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MSI TwinFrozr V Cooling Solution Teased

MSI teased the first CGI sketches of its next-generation TwinFrozr V cooling solution, designed for high-end GPUs, under its Gaming Series. A prototype of the cooler made its first appearance at Computex 2014, in June. The cooler features a large dual-stack aluminium fin heatsink to which heat drawn from the GPU is fed by five 8 mm thick nickel-plated copper heat pipes. The fin-stack is ventilated by a pair of what's now appearing to be two 100 mm fans. MSI is rumored to be innovating a new impeller design that steps up air-flow to noise ratio.

It's interesting to note that in its CGI render of a card equipped with this cooler, MSI showed a PCB with two NVIDIA SLI bridge fingers, and two 6-pin PCIe power inputs. Could this be the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980, in effect making the card the MSI GTX 980 Gaming OC? Wait until the 19th of September to find out. GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970 are NVIDIA's next high-end GPUs, based on the 28 nm "GM204" silicon, derived from the company's new "Maxwell" architecture.


Source: MyDrivers

ADATA DDR4 OC Module Spotted on a Working Haswell-E HEDT System

ADATA's claim of being the first memory maker with DDR4 overclocking modules wouldn't fly with anyone, if they weren't using a live Haswell-E HEDT platform to show it off. The system appears to be using a prototype Intel X99 chipset micro-ATX motherboard by ASRock, and a Haswell-E engineering sample. The module comes with JEDEC SPD profile of 2133 MHz, but claims to offer tons of overclocking headroom. The system was wired to a display, and evidently, CPU-Z can't read the memory config. It can, however, read out DRAM clock and timings. The system was doing 1373 MHz (2746 MHz DDR), with timings of 14-14-14-36-CR2T.

Noctua U-type Compact CPU Cooler Gets an Update

Noctua gave its U-type compact CPU cooler prototype a second showing at Computex. The cooler was displayed with a pair of 65 mm fans. The design goal of the cooler is to provide tower-type ventilation (in which hot air is pushed out of the case through the rear fan vent), in a package the size of a compact top-flow one. A dense aluminium fin heatsink, to which heat drawn from a nickel-plated base, is fed by four 6 mm thick heat pipes, is ventilated side-ways, by a pair of 65 mm fans in partial push-pull configuration. The cooler, by the looks of it, should be able to handle most mainstream CPUs, even with some overclocks thrown in. There's still no word on when Noctua plans to launch it.

Lian Li to Showcase DK01 Desk Chassis at CeBIT 2014

Lian-Li Industrial Co. Ltd, is pleased to announce that the DK01 desk chassis, along with community collaborated chassis and two unreleased models, will be on display at CeBIT 2014 in Hannover, Germany from March 10 to 14, 2014. Lian Li invites all interested parties to visit them at Hall 17, Booth F24. Combining the symbiotic relationship of desks and computer cases, the DK01 is a chassis like no other. Constructed of aluminum, this hybrid chassis allows DIY builders to build a full computer inside the desk and show off their hardware creations through the tempered glass desktop. The DK01 eliminates the need for PC towers.

Modified according to feedback across the social media and tech media sphere, the newly released, community collaborated PC-A51 mid-tower chassis as well as the updated versions of the previewed PC-B16 and PC-A61 will also be on display at Lian Li's booth. These three fully aluminum chassis are a conglomeration of user feedback on prototype models and Lian Li's time-honed expertise and engineering capabilities. Visitors to the booth will be able to provide their feedback for the PC-B16 and PC-A61 as well as the DK01, which will be updated additionally after the show.

Lian Li Previews PC-B16 and PC-A61 Cases Ahead of CeBIT

Lian Li posted pictures of prototypes of two of its upcoming cases, the PC-B16 and PC-A61 (pictured in that order). The two will be launched in March, at the 2014 CeBIT. Both cases are based on a common frame design (the same innards), but the PC-B16 has an added level of noise reduction with its front door. Measuring 230 mm x 490 mm x 530 mm (WxDxH), the two dry-weigh around 6.5 kg. Color options include all-black (including interiors); and white (with bare aluminium interiors).

The PC-B16 and PC-A61 feature a unique new drive cage design, in which individual 3.5-inch drive bays can be detached, so you don't have to lose 3-4 bays just to make room for a dual-slot graphics card of abnormal length. Each bay has retention holes for two 9.5 mm-thick 2.5-inch drives. With the drive bays in place, you get room for graphics cards as long as 280 mm. With the bays out of the way, your cards can be as much as 420 mm long. There's room for CPU coolers as tall as 170 mm. Behind the motherboard tray, there's a crawl-space of 30 mm, letting you comfortably manage even the thickest cable your PSU throws at you (the 24-pin ATX). Cooling system on the PC-B16 and PC-A61 include two 120 mm front intakes, a 120 mm rear exhaust, and two top 140 mm exhausts. Lian Li didn't finalize pricing, or even the design for that matter, and is taking in community feedback. Fire away.

