News Posts matching "web-browser"

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NVIDIA Adds Five New Features to GeForce Experience

NVIDIA added five new features to its GeForce Experience suite, that helps PC gamers get the most out of their GeForce hardware. It begins with a new in-game overlay, which works much like the Steam overlay, giving you access to cool new streaming, recording, and screengrabbing features. Next up, is the new Broadcast feature, which lets you instantly stream your gameplay to Twitch and YouTube, at 1080p 60 FPS. Recording gameplay is as easy as bringing up the overlay and clicking a button.

GameStream co-op, which was teased recently, lets you stream your game across to a buddy over the Internet, who can take over your game in their web-browser, and get you through the level you're stuck in (you need at least a 7 Mbps Internet connection on both ends for this to work). Lastly, in-home GameStream (which lets you stream your game to your living room TV), can now stream in glorious 4K Ultra HD, at 60 FPS, and with 5.1-channel audio. The "instant replay" feature lets you play back the past defined time period of gameplay as video. The new features go live with the GeForce 358.50 drivers, if you don't see them, make GeForce Experience "check for updates."

Microsoft to Rebrand Internet Explorer

Despite some genuine increases in performance and reliability, Microsoft Internet Explorer (MSIE) is turning into a relic. Once an unbeatable web-browser that attracted anti-competition lawsuits the world over, its market-share (usage) has dropped below 10 percent, according to W3Schools. With Windows 10, Microsoft plans to completely rebrand the bundled web-browser.

Codenamed "Project Spartan," the browser will feature a new UI, and a different branding from MSIE. It will also shed useless code, and will have a smaller memory footprint, much in the same way Firefox was a toned, peppy rebrand of Mozilla/Netscape Navigator. You could even expect a new icon. Microsoft could undertake a massive marketing campaign for the new browser, of a scale similar to Google's, for its Chrome browser. Microsoft could even delink the browser from Windows Update, to facilitate faster security and bug fixes. The browser could debut with beta releases of Windows 10, and its first stable version could come out with Windows 10 RTM.Source: PC World

Valve Announces Steam OS

People looking forward to the big "Steambox" announcement were met by an anticlimax. Valve announced its own operating system for PC gamers, which turns any PC into a "Steambox." Simply named Steam OS, the operating system is a highly modified Debian Linux stripped to bare, with all its non-essentials tossed out, and proprietary multimedia CODECs added, along with fonts, runtime environments, and in-built drivers for popular GPU, sound card, and gaming-peripheral brands. In essence, there's everything in the operating system for PC gamers, and then some.

Steam diversified from distributing PC games to non-gaming PC software, and Valve plans to take that further by doing groundwork for its very own living room content-delivery platform to compete with the likes of Xbox One. Since Steam OS can be deployed onto x86-based PCs as tiny as an Intel NUC, it stands more than a half chance. Its baby-steps are taken with In-home Streaming, a feature that lets you stream content off a PC or Mac in your house. You can share games in your account with others in your family, and close friends, using the recently-announced Family Sharing feature. You get content-blocking features and restricted-accounts. You also get media-player software that lets you organize and play back music and videos in most open- and proprietary formats. You should be able to install popular web-browsers like Google Chrome. Steam OS is competitively priced against Windows 8.1 and OS X 10.9, at $0. Did we tell you that some of its icons look like companion cubes? Just kidding.

QNAP Partners with TappIn to Offer Unique Mobile File Access and Sharing Solution

QNAP Systems, Inc. announced today a partnership with TappIn, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of GlobalSCAPE, a leading innovator of secure information exchange solutions for businesses and consumers. TappIn by GlobalSCAPE's secure content mobility solution will be available to QNAP's customers using the storage vendor's popular NAS devices. Tapp In provides a secure, integrated service for customers to receive on-the-go access to digital contents stored on a QNAP Turbo NAS device from any web-browser, tablet, or smartphone, including Apple iOS, Google Android, Windows Phone 7, and Kindle Fire. QNAP customers simply register for TappIn and begin accessing their contents on any Turbo NAS device via a TappIn web application or mobile apps.

