCenter.org also pulled out some likely specifications from its sources.

To begin with, the GM200, like the GM204, will be built on existing 28 nm silicon fabrication process, as both NVIDIA and AMD appear to have suffered design setbacks due to their common foundry partner, TSMC, not being able to set its next-gen 20 nm node up to speed in time. The GM200 is expected to feature over 4,000 CUDA cores, although the exact number is unknown. It is expected to widen the memory bus to 512-bit. Given the existing process, the GPU will be huge. Over 600 mm² huge. NVIDIA will probably bank on the energy efficiency of its "Maxwell" architecture to cope with thermal loads put out by a chip that big. The GM200-based "GeForce GTX TITAN II" could launch in the first half of 2015.

Source: 3DCenter.org

NVIDIA GM204 and GM206 to Tape-Out in April, Products to Launch in Q4?

It looks like things are going horribly wrong at TSMC, NVIDIA and AMD's principal foundry partner, with its 20 nm manufacturing process, which is throwing a wrench into the works at NVIDIA, forcing it to re-engineer an entire lineup of "Maxwell" GPUs based on existing 28 nm process. Either that, or NVIDIA is confident of delivering an efficiency leap using Maxwell on existing/mature 28 nm process, and saving costs in the process. NVIDIA is probably drawing comfort from the excellent energy-efficiency demonstrated by its Maxwell-based GeForce GTX 750 series. According to a 3DCenter.org report, NVIDIA's next mainline GPUs, the GM204 and GM206, which will be built on the 28 nm process, and "Maxwell" architecture, will tape out later this month. Products based on the two, however, can't be expected before Q4 2014, as late as December, or even as late as January 2015.

GM204 succeeds GK104 as the company's next workhorse performance-segment silicon, which could power graphics card SKUs ranging all the way from US $250 to $500. An older report suggests that it could feature as many as 3,200 CUDA cores. The GM204 could be taped out in April 2014, and the first GeForce products based on it could launch no sooner than December 2014. The GM206 is the company's next mid-range silicon, which succeeds GK106. It will tape out in April, alongside the GM204, but products based on it will launch only in January 2015. The GM200 is a different beast altogether. There's no mention of which process the chip will be based on, but it will succeed the GK110, and should offer performance increments worthy of being a successor. For that, it has to be based on the 20 nm process. It will tape-out in June 2014, and products based on it will launch only in or after Q2 2015.Source: 3DCenter.org

GM107 Features 128 CUDA Cores Per Streaming Multiprocessor

NVIDIA's upcoming GM107 GPU, the first to be based on its next-generation "Maxwell" GPU architecture, reportedly features a different arrangement of CUDA cores and streaming multiprocessors to those typically associated with "Kepler," although the component hierarchy is similar. The chip reportedly features five streaming multiprocessors, highly integrated computation subunits of the GPU. NVIDIA is referring to these parts as "streaming multiprocessor (Maxwell)," or SMMs.

Further, each streaming multiprocessor features 128 CUDA cores, and not the 192 CUDA cores found in SMX units of "Kepler" GPUs. If true, GM107 features 640 CUDA cores, all of which will be enabled on the GeForce GTX 750 Ti. If NVIDIA is carving out the GTX 750 by disabling one of those streaming multiprocessors, its CUDA core count works out to be 512. NVIDIA will apparently build two GPUs on the existing 28 nm process, the GM107, and the smaller GM108; and three higher performing chips on the next-generation 20 nm process, the GM206, the GM204, and the GM200. The three, as you might have figured out, succeed the GK106, GK104, and GK110, respectively.


Source: VideoCardz
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