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AMD Introduces Phenom II X6 1100T BE, X2 565 BE, Athlon II X3 455

AMD rolled out three new processors today, the six-core Phenom II X6 1100T Black Edition, Athlon II X3 455, and the Phenom II X2 565 Black Edition. The new flagship of AMD's processor lineup, the Phenom II X6 1100T, is based on the AM3 socket, supporting DDR3 and DDR2 memory on older AM2+ motherboards. It carries a nominal clock speed of 3.30 GHz, is based on the 45 nm "Thuban" silicon, features 512 KB of L2 cache per core, and 6 MB of L3 between all six cores. It features the TurboCore technology, which bumps clock speed by a few hundred MHz when it senses high load. As a Black Edition chip, it features an unlocked bus multiplier. Despite its increased clock speed, the 1100T has a TDP of 125W. This chip goes for US $265.

Next up, is the Phenom II X2 565 Black Edition. Clocked at 3.40 GHz, the X2 565 is based on the Callisto silicon (which is Deneb with two cores locked), featuring 512 KB of cache per core, and 6 MB shared L3 cache. This one has a TDP of 80W, and is priced at US $115. Lastly, there's the Athlon II X3 455, a triple-core chip based on the "Rana" silicon (which is Propus with one core locked), it lacks an L3 cache, but features 512 KB L2 per core. With a TDP of 95W, this one goes for $87.

AMD Expands Athlon II Series Processor Lineup

AMD expanded its value processor lineup under the Athlon II banner, with as many as eight new models. The list includes energy-efficient quad-core models, inexpensive triple-core ones, and budget dual-core offerings. All models are based on socket AM3, and are compatible with AM2(+) sockets. The dual-channel memory controllers on these chips support both DDR2 and DDR3 memory standards. This expansion clearly demarcates the target market of the Athlon II series: sub $150.

The quad-core Athlon II X4 parts are based on the Propus die, which has 512 KB of dedicated L2 cache per core, and a HyperTransport 4.0 GT/s system interface. The new Athlon II X3 triple-core models are most likely produced by disabling one of the four cores on the Propus die. The energy efficient Athlon II parts come with the "e" suffix for the model number, and offer lower rated TDP. Following are the details of these new parts:
  • Athlon II X2 235e: 2.70 GHz, 2 MB (2 x 1 MB) L2 cache, 45W TDP, US $69
  • Athlon II X2 240e: 2.80 GHz, 2 MB (2 x 1 MB) L2 cache, 45W TDP, US $77
  • Athlon II X3 400e: 2.20 GHz, 1.5 MB (3 x 512 KB) L2 cache, 45W TDP, US $97
  • Athlon II X3 405e: 2.30 GHz, 1.5 MB (3 x 512 KB) L2 cache, 45W TDP, US $102
  • Athlon II X3 425: 2.70 GHz, 1.5 MB (3 x 512 KB) L2 cache, 95W TDP, US $76
  • Athlon II X3 435: 2.90 GHz, 1.5 MB (3 x 512 KB) L2 cache, 95W TDP, US $87
  • Athlon II X4 600e: 2.20 GHz, 2 MB (4 x 512 KB) L2 cache, 45W TDP, US $133
  • Athlon II X4 605e: 2.30 GHz, 2 MB (4 x 512 KB) L2 cache, 45W TDP, US $143

Some Athlon II X4 Chips Mutate to Phenom II X4

The latest in AMD's almost deliberate series of processors that unlock into powerful / more capable processors is the Athlon II X4. Some of the earliest batches of these sub-$150 quad-core processors can be converted to more powerful Phenom II X4 chips using a simple trick. When unlocked, the chip will be equipped with 6 MB L3 cache. Supposed to have been based on the "Propus" core that physically lack a L3 cache, apparently early batches continue to use the "Deneb" core with L3 cache locked (using moist threads instead of a padlock). Currently there's no information as to which specific batches of Athlon II X4 620 and Athlon II X4 630 work. The trick works on some motherboards that support the Advanced Clock Calibration (ACC) feature. Simply set the ACC option in the BIOS setup to "Auto" from its default value of "Disabled", and you're done.

Source: Silicon Madness

AMD Athlon II X4 ''Propus'' 600 Quad-Core Chips Include 45W Models

AMD's 45 nm desktop processor lineup involves three basic core designs codenamed Deneb, Propus, and Regor. Deneb is the flagship design, which features four cores, two 64-bit DDR2(/DDR3) memory controllers, and a large L3 cache of 6 MB. When one core is disabled, the Phenom II X3 "Heka" processor is yielded, when 2 MB out of the 6 MB of L3 cache is disabled, Phenom II X4 800 series processor is yielded, and when two out of four cores are disabled, Phenom II X2 500 is yielded. To cater to sub-$100 market better, AMD needed to cut the manufacturing costs while maintaining a reasonable level of performance, and substantially low TDP ratings. Hence the company designed the Propus quad-core chip, which physically lacks an L3 cache. The lack of L3 cache chops the transistor load on the die, as well as its TDP. AMD further plans to yield a triple-core Athlon II X3 "Rana" processor using this die, by disabling one of the four cores. The third die design, Regor, features no more than two cores physically, and lacks an L3 cache. As an added bonus, the L2 cache per core is doubled to 1024 KB (2 MB total L2 cache), and HyperTransport multiplier set high (10 x 200 MHz).

