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Intel CEO Outlines New Computing Opportunities with China Technology Ecosystem

As the computing industry landscape undergoes rapid transformation, Intel Corporation CEO Brian Krzanich today outlined the company's plans to build upon its nearly 30-year history in China, and collaborate with the growing technology ecosystem, particularly in Shenzhen, to accelerate new innovation and reshape the computing industry.

During his keynote, Krzanich discussed how Intel and the Shenzhen technology ecosystem can re-ignite growth - both locally and globally - and deliver differentiated computing products and experiences, spanning multiple market segments, operating systems and price points. Underscoring this point, he announced the establishment of an Intel Smart Device Innovation Center in Shenzhen and a US$100 million Intel Capital China Smart Device Innovation Fund.

Intel "Fultondale" and "Pleasantdale" SSDs Not Very Pleasant with Thermals

As SSDs play catch-up with HDDs on the capacity front, the focus will shift to NAND flash memory designers increasing transistor densities using newer silicon fabrication technologies. In the absence of that, SSD designers will have to cram more number of NAND flash chips to achieve desired high capacities. That throws up two key issues with having too many chips in one place - heat and power. Intel is gearing up to deal with heat on its upcoming "Fultondale" and "Pleasantdale" SSDs for data-centers. Leaked company documents seen by VR-Zone reveal renders of what Intel expects the drives to look like.

Built in the 3.5-inch form-factor the drives are built almost entirely of chunky metal, with a retractable top lid, and its body. The body doubles up as heatsink, it features metal ridges which dissipate heat drawn from the NAND flash chips of the SSD to the air. Internally, the drive will feature at least two PCBs, one which holds the controller, cache RAM (if any), and some NAND flash chips; while the other holds NAND flash chips entirely. How hot can things get? According to the source, the drive could draw as much as 25W of power. That could amount to enough heat to warrant a passive heatsink. Intel is expected to unveil the two drives at IDF Beijing, slated for Q4-2014.

Source: VR-Zone

Fresco Logic Demonstrates First SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps (USB 3.1) Data Transfer

Fresco Logic, a global fabless semiconductor company that develops and markets advanced connectivity solutions, demonstrated SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps (USB 3.1) data transfer on its hardware development platform at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF). This demonstration marks the first public showing of a working SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps host and mass storage device transferring data. USB is the most successful standard in the history of computing, and in its newest revision, USB 3.1, the data transfer rate jumps to 10 Gb/s on a bi-directional link, more than double the effective bandwidth of the already fast SuperSpeed USB (USB 3.0) standard.

"The USB-IF is pleased to see Fresco Logic develop early implementations that showcase key features supported by the USB 3.1 specification," said Jeff Ravencraft, USB-IF President & COO. "The Fresco Logic demonstration shows a significant performance increase that devices and hosts will support based on the USB 3.1 specification, and the demo shows the value that this performance increase brings to consumers."

G.Skill Showcases DDR4 System Memory and Live Demo of DDR3-3000 at IDF

G.SKILL International Co. Ltd., the world's leading designer and manufacturer of extreme performance memory, proudly displays several engineering sample DDR4 modules at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF). The next generation of DDR memory is still under development, and G.SKILL is working to push the new technology to its limits in the future. G.SKILL also features a live demo of DDR3 3000MHz 32GB (8x4GB) with the Intel Core i7-4960X CPU and ASUS X79-Deluxe motherboard. Driving the new Ivy Bridge-E processor to new limits, G.SKILL looks forward to offer a wide range of high performance memory kits on the Intel X79 platform.
A video presentation follows.

PROMISE to Exhibit Thunderbolt 2 Technology with Pegasus2 Series at IDF 2013

PROMISE Technology, Inc. announced today that they will be demonstrating at Intel's Developer Forum (IDF) the next generation Pegasus2 Series with Thunderbolt 2 Technology. PROMISE shipped the world's first storage solutions with the original Thunderbolt technology and continues its track-record as a leading innovator of storage solutions for the rich media space with the new Pegasus2 Series.

