News Posts matching "Graphics CoreNext"

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Microsoft to Talk DirectX 12 at GDC

Microsoft will present its first paper on DirectX 12, its next-generation multimedia API, at the Game Developers Conference (GDC), on the 20th of March, 2013. The event could include presentations by NVIDIA, AMD, Intel, and Qualcomm. It's not clear at this point if Microsoft will release developer tools and resources on that day, or simply outline the API to spur interest. If anything, it should gently nudge today's GPU manufacturers to make their future GPU designs ready for the API. There are currently no GPU families that we know of, which support DirectX 12. AMD's current Graphics CoreNext 2.0 GPUs, such as the Radeon R9 290X, support DirectX 11.2, while NVIDIA's "Maxwell" GPUs, such as the GeForce GTX 750 Ti, feature an identical API feature-level support to their "Kepler" predecessors.

Source: MSDN

AMD "Kabini" Low Power APU Lineup Detailed Some More

AMD's upcoming low-power APU lineup, based on a common silicon code-named "Kabini," will launch with no less than five models. These could include chips built in both the socketed AM1 FCPGA and BGA packages, to cater to different target form-factors. The series starts off at the bottom with the dual-core E1-2100 and E1-2150. The two feature CPU clock speeds of 1.00 and 1.05 GHz, respectively, 1 MB of L2 cache, and Radeon HD 8210 graphics. The HD 8210 features 128 stream processors based on the Graphics CoreNext architecture. The CPU cores, on the other hand, are based on the "Jaguar" micro-architecture.

Moving on, there's the E2-3800. It tucks in a quad-core CPU clocked at 1.30 GHz, 2 MB of L2 cache, and Radeon HD 8280 graphics. The features the same stream processor count of 128 as the HD 8210, but higher clock speeds. Going beyond the E-Series, we enter AMD's more popularized A-Series, with the A4-5000, A4-5050, and the A6-5200. The three are built in the AM1 package, and are not compatible with platforms that drive the bigger A-Series "Kaveri" chips. The A4-5000 and A4-5500 feature CPU clock speeds of 1.50 GHz and 1.55 GHz, respectively, and Radeon HD 8330 graphics, featuring 128 stream processors, but 500 MHz GPU clock - the highest in its class. The list also points to an A6-5200. We're not sure which silicon it's based on, but it's outfitted with a quad-core CPU clocked at 2.00 GHz, and Radeon HD 8400 graphics.

Source: WCCFTech

AMD Mantle Driver to Only Benefit Four GPUs Initially

Crushed your F5 key on AMD driver download page yet? Unless you have four very specific AMD Radeon GPUs, you can stop it right now. According to DICE, developers of the first game to take advantage of Mantle, the 3D graphics API AMD is introducing with its Catalyst 14.1 beta driver, will give tangible benefits to only four specific GPUs - Radeon R9 290X, R9 290 (non-X), R7 260X, and A-Series "Kaveri" APU-integrated R7 200 series.

Owners of all other Radeon GPUs, including those based on the Graphics CoreNext (GCN) architecture, such as the recently launched R9 280X and R9 270X, are out of luck, for now. AMD is still ironing out issues with Mantle on those other GCN GPUs. Interestingly, in the same press note, DICE posted performance numbers yielded on an HD 7970, which look promising. AMD is expected to release its Catalyst 14.1 beta driver a little later this week, as it's jousting with some last-minute bug-finds.

Source: DICE

AMD A10-7700K "Kaveri" De-lidded

Here are the first pictures of an AMD A10-7700K "Kaveri" APU with its integrated heat-spreader (IHS, or 'lid') removed. Put next to its predecessors, "Richland," "Trinity," and "Llano," AMD's new APU silicon is its biggest for the DIY PC market, more so because it's built on the 28 nm silicon fab process, compared to its predecessors being built on 32 nm. The die measures roughly 245 mm², and packs a staggering 2.41 billion transistors.

Under the IHS, AMD is using a thermal paste to transport heat from the die, and not a solder. The chip should be easy to de-lid, if you know what you're doing. Kaveri integrates two "Steamroller" x86-64 CPU modules with two cores each, a total of 4 MB of L2 cache, a massive on-die GPU with 512 stream processors based on the Graphics CoreNext micro-architecture, a dual-channel DDR3 IMC with hUMA and DDR3-2400 native support; and a PCI-Express 3.0 root complex.