Lian Li DK01 Desk-Type Chassis Prototype Unveiled

Lian Li is feeling experimental again. After taking the PC enthusiast community's opinion on the PC-A51 prototype late last year, the company undertook another such exercise, this time with an emerging form-factor, desk-type chassis, chassis that doubles up as your desk. The DK-01 prototype by Lian Li Measures 800 mm x 795 mm x 600 mm (WxHxD), the business end of the case is its top drawer, which houses your hardware, and metal u-frames that make up its legs. A clear glass or acrylic top gives you a bird's eye view of your creation from above.

The DK01 features room for a gargantuan HPTX motherboard, which means it can also hold EATX, XL-ATX, and standard ATX motherboards. The case has room for up to fourteen (14) 3.5-inch drives, which are arranged in detachable bays. Removing half the bays creates room for large motherboards, and long (up to 410 mm) add-on cards. With the caddies in place, that room shrinks to a still respectable 280 mm. The case supports PSUs as long as 280 mm, and CPU coolers as tall as 180 mm. At various locations, there is room for up to seven 120 mm fans, which you can use to deploy a 240 x 120 mm and 360 x 120 mm radiators.
More pictures follow.

ASUS Z87-Deluxe/SATA-Express Detailed

ASUS released a prototype of the first desktop PC motherboard with SATA-Express support, the Z87-Deluxe/SATA-Express. A variant of ASUS' flagship socket LGA1150 motherboard from its mainline Z87 series, the Z87-Deluxe, the board features two SATA-Express ports. SATA-Express sees a fusion between two of the most successful serial I/O interfaces, SATA and PCI-Express. It's essentially ATA over PCI-Express 2.0 x2, which offers a raw bandwidth of 8 Gbps per direction, 16 Gbps total. The SATA-Express port is structured similar to the classic SATA port, with PCI-Express lanes running over two 7-pin SATA connectors, and an additional block of 4 pins that make up the 18 pins required by 2-lane PCI-Express. A SATA-Express connector is thus unified, and legacy SATA devices should still be able to run off one of the two 7-in SATA connectors in a SATA-Express block.

Since there are no SATA-Express drives in the market, ASUS gave TweakTown a MacGyver contraption that adapts SATA-Express to a physical PCI-Express 2.0 x4 slot (electrical x2). An ASUS RAIDR Express PCI-Express SSD was found to offer sequential transfer rates of around 750 MB/s on ATTO. The rest of the board is practically identical to the Z87-Deluxe. The board uses a 16-phase VRM to condition power for the LGA1150 CPU. It draws power from a combination of 24-pin ATX and 8-pin EPS connectors. Expansion slots include three PCI-Express 3.0 x16 (x16/NC/NC or x8/x8/NC or x8/x4/x4, depending on how they're populated); and four PCI-Express 2.0 x1 slots.

iBuyPower Previews AMD-Powered Steam Machine

Next year PC maker iBuyPower is planning to embrace Valve's Steam OS and release its own Steam Machine. Seen below in prototype form, iBuyPower's upcoming Steam OS-running 'console' looks a bit like a PlayStation 4, design-wise, and packs an AMD processor (likely an APU) and AMD Radeon R9 270 graphics card (in contrast, Valve's own Steam Box prototypes have Intel CPUs and NVIDIA GPUs), and a 500 GB hard drive.

The iBuyPower Steam Machine also has a glossy white chassis with a customizable light bar, and is set to cost $499 (as much as an Xbox One). The Steam Controller wasn't mentioned but it's likely at least one will be bundled.

Source: The Verge

Asetek to Demo RackCDU Liquid Cooled 92 Node HPC Cluster at SC13

Asetek will showcase its range of RackCDU hot water liquid cooling systems for HPC data centers at SC13 including a running 92 node cluster cooled by RackCDU D2C (Direct to Chip) with monitoring software providing real-time reporting and alerting in Denver, Colorado - November 18-21.

Asetek's RackCDU range includes RackCDU D2C and RackCDU ISAC (In-Server Air Conditioning). RackCDU D2C provides cooling cost reductions up to 80% and density increases of 2.5x-5x. RackCDU ISAC provides cooling cost reductions exceeding 80% and enables operation without concern for air quality. Operating demonstrations of both technologies will be on display in Asetek's booth #4329.

