Reviews

OCZ's Trion 150 is one of the most affordable SSDs on the market today, with only 27 cents per gigabyte. Performance has also been improved significantly over the Trion 100, which makes the Trion 150 an excellent candidate for a low-cost system upgrade to boost performance.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.9
Crucial's BX200 SSD comes at an incredible price point Micron's new triple-layer-cell (TLC) flash chips make possible. In our testing, the drive delivers decent performance, which, combined with pricing, results in a leading price/performance position for the BX200.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.9
The Toshiba HK3R2 is an entry-level enterprise SSD that has been built around Toshiba's own controller and NAND chips. With its 960 GB capacity, it offers plenty of storage for all business applications, and our MySQL database testing reveals excellent performance in read-heavy scenarios.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.8
OCZ's new Trion 100 SSD is built around brand-new TLC NAND chips from Toshiba, using a Toshiba TC58 controller. Thanks to TLC technology, the drive competes with Crucial BX100 in pricing, which is less than 40 cents per gigabyte.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.0
Kingston's new HyperX Savage 240 GB is built around a Phison controller using 19 nanometer flash chips. With a price of only $120 for the 240 GB version, it sits right on the magic $0.50-per-GB mark.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.4
Intel's new 750 Series SSD is a technological marvel. It is built on an 18-channel controller using a PCI-Express x4 3.0 interface with the NVMe protocol. This provides transfer rates of well over 1 GB/s, which clearly impresses. With a price of $1 per GB, the drive is also not prohibitively expensive.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.0
OCZ's new Vector 180 adds power stability monitoring capability, which helps protect the drive's data in case of a power outage. OCZ has also announced a new SSD software suite, which is more user friendly and comes with additional features. The OCZ Vector 180 240 GB retails at $150.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.0
Crucial's new BX100 SSD is a cost-optimized solid state drive that can be had for an ultra affordable price. Built around a Silicon Motion controller, it delivers fast, consistent performance that's just within 1% of the Crucial MX100.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.7
Crucial's new MX200 SSD can utilize portions of its flash capacity in super-fast SLC mode, which makes it the fastest SSD we ever tested. Once the disk gets fuller, the drive automagically switches to MLC mode, block-by-block, all in the background, so you can maximize its disk-space usage.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.4
Crucial's new MX100 SSD is super affordable, yet provides excellent performance that can easily compete with the big boys. It uses brand-new 16 nanometer flash chips from Micron, paired with a proven Marvell controller. Hands down the best SSD you can get!
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.8
Today, AMD enters the SSD market with their Radeon R7 SSD, which is built using OCZ technology. Using a Barefoot 3 controller and Toshiba 19 nanometer flash chips, the drive is designed for consumers and gamers alike. AMD has also extended the warranty of their R7 SSD to four years.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.0
Angelbird is a young solid-state drive manufacturer from Austria. Their new SSD, wrk, is built on the Silicon Motion SM2246 controller which delivers good real-life performance in our testing. While a price of $300 for 512 GB won't shock the market these days, the drive is affordable overall.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.5
Toshiba's new HG6 Series is an incremental update over the HG5d Series and claims the performance throne in our new real-life SSD benchmarking suite. Toshiba's latest model is also cheaper than the predecessor, which even makes it an excellent choice for value-oriented buyers.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.6
Crucial's new M550 SSD is based on an updated version of the Marvell controller, which means it no longer uses overprovisioning: you get to use the whole capacity. In our real-life testing we also see a slight performance improvement, which is great, especially considering the M550's competitive pricing.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.0
OCZ's new Vector 150 is a direct replacement for the Vector using the same Indilinx controller. The only major change is that flash chips from Toshiba instead of Micron are used.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.6
The Vertex 450 is OCZ's replacement for their Vertex 4 and uses OCZ's own in-house Indilinx Barefoot controller. In our testing, we see performance that matches the Vertex 4, at a lower price. The included TrueImage HD software makes migration easier than before, especially for less experienced users.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.7
Corsair's new Force LS SSD is a value-oriented alternative to SandForce drives. The solid-state disk is based on a Phison flash controller with Toshiba 19 nm flash and delivers quite decent performance.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.7
Plextor's M5 Pro is the company's current flagship SSD, based on a Marvell flash controller and Toshiba 19 nm NAND flash. In our testing, we see solid results that can easily compete with other high-end drives. The included five year warranty is another bonus.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.9
Seagate is trying to establish a strong presence in the SSD market using their new 600 and 600 Pro SSDs, which are based on a Link-A-Media controller. Clocking in at $400 for the 480 GB version, our testing shows good price/performance, at affordable storage cost.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.3
We recently tested the 512 GB version of Toshiba's latest SSD with 19 nm flash chips and a rebranded Marvell controller. Today, we are looking at the 256 GB version to investigate whether the smaller capacity reduces performance, or if it too manages to claim the performance throne.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.4
Crucial's new M500 SSD is built on an upgraded Marvell flash controller with new 20 nanometer 128 Gbit die MLC flash. This combination makes for a very affordable drive that also provides excellent performance in both synthetic and real-life performance testing.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.4
The Samsung 840 SSD is the first solid-state drive using TLC flash technology, which promises higher data density for a lower overall cost. Our testing sees decent performance that turns into "outstanding" when taking into account performance per dollar and price per GB.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.0
Toshiba recently released new solid-state drives based on their own 19 nm flash chips and a rebranded Marvell controller. In our testing, we see amazing real-life performance results that easily beat drives from other well-known vendors, like Samsung, Corsair, and OCZ.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.4
Kingston's HyperX 3K SSD is positioned at a more affordable price level than its blue non-3K sibling. Our performance testing reveals surprising numbers: the drive actually ends up being faster than the regular HyperX.
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:9.2
The Mushkin Chronos 240 GB comes at an amazing price of just $165, which makes it one of the most affordable drives out there if you want to get going with SSDs. But does such a value oriented SSD offer the performance you need?
Posted:
Author:W1zzard
In:SSD
Score:8.3