Thunderbolt technology is an enormous enabler for video with its exceptional performance and bandwidth, and Thunderbolt 2 further embraces the growing 4K applications in media and entertainment, mobility and computing. Running bi-directionally at 20 Gbps, double the bandwidth of Thunderbolt, Thunderbolt 2 is a breakthrough for video creators as it enables simultaneous 4K video file transfer and display. The advancement in bandwidth will enable professionals to edit and view live 4K streams while backing up the same file to a Pegasus2 system, all with the same cables and connectors as the previous generation.

New Intel CEO Outlines Product Plans, Future of Computing Vision at IDF 2013

From data centers to ultra-mobile devices such as tablets, phones and wearables, computing segments are undergoing exciting and even game-changing transitions, said new Intel CEO Brian Krzanich during today's opening session of the Intel Developer Forum. Krzanich laid out Intel's vision and described how Intel is addressing each dynamic market segment - such as accelerating Intel's progress in ultra-mobile devices - with new products over the next year and beyond, including a new, lower-power product family.

Krzanich said Intel plans to leave no segment untapped. "Innovation and industry transformation are happening more rapidly than ever before, which play to Intel's strengths. We have the manufacturing technology leadership and architectural tools in place to push further into lower power regimes. We plan to shape and lead in all areas of computing."
Image courtesy of Engadget

ADATA Launches New Generation DDR4 DRAM Modules

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules and NAND Flash storage application products, announced today that the company's new generation DDR4 SDRAM modules will be on display at the Intel Developer Forum 2013 (IDF13), held this year in San Francisco. Targeting server and render farm applications, the new DDR4 modules show that ADATA is once again at the front of the pack in providing new high-performance solutions to the enterprise market.

DDR4 SDRAM stands for double data rate fourth generation synchronous dynamic random-access memory, and its most notable features are faster clock frequencies and data transfer rates as compared to DDR3, as well as low power consumption. Running at just 1.2 volts, these new modules are expected to achieve transfer rates of 3.2Gbps, at frequencies as high as 2133MHz, far outstripping the capabilities of previous generations of DRAM. In large scale server applications, the advantages of DDR4 will lead to lower costs and greatly improved overall system performance. The new DDR4 SDRAM modules will be showcased along with the company's other premium memory solutions at booth number 554 at IDF13.

Wilocity and DisplayLink Demo World's First Wireless 4K Graphics and Video

Wilocity, a leading developer of 60 GHz multi-gigabit wireless chipsets, and DisplayLink, the leading provider of USB graphics technology, today announced the industry's first demonstration of WiGig-enabled 4K graphics and video. The demonstration features a Wilocity-powered WiGig integrated notebook and a WiGig docking station -- the latter also integrates the latest 4K capable chipset from DisplayLink -- connected to a 4K resolution monitor, which is more than four times higher resolution than 1080p full HD resolution.

The demonstration is being showcased September 10-12 at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco at the DisplayLink booth and in parallel at Wi-Fi Alliance industry events in Beijing, Seoul, Taiwan and Tokyo.

G.Skill to Showcase Next-Generation Memory at IDF

G.SKILL International Co. Ltd., the leading high-performance memory designer and manufacturer, announced to participate this year's Intel Developer Forum at San Francisco as part of Intel's memory community at booth no. 165, displaying maximum DDR3 memory frequency & capacity on the new Intel Core i7 processor family for socket LGA-2011 platform, also sharing plans for future technology such as DDR4. "As this is our first time attending IDF, we are very excited to show our high performance quad channel DDR3 memory and also announce our plans for DDR4," said Mark Yu, Technical Marketing at G.SKILL.

Intel to Demo SSD Overclocking at IDF 2013

It could soon become possible to overclock the controller and NAND flash of your SSD, if Intel has its way. The company is set to demonstrate how to overclock Intel-branded SSDs using its Xtreme Tuning Utility (XTU), at IDF 2013, which goes underway this September. The item on Intel's IDF itinerary marked "AIOS001" deals with seminars on overclocking Intel's next-generation HEDT (high-end desktop) platforms. X-bit Labs believes Intel could talk about SSD overclocking during that session.