Micron Unveils Serial NOR Flash Interface for Future Ultrathin Devices

Micron Technology, Inc., today announced the availability of a replay-protected monotonic counter (RPMC) feature for their SPI NOR Flash memory devices, which are validated for future Intel Ultrabook platforms. The cost-effective 64Mb density is the sweet-spot solution currently available for immediate platform-enablement activities.

The RPMC feature in Micron's SPI NOR device is the first in a family of cryptographic primitives that will significantly enhance preboot security in cost-sensitive embedded, mobile, and personal computing architectures. The RPMC-enabled device facilitates critical nonvolatile data storage, while making systems resistant to rollback and replay attacks. It enables original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to further strengthen code/data storage in the boot memory and deliver more secure systems to customers.

Intel Shows Off Prototype Thunderbolt Thumb Drive

On Thursday at Computex, Intel unveiled a prototype thumb drive which employs the Thunderbolt interface and claims data transfer speeds of up to 10 Gbps. Dubbed the "world's fastest thumb drive," Intel's prototype device boasts transfer speeds far beyond those reachable by established standards such as the omnipresent USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 devices, of which the latter attains a theoretical maximum transfer speed of 5 Gbps.

The small drive hosts a 128 GB SanDisk SSD and connects directly to a Thunderbolt port on your PC or laptop, dismissing the need for the usually expensive cables associated with Thunderbolt peripherals, typically external storage solutions but also monitors. Thunderbolt hasn't seen wide adoption yet, primarily because of high costs, both implementation costs (expensive controllers) as well as adoption costs (few and expensive compatible devices). However that could soon change, seeing how many motherboards that offer Thunderbolt support were unveiled only in the last few days at Computex, one would think that Intel's Haswell platform could accelerate Thunderbolt adoption despite lacking native chipset support for the standard.
Source: PCWorld

Noctua Unveils Prototype CPU Cooler with Active Noise-cancellation

A star attraction at Noctua's Computex booth was a prototype CPU air cooler featuring an active noise-cancellation technology co-developed by RotoSub. Pictured below, this aluminum monstrosity looks like a huge fanless cubical fin-stack, but in reality, is a D-type (twin-tower) heatsink with a large fan between its two stacks, equipped with active noise cancellation device. It works much in the same way as noise-cancellation in premium headphones and smartphones. A mic inputs noise from the cooler, speakers give out the same noise with a phase difference, this causes destructive interference between noise coming from the speakers and the cooler, and noise is reduced. The speakers are positioned along each of the two fin-stacks. The mics are just as discrete. Noctua stuck a mic into the test chamber with the cooler running, and visitors couldn't hear a thing, at least nothing that's louder than the morning crowds at Nangang, after the event has been opened up to the general public. The technology 'sounds' promising.

Razer Launches Atrox Arcade Stick with Support From Fighting Game Community

Razer, the world leader in high-performance gaming hardware, software and systems, today announced the Razer Atrox Arcade Stick for Xbox 360, the final product following an extensive beta testing program. Tested by some of the world's best pro-gamers and Fighting Game Community members all over the world, the Razer Atrox Arcade Stick is constructed with modders and tournament gamers in mind. Featuring premium quality Sanwa components, the 10 highly responsive buttons and a precision eight-way joystick allow gamers to strike instantly and surely, game after game, while maintaining peak performance and reliability.

An extremely moddable controller, the inside of the arcade stick platform opens up at the touch of a button, making the Razer Atrox a breeze to customize for all tastes and play styles. Users can swap in their own personal designs for a unique look, while also getting access to the internal compartments and honeycomb structure for easy screw mounting.

Intel, Facebook Collaborate on Future Data Center Rack Technologies

Intel Corporation announced a collaboration with Facebook to define the next generation of rack technologies used to power the world's largest data centers. As part of the collaboration, the companies also unveiled a mechanical prototype built by Quanta Computer* that includes Intel's new, innovative photonic rack architecture to show the total cost, design and reliability improvement potential of a disaggregated rack environment.

"Intel and Facebook are collaborating on a new disaggregated, rack-scale server architecture that enables independent upgrading of compute, network and storage subsystems that will define the future of mega-datacenter designs for the next decade," said Justin Rattner, Intel's chief technology officer during his keynote address at Open Computer Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. "The disaggregated rack architecture includes Intel's new photonic architecture, based on high-bandwidth, 100 Gbps Intel Silicon Photonics Technology, that enables fewer cables, increased bandwidth, farther reach and extreme power efficiency compared to today's copper based interconnects."