According to new research from International Data Corporation (IDC), the volume of digital information may balloon from 2.7 zettabytes this year -- the equivalent of filling 2.7 billion of Apple Inc.'s priciest desktop iMacs to capacity -- to 8 zettabytes by 2015. The explosion of digital content is paralleled by the proliferation of devices on which people can access it. As this market's demand continues to increase, QNAP's integration of TappIn by GlobalSCAPE into its NAS devices will provide a solution for its customers that allows comprehensive local storage, and enables simple and secure content mobility, helping QNAP to continue its trend as one of the top providers of NAS and unified storage devices in the industry.

Mozilla Firefox To Pack H.264 Support

It looks like Mozilla has given in to the pressure of incorporating H.264 CODEC into its Firefox web-browser, and could incorporate it in future versions of the browser. The CODEC allows online videos utilizing H.264 format to run. Mozilla has been avoiding H.264 support since it is proprietary, riddled with patents, and requires Mozilla to purchase a license for millions of Dollars from MPEG-LA.

Mozilla has been trying to push for standards alternative to H.264, such as WebM, and the VP8 format. It had originally planned its push for an H.264-free web at a time when it was a much stronger player in the web-browser market, which now sees a strong presence of Google Chrome, which already features H.264. H.264 is superior to its alternatives, in being lighter on the system's resources (hence, lighter on the battery).

Sources: Engadget, The Inquirer

Elecom Unveils Wireless Mouse With Up To 3.5 Years Battery Life

Japanese company Elecom unveiled the M-IR03DR wireless optical mouse series, that boasts of battery life up to 3.5 years with typical usage (office). The mouse makes use of low-power electronics to achieve that. The mouse uses an infrared optical sensor for tracking, with resolution settings of 1,600 and 800 dpi. Oriented for right-handed users, the mouse has five buttons, with the two buttons on the side working as back and forward buttons in web-browsers.

The mouse communicates to the host over 2.4 GHz radio band, and is compliant with VCCI CLASS B regulations to provide less interference to other devices operating in this band. Measuring 15 x 18 x 5.0 mm, the mouse weighs 82 g without batteries. It requires two AA-size batteries. It is available in three color options: black (M-IR03DRBK), silver (M-IR03DRSV0), and white (M-IR03DRRD). It is priced at 5,145 JPY (US $64.5).

Source: Hermitage Akihabara

MSIE 6 Usage Drops Below 1% in The US, Microsoft Celebrates

With three successors and design limitations posing as hurdles for security updates, Microsoft's iconic Internet Explorer 6 (MSIE 6) web-browser had been deemed a security vulnerability for anyone using it, and Microsoft undertook a campaign to get the world to update their MSIE to the latest MSIE 9. With December 2011 web-browser usage statistics out by several sources, the usage of MSIE 6 in the United States dropped below the 1% mark, causing Microsoft claim that the United States bid goodbye to MSIE 6. The MSIE team celebrated this development with a ceremonious cake and a little afterhours party.

MSIE 6 now makes up 0.9% of the US web-browser market. Czech Republic, Portugal, The Philippines, Ukraine and Mexico, are the other countries where MSIE 6 holds under 1% of the market. The browser is used by 25% of Chinese internet users (a huge number). Interestingly, South Korea, which has some of the fastest consumer ISP networks in the world, has 7.2% usage. 5.9% of Japanese netizens are still stuck to the decade-old browser, and so are 5.4% Indian users. Overall, MSIE 6 still holds 7.7% of the global web-browser market-share, which is respectable, considering it's greater than those of Apple Safari (Mac/PC), and Opera, and disturbing, considering it is a very vulnerable piece of software unless it's used for closed VPN intranets. More stats can be found here.

Source: Windows Team Blog

Google Chrome will Overtake Internet Explorer in 2012: StatCounter

After overtaking Mozilla Firefox in terms of web-browser market-share in December 2011, Google Chrome has its eyes trained on Microsoft Internet Explorer (MSIE), still the most popular web-browser in use today. According to the most recent StatCounter figures, at the rate at which Google Chrome's market-share is growing, it will overtake that of MSIE in 2012. It will do that as early as in June-July. Interestingly, Google Chrome is the youngest web-browser among its competitors, launched in Q4 2008, but has surpassed the market shares of much older competitors in a matter of months. Apart from stats, Google's web-advertising prowess makes Chrome's MSIE overtake in June-July seem realistic.