Options to tweak SSDs were discovered when poking around the code of an unreleased XTU version. XTU is a unified software utility by Intel, which lets you tweak CPU, memory, and system cooling on systems running Intel Desktop Boards. Among the things end-users should be able to tweak, apart from the controller clock-speed, are the NAND flash bus-speed. Taking away interface overheads and other round-offs, 560 MB/s appears to be the practical maximum bandwidth SATA 6 Gb/s SSDs have been able to achieve. It could always be handy getting your SSD a few dozen more MB/s sequential speeds at the expense of stability.
Sources: MyCE, X-bit Labs

Intel Bay Trail-T Launching On September 11

Intel's updated Atom family, part of the new Bay Trail-T platform, will arrive on September 11. The new Bay Trail-T lineup includes four quad-core chips and will be part of two different series of chips. The four chips include the Z3770D, Z3770D, Z3740 and Z3740D. Here, the 'D' suffix bearing chips will be able to drive a maximum display resolution of 1920 x 1200, while the non-'D' chips will be able to drive 2560 x 1600 resolution panels. Additionally, the 'D' chips have support for 10.6 GB/s memory bandwidth, which is a much higher 17.1 GB/s for the non-'D' chips. Clock speeds for the 3770 series will max out at 2.4 GHz, while the 3740 series will be limited to 1.8 GHz. The GPU department will be handled by Intel HD Graphics. Expect more details to surface at IDF later this year.

Source: VR-Zone

Intel Core "Haswell" Easier to Overclock

At the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2013 event held in Beijing last week, the company ran two separate seminars related to "Haswell," one related to the micro-architecture itself, and the other overclocking it. The company detailed improvements to the ways in which you can overclock these chips, without necessarily having to shell out dough for the base clock multiplier unlocked "-K" parts.

To begin with, tweaking Core "Haswell" processors will be similar to tweaking Core "Sandy Bridge-E" high-end desktop (HEDT) platform. Naturally then, overclocking "non-K" parts will be similar to overclocking the Core i7-3820. The chips ship with a base clock speed of 100 MHz. As with "Ivy Bridge," not just CPU cores, but also certain uncore components rely on this frequency. Also, as with "Ivy Bridge," overclockers will be given 5 to 7 percent headroom for tweaking this frequency, but it doesn't end there.

Intel Announces 2nd Gen. Thunderbolt with Increased Bandwidth

At the ongoing Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2013 event in Beijing, Intel announced second-generation Thunderbolt specification. Pin and plug-compatible with existing Thunderbolt devices, the second-generation Thunderbolt doubles bandwidth over its predecessor, offering devices an enormous 20 Gb/s of bandwidth, four times that of USB 3.0 SuperSpeed. The bandwidth enables users the ability to transfer uncompressed 4K Ultra-HD video without causing display to lag.

To back the specification, Intel announced the "Falcon Ridge" line of Thunderbolt host controllers, mass production of which will commence by late-2013, going into 2014. In addition, the company launched two "Redwood Ridge" host controllers, DSL4510 and DSL4410. The two add DisplayPort 1.2 capability when connecting to native DP displays, improve power management, and reduce platform BOM cost.

IDF 2013 Transforming Computing Experiences from the Device to the Cloud

During her keynote at the Intel Developer Forum today in Beijing, Diane Bryant, senior vice president and general manager of Intel's Datacenter and Connected Systems Group, discussed how her company is helping users harness powerful new capabilities that will improve the lives of people by building smarter cities, healthier communities and thriving businesses.

Bryant unveiled details of upcoming technologies and products that show how Intel aims to transform the server, networking and storage capabilities of the datacenter. By addressing the full spectrum of workload demands and providing new levels of application optimized solutions for enterprise IT, technical computing and cloud service providers, unprecedented experiences can be delivered.