Source: Akiba PC Hotline

AMD Announces 4th Generation A-Series "Kaveri" Desktop APUs

AMD announced its 2014 A-Series APU for the desktop platform, code-named "Kaveri," after the southern-Indian river. Built in the new FM2+ package, the APUs run only on socket FM2+ motherboards based on the AMD A88X, A78, and A55 chipsets; while the socket itself can seat older FM2 APU families, "Trinity" and "Richland." In many ways, the socket transition is similar to that of socket AM3+. "Kaveri" sees AMD integrate two of its newest CPU and GPU micro-architectures, "Steamroller" for CPU, and Graphics CoreNext 2.0 for the GPU. "Kaveri" is also built on newer generation 28 nm silicon fab process.

"Steamroller" is an evolution of the same modular CPU core design as its predecessors, "Piledriver" and "Bulldozer." AMD promises a 10 percent improvement in performance clock-by-clock, per core, which falls in line with AMD's normal scheme of annual incremental performance updates on its CPU micro-architectures. A "Steamroller" module is a combination of two 64-bit x86 cores, which feature dedicated and shared components. "Kaveri" has two such modules, and so physically, it features a quad-core CPU.

AMD Catalyst 14.1 Beta to Include Mantle and TrueAudio Runtimes

At its CES press-meet, AMD detailed the upcoming versions of Catalyst Software Suite, which will be unified to include graphics and system drivers for both discrete AMD Radeon GPUs, and integrated AMD A-Series APUs; and AMD core-logic (chipsets). The biggest takeaway from the presentation, by AMD's Terry "CatalystMaker" Makedon, is that the company will release the first Mantle and TrueAudio runtime environments with the upcoming Catalyst 14.1 Beta, due for later this month. Mantle is AMD's ambitious attempt at a 3D graphics API to rival Direct3D and OpenGL, that's optimized for its Graphics CoreNext micro-architecture; while TrueAudio is a positional audio DSP that promises to make games and movies sound more realistic.

Mantle promises "great" performance improvements in Battlefield 4, the only AAA game that we know of, to make use of the API. Mantle support was expected to be added to the game as an update around this time, but DICE' plans fell off the track with publisher EA coming down hard on the studio for shipping a game that's riddled with bugs. DICE will most likely have to fix most of its bugs for the retail DirectX 11.1 game, before EA allows it to toy with updates that add support for new and experimental APIs, let alone expansion packs. In related news, Catalyst 14.1 Beta will introduce additions to its frame-pacing fix, that will soon support Ultra HD displays, and Eyefinity setups on non-XDMA (pre R9 290 series) GPUs.


Source: Zol.com.cn

Why the Litecoin Craze Hurts More Than Helps Brand AMD Radeon

Price wars between GPU makers are something to look forward to each year, as that's typically when you get the best bang for your buck. Such an optimal time to buy new graphics cards usually comes when both AMD and NVIDIA have launched a new graphics card lineup, each. AMD tends to launch its lineup first, followed by NVIDIA, which then begins a cycle of proactive and reactive price-cuts between the two, which churns up the $300 price-performance sweet-spot so well, that a purchase from that segment usually sets your PC up for the following three years. 2013-14 saw a major disruption to this cycle, Litecoin mining. Litecoin miners will hurt more than help brand AMD Radeon, here's why.

AMD to Roll Out Eyefinity Frame-Pacing Fix in January

AMD is reportedly releasing a fix for frame-pacing issues for Radeon-based systems with Eyefinity setups in January, 2014, according to an AnandTech report. This September, AMD rolled out the first fix into the frame-pacing issues that affected Radeon GPUs based on the Graphics CoreNext architecture, in which raw-framerate didn't come with the right pacing between each frame, resulting in display output that isn't fluid, which even caused accusations to fly from some quarters about how honest AMD really is with performance numbers of its GPUs.