Case Western University Researchers Develop Tech Aimed at Making 2 TB Optical Discs

Case Western Reserve University researchers have developed technology aimed at making an optical disc that holds 1 to 2 terabytes of data -- the equivalent of 1,000 to 2,000 copies of Encyclopedia Britannica. The entire print collection of the Library of Congress could fit on five to 10 discs. The discs would provide small- and medium-sized businesses an alternative to storing data on energy-wasting magnetic disks or cumbersome magnetic tapes, the researchers say. To push technology to market, the leaders of the effort have launched a company.

"A disc will be on the capacity scale of magnetic tapes used for archival data storage," said Kenneth Singer, the Ambrose Swasey professor of physics, and co-founder of Folio Photonics. "But, they'll be substantially cheaper and have one advantage: you can access data faster. You just pop the disc in your computer and you can find the data in seconds. Tapes can take minutes to wind through to locate particular data."

OUYA: A Hacker-Friendly Android Console

A new Kickstarter project is making waves, by proposing an open-source, hacker-friendly platform using Android as its backbone. "OUYA" merges the "satisfying" experience of a console with the developer-friendly nature of the Android marketplace. The project is seeking nearly a million dollars in funds, but it's already managed to reach more than half its lofty goal within just a day. The project's goal is $950,000, a figure it's likely to hit. It's been less than a day, and it's hit more than $590,000. That's no doubt because the higher dollar amounts, $95 and $99, offer the console itself as a reward. So far, the project hasn't outlined any stretch goals, but they seem likely. The funding will go towards converting the prototype to production models with approvals from regulatory agencies, development kits, production orders, and possibly some first-party game development. It also claims that games will be required to offer a free element, be it a demo or the full game with microtransactions. OUYA has already specified its technical specs, including a Tegra3 quad-core processor, 1 GB of RAM, 8 GB of flash storage, an HDMI connection, and Android 4.0. The controller looks fairly standard for consoles, with eight action buttons, two analog sticks, a D-pad, and the addition of a touch pad.

Source: Shacknews

Turtle Beach and Major League Gaming to Introduce New Tournament Headsets

Turtle Beach, pioneers and market-leaders of the gaming headset category, and Major League Gaming (MLG), the world's largest competitive video game league, today announce a multi-year product and marketing partnership under which Turtle Beach will develop the official headsets and audio equipment of Major League Gaming. The first official products offered under this partnership will be MLG versions of the all-new Ear Force XP7 and Z7 MLG Pro Circuit Programmable Surround Sound Headsets for console and PC play, along with the Ear Force TM1 Tournament Audio Mixer.

Slated for release in Fall 2012, working prototypes of these exciting new game audio products and others from the Turtle Beach line will be available for preview in Turtle Beach's Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) booth; Los Angeles Convention Center South Hall #2447, from June 5 – 7, 2012. MLG Pro Players will be on hand to help introduce the new products, with appearances in the Turtle Beach booth daily from 2-3 p.m. PT.

RotoSub and Noctua Announce Partnership for PC Fans with Noise Cancellation

Noise reduction specialist RotoSub and renowned quiet cooling fan manufacturer Noctua today announced a strategic partnership agreement for the development and commercialisation of PC fans with integrated Active Noise Cancellation (ANC). A first prototype of a Noctua fan with integrated RotoSub ANC technology will be shown at Computex Taipei next week.

Active Noise Cancellation (also referred to as Active Noise Control or Active Noise Reduction, ANC) is the technique of using sound waves to reduce noise by means of an effect called phase cancellation or destructive interference. Lars Strömbäck and Mårten Oretorp from RotoSub have invented a system (RotoSub Active Noise Control, R-ANC) that allows a fan to emit the sound signal that cancels out the original sound of the fan and thereby greatly reduces the overall noise emission.

Canon To Exhibit Prototype of 30-Inch 4K Industrial Video Display at NAB 2012

Canon Inc. today announced that the Company is developing a 30-inch, 4K resolution industrial video display, a prototype of which will be exhibited from April 16 to 19 at the NAB Show 2012, the world's largest international digital event for audio, video, film, broadcast and communications, held in Las Vegas.

The prototype to be displayed will provide support for cinema and other video editing processes while also responding to film production needs for consistency and reliability through proprietary Canon high image-quality technology. While detailed specifications and pricing have yet to be finalized, Canon aims to commercialize the display before the end of 2012.