Source: Pocket-lint

Mozilla a Partner, Not Competitor: Google Chrome Engineer

In what could be a sign of improving ties between Google and Mozilla, Peter Kasting, engineer in the Google Chrome web-browser development team referred to Mozilla as a partner, and not a competitor. The statement came in context of the recently-renewed search engine deal between the two, where Google pays Mozilla for setting Google as its primary search engine, both on its browser search bar, and its Firefox start page. Kasting also went to the extant of stating that Chrome isn't necessarily a profit-seeking operation by Google.

Kasting stated: "People never seem to understand why Google builds Chrome no matter how many times I try to pound it into their heads. It's very simple: the primary goal of Chrome is to make the web advance as much and as quickly as possible. It's completely irrelevant to this goal whether Chrome actually gains tons of users or whether instead the web advances because the other browser vendors step up their game and produce far better browsers. Either way the web gets better. Job done."

NSS Labs Accuses Google of Undertaking Campaign to Knock Firefox Off The Market

Google Chrome is a fast and functional web browser. Let's get that out of the way first. But one of the main reasons a largely successful corporation put resources into developing a web-browser into a market that isn't very profitable, is cost-cutting. Since it's inception, the search bar Mozilla Firefox came with, has Google as its default search provider. Every time people search using that search bar in Firefox, Mozilla Foundation makes money. It is estimated that these Google searches amount to a majority of Mozilla's revenue, as Google pays it as much as 50 million dollars an year. Google Chrome, despite its genuine merits, is a cost-cutting operation. The more people use it over Firefox, the less Google has to pay Mozilla.

Web security researchers have historically rated Google Chrome has having the worst security and privacy compared to Firefox, and Internet Explorer (read this, and here), but the most recent research by Denver-based security consultancy Accuvant claimed that Google Chrome has the best security and privacy features, while Mozilla Firefox has the worst. Want to hear the kicker? That research by Accuvant was funded by Google. Want to hear another one? A similar research firm that has historically done vendor-funded research, NSS Labs, voiced strong objections to Accuvant's research, calling it an all-out attempt to malign Mozilla Firefox.

Google Chrome Overtakes Mozilla Firefox in Browser Market-share: StatCounter

According to the latest data sourced by StatCounter for the month of November 2011, Google Chrome has overtaken Mozilla Firefox in terms of web-browser software market-share. The GlobalStats data provides a worldwide picture, and not just specific to a region. According to the data, Chrome took 25.69% of the worldwide market (up from 4.66% in November 2009) compared to Firefox's 25.23%.

Microsoft's Internet Explorer still maintains a strong lead globally with 40.63%. Google Chrome began in mid-2008 as an experimental minimalist UI web-browser based on the Chromium project, it is a multi-process tabbed web browser based on Apple Webkit and several other pieces of free, licensed, and open-source technologies. Its market share is on the rise. The stats can be accessed here.

Firefox in Warp Zone, Updated to Version 7.0

A little over a month after releasing Firefox 6.0, and quickly following it up with two minor updates (6.0.1 and 6.0.2), Mozilla released its next "major" version, Firefox 7.0 into the release channel. It is now clear that Mozilla Firefox is playing catch-up with other popular web-browsers in some sort of a version number game. The three year old Google Chrome is already into version 14, with version 16 already in the dev channel.

While Firefox users will not be in for a different user interface (it's bad to drastically change it from time to time), Firefox 7 does seem to come with several under-the-hood changes. To begin with, the Windows version features a brand-new rendering back-end that speeds up Canvas, a tweaked Sync system that instantly syncs changes to bookmarks and saved passwords, support for text-overflow: ellipsis, compliance with the Web Timing specification, WebSocket protocol updated from version 7 to 8, and improved support for MathML. The only UI change is that the protocol of the page loaded is hidden. The full URL will be copied when you copy the address in the bar. Firefox 7 is launched for all platforms it's available in: Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android.
DOWNLOAD: Mozilla Firefox 7

Adobe Flash Player 11, AIR 3 Out in Early October

In early October, content technology major Adobe will release Flash Player 11, the next major release of the Adobe Flash client-end software. The new browser plugin promises a platform that allows 1,000 times faster 2D/3D rendering performance over Flash Player 10, using full hardware-acceleration. Right here we see Adobe waking up to the HTML5 threat. Angry Birds on Google Chrome, anyone? The next key area addressed by Flash Player 11, is full native 64-bit (x86-64) web-browser support. This move will potentially cause the long-overdue decline of 32-bit web-browsers on 64-bit operating systems, since you already have HTML5 and Java on 64-bit browsers.