The Catalyst update that rolled out in September 2013 resolved the problem for a majority of users - with single displays connected to single GPUs, but left out cases in which people use Eyefinity (single display head spanning across multiple physical displays), on CrossFireX (multi-GPU) setups. It was originally expected that AMD would release the so-called "phase 2" Catalyst driver update looking into frame-pacing issues this November, but since the month has passed, AMD has obviously hit a delay. AnandTech reports that delay could last as long as two months, and one should expect "phase 2" to come out only towards the later half of January, since in the first half, AMD, along with the rest of the industry, will be busy with the 2014 International CES, where it will launch its next-generation A-Series APUs, codenamed "Kaveri."Source: AnandTech

Gigabyte Rolls Out Radeon R7 250 OC with Large Air Cooler

Gigabyte rolled out a revision of its Radeon R7 250 OC graphics card, featuring its 100 mm fan-heatsink that featured on its Radeon R7 240 OC graphics card. The card features a blue Ultra Durable 2 PCB, with Gigabyte's in-house fan-heatsink design that uses a chunky aluminium block with copper core and spirally-projecting ridges, and a 100 mm fan ventilating it, suspended on a black ABS shroud. The card features a small factory-overclock on the GPU, at 1100 MHz, compared to AMD reference speeds of 1050 MHz. The 2 GB of DDR3 memory is left untouched at 1.80 GHz. Display outputs include dual-link DVI, D-Sub, and HDMI 1.4a. The card relies entirely on the PCI-Express bus for power. Based on the 28 nm "Oland" silicon, the Radeon R7 250 features 384 Graphics CoreNext stream processors, 24 TMUs, 8 ROPs, and a 128-bit wide memory interface. Expect this card to retail for $90.

AMD Announces the Radeon R9 290

AMD announced the Radeon R9 290, its second graphics card based on the swanky new "Hawaii" silicon. The card is a slight cut-down of the R9 290X, and features 2,560 Graphics CoreNext stream processors, 160 TMUs, 64 ROPs, and a 512-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 4 GB of memory. The core is clocked at 948 MHz, and the memory at 5.00 GHz, churning out a memory bandwidth of 320 GB/s. The reference design board of the R9 290 is practically identical to its older sibling. AMD is pricing the card at an impressive $399, a price at which it will make both the $330 GeForce GTX 770 and the $499 GeForce GTX 780 look repulsively overpriced. Non-reference boards are expected to arrive by late-November, in time for last-minute X'mas purchases.

$450 Pricing Looking Increasingly Likely for Radeon R9 290

MSRP (before taxes) pricing of AMD's upcoming Radeon R9 290 (non-X) being around $450 is looking increasingly likely. In a string of reports that Japanese publication Hermitage Akihabara published ahead of launches of the R9 290X and the R9 290, in which the publication talked about pricing in the country, a price difference of roughly 18 percent is emerging between the two. Applying that to the $549.99 MSRP of the R9 290X stateside, one can derive a $450 pricing for the R9 290. Granted, local taxation may greatly vary between Japan and other markets, affecting the end-user price, but pre-tax MSRPs can be consistent.

The Radeon R9 290 is expected to launch on the 5th of November, 2013. Based on the same "Hawaii" silicon as the Radeon R9 290X, it features 2,560 Graphics CoreNext stream processors, 160 TMUs, 64 ROPs, and a 512-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 4 GB of memory. Its core is clocked around 948 MHz, and memory at 5.00 GHz.

AMD "Kaveri" Desktop APU Launch Date Revealed

A leaked AMD slide detailed key dates in the product launch cycle for the company's next-generation desktop APU, codenamed "Kaveri." The chip will be officially announced on December 5, 2013. This is when AMD will post press-releases about the chip, but lack of market availability will make it more of a soft-launch. The chips should begin to ship to OEM vendors by late-December, 2013. It won't be until mid-February, 2014, that you'll be able to buy one of these chips in the retail channel. Built in the new socket FM2+ package, supporting the company's new A88X chipset, "Kaveri" will feature CPU cores based on the next-generation "Steamroller" micro-architecture, which offers an incremental (conservatively, around 10 percent) performance upgrade over "Piledriver;" a new GPU based on the Graphics CoreNext micro-architecture, TrueAudio technology, support for faster DDR3 memory standards, and PCI-Express gen 3.0 bus interface.


Source: VR-Zone

Radeon R9 290 Performance Figures Leaked, Beats GTX 780

If these performance numbers posted by credible reviewers at OCUK hold up, then AMD could have a second, more affordable graphics card for you, which outperforms NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 780, at least in synthetic benchmarks. In a brief performance run that spans synthetic tests, which included Unigine Heaven 3.0 at 1080p and 1440p resolutions, with normal level of tessellation; 3DMark 11 (performance preset) and 3DMark Fire Strike (both Normal and Extreme); the card we believe to be R9 290 (name blurred out in the graphs) is consistently faster than the GeForce GTX 780 reference, in the same bench.