Source: Engadget

Announcing a Breakthrough in Quantum Communication

A team of scientists at the MPQ realizes a first elementary quantum network based on interfaces between single atoms and photons. Whether it comes to phoning a friend or to using the internet – our daily communication is based on sophisticated networks, with data being transferred at the speed of light between different nodes. It is a tremendous challenge to build corresponding networks for the exchange of quantum information. These quantum networks would differ profoundly from their classical counterparts: Besides giving insights into fundamental questions in physics, they could also have applications in secure communication and the simulation of complex many-body systems, or they could be used for distributed quantum computing. One prerequisite for functional quantum networks are stationary nodes that allow for the reversible exchange of quantum information.

A major breakthrough in this field has now been achieved by scientists in the group of Professor Gerhard Rempe, director at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and head of the Quantum Dynamics division: The physicists have set up the first, elementary quantum network (Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature11023, 12 April 2012). It consists of two coupled single-atom nodes that communicate quantum information via the coherent exchange of single photons. “This approach to quantum networking is particularly promising because it provides a clear perspective for scalability”, Professor Rempe points out.

Holey Optochip First to Transfer One Trillion Bits per Second Using Light

IBM scientists today will report on a prototype optical chipset, dubbed “Holey Optochip”, that is the first parallel optical transceiver to transfer one trillion bits – one terabit – of information per second, the equivalent of downloading 500 high definition movies. The report will be presented at the Optical Fiber Communication Conference taking place in Los Angeles.

With the ability to move information at blazing speeds – eight times faster than parallel optical components available today – the breakthrough could transform how data is accessed, shared and used for a new era of communications, computing and entertainment. The raw speed of one transceiver is equivalent to the bandwidth consumed by 100,000 users at today’s typical 10 Mb/s high-speed internet access. Or, it would take just around an hour to transfer the entire U.S. Library of Congress web archive through the transceiver.

University of Utah Students Unveil A New Direction for Game Controllers

University of Utah engineers designed a new kind of video game controller that not only vibrates like existing devices, but pulls and stretches the thumb tips in different directions to simulate the tug of a fishing line, the recoil of a gun or the feeling of ocean waves.

“I’m hoping we can get this into production when the next game consoles come out in a couple of years,” says William Provancher, an associate professor of mechanical engineering who is in Vancouver, British Columbia, demonstrating the new game controller with his students March 5-7.

Samsung Announces EyeCAN Pointing Device for Disabled

Samsung announced EyeCAN, a pointing device (mouse-replacement) for people that are physically-handicapped. The device is a glasses-mounted solution that precisely tracks eye movements, allowing the user to move the mouse pointer accurately. The user needn't use a single muscle to click on anything that they see on their computer screen. Samsung announced the EyeCAN today as a working-prototype, with plans to start selling it to the general public later this year, priced at roughly 50,000 Won (US $44).

Source: Akihabara News

PowerColor HD 7970 Vortex Graphics Card Pictured

PowerColor is designing a non-reference Radeon HD 7970 graphics card, complete with its own PCB and cooler designs. For the cooler, PowerColor is designing an updated version of its Vortex II cooler featured on some of its older high-end graphics cards based on Radeon HD 6900 series GPUs. The cooler design is your typical aluminum fin-stack heatsink to which heat is fed by four 8 mm thick nickel-plated copper heat pipes. Ventilation is handled by two 80 mm fans, the frames of these fans are threaded and can be twisted to adjust the distance between the fan and the heatsink, adjusting its air-flow.

PowerColor also has a custom-design PCB to go with it, only the prototype pictured has no Tahiti GPU sitting on it, but PowerColor at least has a board design of its own at hand. The PCB draws power from two 8-pin PCIe power connectors, a CHIL-made controller handles voltage regulation. The VRM consists of a 9+1 phase design with a few other miscellaneous power domains. Those chokes appear to be slightly more cost-effective compared to the CPL-made ones featured on AMD's reference PCB. IR directFETs are replaced by cost-effective yet durable DrMOS chips.

Intel's Dodgy Ivy Bridge DX11 Demo: That Ultrabook Tested

Yesterday, we reported on Intel's embarrassing gaffe at demonstrating racing game F1 1 2011 running on a prototype ultrabook with an Ivy Bridge processor, where it was really just a video. Since then, AnandTech has seen that game play on an Ivy Bridge notebook just fine, but the best proof has come now, where they got hold of the actual ultrabook at the centre of the controversy and tested it with that game. The result? It works just fine, like we suspected. It looks like Intel just need a little PR makeover, is all. Video proof follows.
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