News Posts matching "Turks"

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Orbis Implements Multi-GPU, Too

Sony's next-generation PlayStation, reportedly codenamed "Orbis", is known to be powered by an AMD x86-64 CPU with graphics based on its Southern Islands architecture, from the older report. We're now hearing that Sony may implement a multi-GPU solution of its own. According to an IGN.com report, the CPU in question will be a custom-version of AMD's A8-3850 quad-core APU. This should serve as indication that the processor cores will be based on AMD's K10 Stars architecture, rather than K15 Bulldozer/Piledriver.

The GPU, on the other hand, will be based on the "Southern Islands" architecture, and the IGN.com report pin points it to resemble Radeon HD 7670. The HD 7670 is a re-branded HD 6670, which is based on the 40 nm "Turks" GPU. Turks uses neither Graphics CoreNext nor VLIW4, but the older VLIW5 number-crunching machinery. The most interesting piece of information here is talk of a multi-GPU configuration between this Turks-based GPU, and the GPU that's embedded into the "Llano" APU. We know that the graphics core embedded into AMD A8-3850, the Radeon HD 6550D, can work in tandem with Radeon HD 6670 to yield an AMD Hybrid CrossFireX configuration called "Radeon HD 6690D2". This could be end up being Sony's graphics weapon of choice.

AMD Slips Out Radeon HD 7670 to OEMs

Without making any noise, AMD rolled out an OEM-exclusive graphics card model, the Radeon HD 7670. This GPU is completely identical to the previous-generation Radeon HD 6670, making it a rebrand. It has identical specifications to the 40 nm Turks GPU, which drives the retail HD 6670, with 480 VLIW5 stream processors, a 128-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface holding 512 MB or 1 GB of memory, 24 TMUs, 8 ROPs, and clock speeds of 800 MHz core, and 4.00 GHz memory. This GPU was featured on some of HP's desktop PC products. The product page of this OEM-only GPU can be found here.

Source: Anandtech

AMD Radeon HD 7400M, HD 7500M, and HD 7600M Released

Over the week, AMD launched three of the first notebook GPUs in the Radeon HD 7000 series in a bid to stay competitive in the notebook GPU market, even if it means re-branding already launched GPUs like NVIDIA did, with its recent GeForce 600M series launch. The newly [re]launched mGPUs include Radeon HD 7400M, HD 7500M, and HD 7600M. The three are based on current-generation Caicos and Turks GPUs.

The HD 7400M is based on the "Caicos" silicon, featuring 160 stream processors, 8 TMUs, 4 ROPs, and a 64-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface. The HD 7500M and HD 7600M are based on the "Turks" silicon, the HD 7500M features 480 stream processors, 24 TMUs, 8 ROPs, and 64-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface (more economical with lower number of memory chips, while offering the same performance as 128-bit DDR3); while the HD 7600M features all the features of the HD 7500M, including the full 128-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface.Source: Anandtech

Several Entry-thru-mid Radeon HD 7000 GPUs Mere Rebrands

Want a new graphics card this shopping season? Is news of Radeon HD 7000 series arriving late this year or early next year holding you back from purchasing current-generation? Don't let it, go grab that graphics card you had your eyes on. Fairly reliable sources point out that a bulk of Radeon HD 7000 series graphics cards will be based on rebranded current and previous generation GPUs. This bulk mostly spans across the entry-thru-mid range of the product lineup. Familiar GPU codenames such as Cedar, Caicos, and Turks, make a comeback with Radeon HD 7300 series, HD 7400 series, HD 7500 series, and HD 7600 series.

Moving up the ladder, the source postulates two possibilities for Radeon HD 7700 series. First, and more plausible, is that the series is based on Juniper (a hop across two previous generations!); the second is that these make use of rechristened GPUs from a slightly higher market position from the previous generation. Perhaps Barts, perhaps even highly crippled Cayman. The only real next-generation GPU is codenamed "Tahiti", but we're hearing that graphics cards based on it are said to not follow the Radeon HD 7000 series nomenclature altogether.

Source: ChipHell

TechPowerUp GPU-Z 0.5.4 Released

TechPowerUp released the latest version of GPU-Z, our popular graphics hardware information and monitoring utility. Version 0.5.4 packs a large number of changes, beginning with faster start-up, support for the entire line of NVIDIA GeForce 500M series GPUs, new models of Intel Sandy Bridge processor graphics, a number of AMD Radeon HD 6000M series GPUs, improved support for AMD APUs, and a number of bug fixes.

GPU-Z has overcome the slow start-up issue on AMD Radeon GPUs, it loads slightly faster on NVIDIA GPUs, too. ROP count reading on AMD Radeon HD 6790, Turks & Whistler was fixed; along with sensor count on Caicos, Whistler, Turks. OpenCL detection on some NVIDIA drivers was fixed. The ability to read UMA-shared memory on AMD APU systems was added. GPU-Z has better ability to detect and warn of spurious graphics cards with faked IDs. GPU-Z 0.5.4 is available in both its standard form and the ASUS Republic of Gamers themed variant.

DOWNLOAD: GPU-Z 0.5.4 | GPU-Z 0.5.4 ASUS ROG Themed

A complete list of changes with this version follows.

AMD Gives Names to Dual-GPU Configurations Between APUs and Discrete GPUs

Years ago, AMD's integrated graphics chipsets offered users the ability to pair integrated graphics processors with entry-level discrete graphics cards to work in tandem, and increased performance ideally by 50%, this technology was called Hybrid CrossFire. With the latest AMD A-Series APUs, AMD is packing much more powerful GPU components, and in the process, giving users the ability to pair the GPU component with a discrete graphics card. In the discrete graphics sphere, AMD CrossFireX already allows the pairing between two graphics cards that use the same ASIC, even if they're different models (for example, you can pair a Radeon HD 5770 with a HD 5750).