Next up, Adobe will pack its AIR platform, a Flash-based application runtime environment that uses the "superior user-interface" plank. AIR 3, which accompanies Flash Player 11, will support native extensions, that gives AIR applications added functionality. These include hardware capabilities including access to device data, vibration control, magnetometers, light sensors, dual screens, near field communications (NFC) and more. You know what adobe is getting at, future portable devices that are extremely powerful and functional.

Mozilla Foundation Develops its Own Operating System

One of the biggest promoters of open source software, and the group behind one of the most popular web-browsers, Mozilla Foundation, has undertaken a project of developing a mobile operating system referred to as "B2G" or Boot to Gecko, with the catchphrase "booting to the web". We expect it to be functionally modeled somewhere between Google's Android and Chrome operating systems. Essentially it is an operating system that boots to the web-browser that can get you browsing the web directly, or use cloud-based application software.

B2G might target a variety of devices ranging from smartphones to tablets and netbooks. Smartphone essentials such as telephony, SMS, camera, Bluetooth, NFC (near-field communication) and USB, will work with the browser via new web APIs. Applications can be cloud-based widgets, or software that uses open developer environments. Basic applications will be functionally identical to many of the apps that ship with Android or even Apple iOS. What's more, B2G's kernel and booting substrate will be designed to be 100% compatible with today's Android-compatible devices such as phones and tablets, so manufacturers don't have to redesign anything on their side. At this stage the project is still in its infancy, and is seeking community participation, the same participation that made Firefox and Thunderbird applications with the quality of proprietary software.Source: MozillaWiki

Mozilla Expedites Firefox Development Cycle, New Release Tomorrow

There must be some latent value in version number. Close to 3 years old, Google Chrome is already at version 14 in its developer channel. The grand old man of web-browsers, Microsoft Internet Explorer (MSIE), which has a much slower release cycle, is at version 9. The second oldest browser in production, Opera, is at version 11. That leaves Mozilla Firefox, which is relatively newer to the market, but crawled its way past generations by versions 1.0x or 0.5x, with 0.0.1x in near-monthly minor updates. With the browser-wars hotting up as Google Chrome maintains its breakneck development cycle and MSIE regained competitiveness with version 9, Mozilla Firefox is ceding market-share. Perhaps this is pushing Mozilla to speed up its update cycle.

In Mozilla's case, this seems more like an version number inflation, because Firefox 4 was released just this March, and has only had one minor update since (4.0.1). The group is already looking to release the next "big release", Firefox 5, on 21 June, 2011. Its file locations on Mozilla's FTP are already leaked. Unlike with older major releases where each comes with a changed user interface, layout, or at least new icons; Firefox 5 user interface is identical to that of Firefox 4. The changes here are a faster webpage rendering engine, improved HTML5 support, the ability to pin bookmarked webpages to the Windows Taskbar a-là MSIE 9, and a built-in Adobe PDF reader a-là Chrome.

DOWNLOAD: Mozilla Firefox 5 (Win32)Source: The Tech Journal

Firefox 4 Clocks Over Six Million Downloads in First 24 Hours

Released to the web, Mozilla Firefox 4 has been downloaded over 6 million times in 24 hours since its launch. The figure is three times greater than that of Microsoft Internet Explorer 9, which clocked about 2 million downloads in its first 24 hours since launch. Firefox 4 is the latest version of the popular open-source web-browser software, it introduced radical design changes to its user interface, and embraced a faster GPU-accelerated rendering engine. Firefox 4 can be downloaded from here.