Based on the same 28 nm "Hawaii" silicon as the Radeon R9 290X, the R9 290 is its more affordable sibling, featuring 2,560 Graphics CoreNext stream processors, 160 TMUs, 64 ROPs, and a 512-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 4 GB of memory. It features clock speeds of 947 MHz (core), and 5.00 GHz (memory, GDDR5-effective). There's no word on pricing, but it could be available from the 31st of October, 2013.

Source: Overclockers UK (OCUK)

Xbox One Doesn't Support AMD Mantle API

As proponents of the DirectX API, which single-handedly shaped consumer 3D graphics market for the past decade and a half, it shouldn't come as a shocker, that Microsoft's next-generation entertainment platform, the Xbox One, will not support AMD's ambitious Mantle project, a 3D API that's tailor-made for the company's Graphics CoreNext GPU micro-architecture, on which the GPU driving the Xbox One is based. The company released a statement to that effect mentioning that "other APIs" such as OpenGL and AMD Mantle won't be supported on Xbox One. Says Microsoft;
We are very excited that with the launch of Xbox One, we can now bring the latest generation of Direct3D 11 to console. The Xbox One graphics API is "Direct3D 11.x" and the Xbox One hardware provides a superset of Direct3D 11.2 functionality. Other graphics APIs such as OpenGL and AMD's Mantle are not available on Xbox One.
The Xbox One will support DirectX 11.2, an evolution over DirectX 11, which adds support for a new feature called "Tiled resources," which lets 3D apps more efficiently manage available hardware resources, by streaming portions of single large textures as a 3D scene being rendered demands it. It heralds a kind of virtual memory system for the GPU, and Microsoft could encourage game developers to take advantage of it, for their Xbox One titles. Such a feature already exists with OpenGL.Source: Microsoft

AMD GPU'14 Event Detailed, Announces Radeon R9 290X

AMD announced the new Radeon R9 290X, its next-generation flagship graphics card. Based on the second-generation Graphics CoreNext micro-architecture, the card is designed to outperform everything NVIDIA has at the moment, including a hypothetical GK110-based graphics card with 2,880 CUDA cores. It's based on the new "Hawaii" silicon, with four independent tessellation units, close to 2,800 stream processors, and 4 GB of memory. The card supports DirectX 11.2, and could offer an inherent performance advantage over NVIDIA's GPUs at games such as "Battlefield 4". Battlefield 4 will also be included in an exclusive preorder bundle. The card will be competitively priced against NVIDIA's offerings. We're awaiting more details.

HIS Announces Radeon HD 7730 iSilence 5

HIS announced the Radeon HD 7730 iSilence 5 graphics card. Identical in design to the Radeon HD 7750 iSilence 5 the company launched this May, the card uses a pin-compatible Radeon HD 7730, and 2 GB of DDR3 memory, across a 128-bit wide memory interface. It offers reference core clock speeds of 800 MHz, with its memory running at 1.60 GHz. Based on the 28 nm "Cape Verde" silicon, it features 384 Graphics CoreNext stream processors, 24 TMUs, and 8 ROPs. The card features a chunky aluminium fin stack heatsink, to which heat is fed by four nickel-plated copper heat pipes. HIS didn't announce pricing.

AMD "Hawaii" R9 290X GPU Specifications Revealed

Here are the first set of specifications for AMD's next high-end GPU silicon, on which the company will no doubt carve out several SKUs from. Codenamed "Hawaii," and slated for unveiling on the 26th in, well, Hawaii, the 28 nm chip is what AMD will take NVIDIA's GK110 silicon head-on with. It is based on AMD's second-generation Graphics CoreNext micro-architecture.

With an estimated die-area of 430 mm² (18% bigger than "Tahiti,") the chip physically features 2,816 stream processors (SPs) spread across 44 clusters with 64 SPs each (a 37.5% increase over "Tahiti"). The chip features four independent raster engines, compared to two independent ones on "Tahiti." This could translate into double the geometry processing muscle as "Tahiti," with four independent tessellation units. The memory interface of the chip is expected to be 384-bit wide, based on the GDDR5 specification. Given the way TMUs are arranged on chips based on this architecture, one can deduce 176 TMUs on the chip. The ROP count could be 32 or 48. The chip will feature hardware support for DirectX 11.2, including the much hyped shared resources (mega-texture) feature.Source: 3DCenter.org
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