The GPU component inside A-Series APUs are essentially similar to lower mid-range discrete GPUs from AMD's current generation, in having 400, 320, or 240 stream processors, giving you the ability to pair them with discrete graphics cards based on Turks (HD 6500 and HD 6600 series) or Caicos (HD 6300 and HD 6400 series). Unlike with Hybrid CrossFireX, AMD gave marketing names to the resulting dual-GPU setup between an APU and a discrete GPU. For example, pairing an A8-3850's APU with a discrete Radeon HD 6670 GDDR5 will give you a configuration "called" Radeon HD 6990D2. We see what you did there, AMD. So the next time you're buying a pre-assembled PC and you see "HD 6990D2" in the specs sheet, and the entire PC is priced under $800, you have no reason to jump through the roof in joy. Refer to the table below for more amazing configuration names.

Source: VR-Zone

Club 3D Introduces the New Radeon HD 6570 1 GB DDR3

Club 3D B.V. announces the intro-duction of the AMD Radeon HD 6570 video card based on the Turks PRO chipset, AMD’ second generation DirectX 11.The Club 3D Radeon HD 6570 1 GB DDR3 video card features now the AMD HD3D technology which allows you to have faster access to multimedia applications and gives you all tools to enhanced productivity. Furthermore you can enjoy the latest 3D Blu-Ray movies with EyeSpeed technology. The new card comes equipped with a nice single slot cooler which makes you enjoy your new video card without compromising on your perfect computing environment.

Club 3D Intros New Radeon HD 6670 Graphics Card

Club 3D B.V. announces the introduction of the AMD Radeon HD 6670 video card based on the Turks XT chipset, AMD’ second generation DirectX 11. The new Club 3D Radeon HD 6670 1 GB GDDR5 video card features now the AMD HD3D technology which allows you to have faster access to multimedia applications and gives you all tools to enhanced productivity.

Furthermore you can enjoy the latest 3D Blu-ray movies with EyeSpeed technology. The new card comes equipped with a nice single slot cooler which makes you enjoy your new video card without compromising on your perfect computing environment.

Radeon HD 6670, HD 6570 Performance Estimates Out

Slated for Tuesday, 19th April, AMD new mainstream DirectX 11 compliant graphics cards, the Radeon HD 6670, and HD 6570, have been drawing some attention as two of the last products to launch in the HD 6000 series. It will probably only be with the HD 7000 series slated for who knows when, that AMD will release new GPUs. DonanimHaber put a HD 6670 and two HD 6570 graphics cards, along with a GeForce GT 440 (NVIDIA's fastest card in the segment), through 3DMark Vantage and 3DMark 11, in performance and extreme presets. The Radeons emerged faster overall. The HD 6670 and HD 6570 are designed for price points below $100.

Source: DonanimHaber

Radeon HD 6450 Launch Clubbed with HD 6570, HD 6670 Launches, on 19th April

When the entry-level Radeon HD 6450 launches this 19th April, it will not be alone. AMD will back it with product launches of both the Radeon HD 6570 and Radeon HD 6670, according to fresh reports. With it, AMD will have completed its Radeon HD 6000 series product launches, in almost all price-points, top to bottom. Incidentally, the three were also launched together as OEM-only products back in February.

Based on the 40 nm Caicos silicon, HD 6450 packs 160 stream processors, and a 64-bit wide GDDR5/GDDR3 memory interface, designed for low-profile, single-slot graphics cards. The HD 6570 and HD 6670, on the other hand, are both based on the 40 nm Turks GPU, both feature 480 stream processors and 128-bit wide GDDR5 interface. The two are differentiated with the HD 6570 having lower clock speeds.

Source: Expreview

AMD Outs Radeon HD 6670, HD 6570, HD 6450 for OEMs

AMD released the entire entry-mid portion of the Radeon HD 6000 series overnight, for OEMs only. The cards won't be available to consumers (retail) as yet, but does give away specifications of two new GPUs that AMD is carving these SKUs out of, Turks and Caicos. Built on the 40 nm process, Turks packs 480 VLIW5 stream processors, is DirectX 11 compliant, and sports a 128-bit wide GDDR5 memory controller that supports GDDR3 on lower SKUs. Radeon HD 6670 and HD 6570 are based on Turks. Both have all 480 stream processors enabled, differ in memory type/amount and clock speeds. The HD 6670 carries clock speeds of 800 MHz core, 1000 MHz (4.00 GHz GDDR5 effective) memory, and is available with memory amounts of 512 MB or 1 GB. The 128-bit wide memory interface churns out bandwidth of 64 GB/s.

The HD 6570 is also based on Turks, but features clock speeds of 650 MHz core, and two different memory clock speed specifications based on the memory type opted for by the manufacturers. If a manufacturer chooses GDDR3, it's clocked at 900 MHz (1.80 GHz GDDR3 effective), with a memory bandwidth of 28.8 GB/s. If it's GDDR5, it's clocked at 1000 MHz (4.00 GHz effective), 64 GB/s bandwidth. Up to 2 GB of memory can be opted for GDDR3 designs, while up to 1 GB can be opted for GDDR5-based ones. While the HD 6670 reference board uses a full-height design with a single-slot fan-heatsink, HD 6570 is designed for low-profile cards, best suited for HTPCs or SFF PCs.
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