Mozilla Firefox 4 Web-Browser Released

Mozilla Corporation unveiled the "latest and greatest" version of its popular web-browser, Mozilla Firefox 4. With this release, the open-source browser achieves all essential features common with the latest generation of web-browsers that include Google Chrome 10+ and Microsoft Internet Explorer 9, which are: HTML5 support, and GPU-accelerated webpage drawing. Apart from being a lot faster than Firefox 3.6, the new browser sports a completely new user interface that shifts tabs to the titlebar, shifts menus to a "Firefox" button, and consolidates the address bar, search bar, and navigation buttons into a single line, which it refers to as the "Awesome Bar". Apart from a new bookmark manager, Firefox lets you group tabs to streamline multitasking on the browser. Mozilla Firefox 4 will be available to a variety of platforms.

DOWNLOAD: Mozilla Firefox 4

Mozilla Firefox 4 Launch Date is March 22

After the much hyped Internet Explorer 9 launch, it's time for the open-source Firefox to get its facelift. Mozilla has decided to launch the stable version of Mozilla Firefox 4 on the 22nd of March. Firefox 4 is a single-process web-browser that runs plugins in separate container processes. It will be up to date with the latest in web standards, including HTML5, will feature a much faster Javascript engine, and will use GPU hardware acceleration to speed up rendering. March 22 is turning out to be quite a day for the tech sphere, with NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 590 graphics accelerator, and EA/Crytek's self-proclaimed blockbuster game release, Crysis 2, also releasing on the same day.

Windows Internet Explorer 9 Released

Microsoft released Internet Explorer 9, in its stable RTM form, nearly an year after it first released "Platform Previews", followed by Betas and Release Candidates. With its latest release, Microsoft's still popular web-browser underwent a major overhaul in terms of features and browser-engine. The new browser is backed by a faster Javascript engine, a faster rendering engine that makes use of GPU hardware acceleration for drawing, and redesigned user interface elements that make day to day web browsing experience snappier.

With Internet Explorer 9, Microsoft also took a bold step in not supporting Windows XP, which still holds a large chunk of the operating system market share, the new browser only supports Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows 2008/2008-R2 series operating systems. The user interface is far more minimalistic, uses simple icons, the status and menu bars are hidden by default, with tooltips doing the job of a status bar, and the browser continues to support a large number of ActiveX components. The browser also underwent a security overhaul. For 64-bit versions of Windows, the installer also packs a 64-bit version of the browser. Oracle already has a stable 64-bit Java ActiveX plugin, while Adobe Labs has a beta 64-bit Flash player for Windows, two big steps in porting the web-browser to x86-64.

DOWNLOAD: Microsoft Windows Internet Explorer 9

Acer's New ''Web Surf Station'' is Between Monitor and All-in-One in Functionality

Acer made the PC monitor a little smarter by giving it PC functionality, without being a PC. The new DX241H "Web Surf Station" is a 24-inch full-HD monitor that has an in-built web-browser based on Google Chrome, and DLNA-based media player, that give users the ability to surf the web and access their media collection, without needing a PC. The monitor comes with a "Web Surf Station" remote that gives media controls, and a slide-out QWERTY keypad. The monitor can connect to the internet over wired Ethernet, a wireless network adapter can also be plugged in to the monitor's USB 2.0 ports. The monitor uses these USB 2.0 ports to access USB flash drives, external hard drives, and drive enclosures, or pretty much any media that uses the USB Mass Storage framework. A multi-format card reader is also included.

As a monitor, the DX241H is full-HD (1920 x 1080 pixels resolution), and uses a TN panel. It features 80,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio, 300 cd/m² brightness, fast 2 ms response time, and display inputs that include D-Sub and HDMI. It is available for pre-order in Europe, priced at €299.

Source: TechConnect Magazine

Internet Explorer 9 Final Launches on the 14th

After subjecting itself to the dark ages as Mozilla Firefox, and later Google Chrome started eating into its market-share, Microsoft's Internet Explorer team released version 9 of its [then] iconic browser, which actually kept up with current standards in terms of speed, features, and functionality. Internet Explorer 9 stable will be released to web on March 14, 2011.