Some of AMD's first products based on Propus have surfaced thanks to a leak from a motherboard manufacturer. It reveals an initial lineup of four models, including two low-wattage ones. Enter Athlon II X4 600e, 605e, 620, and 630. These chips' clock speeds range between 2.20 and 2.80 GHz. Unlike with Regor, each core on the Propus keeps 512 KB of L2 cache, which makes it 2 MB of total L2 cache. The most surprising part of the specs is the TDP of the low-wattage chips, with the 2.20 GHz 600e and 2.40 GHz 605e, is 45W. In comparison, it took a clock-speed of 2.00 GHz for the previous-generation 65 nm Agena core to reach a TDP rating of 65W. The 2.60 GHz 620 and 2.80 GHz 630 have TDP ratings of 65W. We reckon these chips to hit shelves in this quarter. Below is a die-shot of the Propus core. It bears quite some resemblance to its 65 nm ancestor.

Source: Hardware-Infos

AMD Desktop CPU Schedule Updated

AMD, on the brink of making a start with its first desktop CPUs made on the 45nm manufacturing process, seems to have updated time-frames in which it will introduce new CPUs and manage inventories of currently available CPUs. Data compiled by DigiTimes from sources in the motherboard manufacturing industry points towards the following in 2009:
  • The introduction of four new SKUs in the months of April, that include Athlon X4 (Propus core) 615 and 605, Athlon X3 (Rana core) 420 and 410, followed by Athlon X2 (Regor core) 240 and 235 in June
  • Last orders for Phenom X4 9850 and 9950 (140W) to be taken in March, Phenom X4 9750, 9850 (95W) and 9950 (125W) will be in June, before which Phenom II X4 920 and 940 in May (in most likelihood replaced by models 925 and 945)
  • Phase-out of Phenom X3 8450 and 8550 started, that of Phenom X3 8650 in March followed by Phenom X3 8850 and 8750 in June
  • Last order notice for Athlon X2 4450e to be issued in March
Source: DigiTimes

Phenom II Final Nomenclature and Launch-Schedule Revealed

AMD would be releasing its 45nm silicon-based desktop CPUs, built on the Deneb, Propus, Heka, Rana and Regor cores, to bring out quad-core, triple-core and eventually dual-core processors. AMD has discarded the 5-digit number scheme that was earlier reported, and in its place, adopted a three-digit scheme. The quad-core Deneb chips get a 9xx model number and 8xx number depending on the clock-speeds and cache size, Propus-based chips get the Athlon X4 branding.

Heka-based chips get Phenom II X3 7xx branding, with Rana getting Athlon X3 4xx. Regor dual-core trails with Athlon X2 2xx. It is important to note that AMD seems to have made a critical change to the Deneb core, releasing 2 models based on cache-arrangements. The first kind features a total of 8 MB cache (4x 512K L2 + 6M L3) and one with 6 MB total cache. To learn more about the other cores, please refer to our older article getting into details (here).

Phenom X4, X3 45nm Lineup for H1 2009 Explained

AMD would be releasing its first desktop processors based on the 45nm silicon fabrication process, based on the newer Deneb core. The company is said to have made several tweaks to the original K10 design and equipped the core with 300% the amount of L3 cache as its 65nm Agena parts. The only thing got us wondering was what would be its nomenclature like? Well, be surprised to know that after Phenom X4 9000 series, the company plans to continue the numbering with a 5-digit model number scheme with x1000 unit deviations between models. A rather confusing naming scheme, as suggested by the chart provided, seems to have been adopted.

It is now clear, that there will be two distinct kinds of Phenom X4 45nm chips: those which continue support for DDR2 memory on the existing AM2/AM2+ sockets, and those which are exclusive to the AM3 socket and feature support for DDR3 memory, DDR3 1333MHz at that. The processors would feature dual 64-bit memory controllers, which could be ganged for a single 128-bit wide memory interface, or un-ganged to step up multi-tasking efficiency.

AMD Desktop Roadmap for 2009 Reveals no Surprises

Without doubt, AMD needs something revolutionary to pull it out of the mess it set itself in. AMD's first reaction to the Conroe onslaught was to lower prices and build up a "Smarter Choice" repute, though with successive price cuts from Intel and down-scale products based on the Core architecture coming out by the fortnight, and the transit to 45nm fab process, there's been an increasing need for AMD to get back to the drawing boards with their CPU division.

From what looks like an excerpt from an AMD company slide, can be seen AMD's CPU plans for 2009. The chart broadly shows that K10 architecture is here to stay. Throughout the year, desktop CPUs based on the K10 architecture feature in the roadmap, with no signs of their "truly next-gen" architecture. AMD completes its transit to the 45nm silicon fabrication process and will finally embrace DDR3 system memory standards. To begin with, the fact that the Deneb core's entry slightly steps into the 2008 column shows that the Deneb core-based desktop CPU could release sometime towards the very end of this year. Sources note that two models based on the Deneb core could be out by the end of this year. It supports both DDR2 and DDR3 memory standards and socket compatible with current AM2+ and future AM3. From what's known so far, AM3 is the same 940 pin design that adds pins for the DDR3 memory interconnect between the CPU and the memory.
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