MSIE 9 made its first public release in September 2010, in the form of a functional beta, and was fed by the occasional stability updates. It later assumed the form of the first Release Candidate in early February 2011, with a slightly tweaked user-interface. Once it achieves a stable build status, it will be updated regularly under Microsoft's cumulative security updates. Internet Explorer 9 is an "omnibox"-styled, tabbed, multi-process web-browser. Each tab and running ActiveX plugin runs in its own process. The browser is up to date in terms of standards including HTML5, packs a fast Javascript engine, and uses GPU hardware acceleration to draw web-page contents.Source: Windows Team Blog

Microsoft Rolled Out First Public Beta of Internet Explorer 9

Microsoft released the first public beta of its sceptically-anticipated web-browser, the Windows Internet Explorer 9 (or IE9). Sceptical, because the previous two versions did not really shine compared to other web-browsers in performance, and anticipated, because it promised revolutionary changes in the rendering engine and the way it works. IE9 is one of the first browsers that uses GPU (graphics processors) for rendering almost every page element, including text and layout. It features a new Javascript engine codenamed "Chakra" that has higher JS performance, and supports HTML5 web standards. The UI itself looks very lean and modelled along the lines of Google Chrome, with just the bare-essential controls, and menus. The address bar doubles up as a search bar. There are loads of functionality improvements, including detachable tabs, Windows Aero Snap tabs, and the ability to pin favourite websites to the Windows 7 taskbar. A performance manager monitors plugins and advices you to disable those which are slowing down the browser.

DOWNLOAD: Microsoft Windows Internet Explorer 9 beta

Please note, the software works only on Windows Vista and Windows 7.

Mozilla Firefox Turns Five

Everyone who is more than familiar with the term 'the Internet', may have come across, or has even been affected by Mozilla Firefox, one of the most popular web-browser software. The cross-platform, open-source web-browser was born out of the Mozilla project, after practical, and minimalist simplification of the user interface. This, coupled with good performance for the stature of an Internet Explorer alternative, being safer against spyware, popups, and malicious addon software, quickly became popular, and part of the web-centric pop-culture.

Firefox has also helped shape several things in the connected IT industry. It replenished the credibility of open-source model of software development, and forced content providers to adhere to open-standards. Firefox today turns five years old, which is 'a long time on the Internet', as its team puts it. The SpreadFirefox community have rolled out a portal celebrating the event, it can be found here.

Source: Mozilla

Safari 4 Beta Tested, Gives IE7 a Sound Thrashing at JavaScript Performance

There is a valid reason behind why Safari is growing in browser market-share, apart from the fact that iPhone carries it: it is arguably the fastest browser there is. The fourth beta version that surfaced earlier this week went a few notches ahead of Firefox (Minefield) 3.2a1 and Google Chrome in a review conducted by CNet, to take the top-sport for the fastest web-browser. Internet Explorer (IE) versions 7 and 8, Opera 9.6, Firefox 3, Chrome, Firefox(Minefield) 3.1 Alpha 1 and Safari 4 were put through JavaScript tests using the SunSpider suite. The PC was equipped with a Core 2 Duo processor running at 2.10 GHz. Safari 4 beta gave IE 7 a sound thrashing at the test, emerging 42 times faster. The performance difference between the two were so vast that the reviewers had to prepare a seperate graph without IE 7 so there could be more resolution in the charts showing the differences between the rest of the contendors. Then again, one must take into account the fact that Chrome and Firefox (Minefield) 3.2 weren't all that behind Safari 4 beta, only a few notches. The scores are denoted by render time in terms of milliseconds. Lesser the better. The scores stand at:
  • Safari 4 (Total time: 910 ms)
  • Mozilla Minefield 3.2a1 (1,136 ms)
  • Google Chrome (1,177 ms)
  • Firefox 3 (3,250 ms)
  • Opera 9.6 (4,076 ms)
  • Internet Explorer 8 (5,839 ms)
  • Internet Explorer 7 (39,026 ms)

Source: CNET

Mozilla Firefox Updated to 3.0.6

Mozilla added its regular incremental update to the Firefox web-browser. With this release, the group fixed many bugs found with its previous version 3.0.5, which don't necessarily translate into security flaws. As many as seven critical thru mild security vulnerabilities were fixed, that includes a crash with memory corruption issue, and extraction of data using SessionStore files. The list of security fixes addressed can be found here. The release also fixes several bugs as listed in the updated bug list. The release also improves the ability of scripted commands to work properly with plugins, one of the major bugs fixed. Fore more information, refer to the release notes page for version 3.0.6. Firefox can be downloaded from the server closest to you, from the Firefox homepage. Existing users would be updated automatically.
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