AMD Shows Off A10-5800K and FX-8350 Near IDF

It's traditional for AMD to camp outside an ongoing IDF event (at a nearby hotel suite), siphoning off a small portion of its visitors. In the backdrop of this year's IDF event in San Francisco, AMD showed off two of its upcoming flagship client processors, the socket FM2 A10-5800K "Trinity" APU, and socket AM3+ FX-8350 "Vishera" CPU. The two chips were shown running fully-loaded gaming PCs.

The FX-8350 was shown installed on a machine with ASUS Crosshair V Formula (-Z?) motherboard, liquid cooling, and Radeon HD 7970 graphics card. The chip was clocked at 5.00 GHz (4.80 GHz when the picture was taken), and running popular CPU-intensive benchmarks such as WPrime and Cinebench. The A10-5800K was shown running application demos, including a widget that displays real-time boost states of the processor and GPU cores.

Source: Hardware.fr

Intel "Rosepoint" Atom Combines x86 Cores with WiFi Transceiver

At IDF 2012, Intel showed off an experimental SoC codenamed "Rosepoint," targeted at low power mobile consumer devices. Built on the 32 nm process, the tiny chip combines a full-featured dual-core Atom processor with a WiFi transceiver. This could eliminate the need for external transceivers on Atom-powered devices, reducing the platform's board footprint, and of course, power draw.

The current chip comes with its share of limitations. It supports just 2.4 GHz radio band. According to Intel's Justin Rattner, the chip should scale with Moore's Law, and future versions could have greater capabilities, including cellular data, and built-in antennae. Production versions of the chip aren't due for another two years, so it's safe to assume that Rosepoint is just a development milestone.

Source: Guru3D

Lucid Demos Thunderbolt-based External Graphics for Ultrabooks

Ultrabooks, despite their formidable computing power compared to netbooks, inevitably trade some of it for lower thermal/power specifications. LucidLogix feels that Ultrabook users could gain graphics processing power on demand using external graphics cards, that work in tandem with its VirtuMVP GPU virtualization technology. At IDF, the company demonstrated an external graphics card that uses 10 Gb/s Thunderbolt interface to communicate with an Ultrabook.

Lucid's external graphics card is a Thunderbolt to PCI-Express enclosure, which runs an AMD Radeon HD 6700 series GPU. With the VirtuMVP layer running, the Ultrabook uses the graphics computing power of the external graphics card to render complex graphics onto its display, which is wired to the processor's integrated graphics core. Lucid's idea of on-demand graphics compute power allows Thunderbolt-equipped Ultrabooks of all shapes and sizes to lack a discrete GPU, which adds to the device's cost, and taps its limited power and thermal-control resources. At the moment, Lucid's external graphics cards are still in development, with no concrete release date in sight. The concept is solid.

Source: LaptopMag

OCZ Shows off Barefoot 3-Powered SSD at IDF

Yesterday at the Intel Developer Forum 2012 in San Francisco the OCZ Technology Group (OCZ for short) provided a quick peek at its upcoming solid state drive named Vector. Coming in a 2.5-inch form factor, the Vector features a Barefoot 3 controller (designed by Indilinx from top to bottom, unlike the Barefoot 2 which has Marvell technology), 2x nm MLC NAND, and a SATA 6.0 Gbps interface. Unfortunately OCZ didn't say anything about the drive's performance.

The Vector is set to be released in Q4 in at least two capacities - 256 GB and 512 GB.

Source: Engadget

Seagate and Intel to Demonstrate Solid State Hybrid Drive Capabilities at IDF

Seagate Technology announced today that they will be working with Intel Corporation to demonstrate new advancements in solid state hybrid drives (SSHD) at this year's Intel Developer Forum taking place September 11-13, 2012, at the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco. In the Advanced Technology Zone of the event, Intel will demonstrate Seagate's latest solid state hybrid drive design, accelerated with Intel Smart Response Technology, which run common office productivity applications almost on par with solid state drives.

Separately, an educational presentation titled "Ultrabook Responsiveness: Performance & Power End-Users Can Feel", will provide details on how SSHD technology combined with Intel Smart Response Technology will contribute to a powerful new combination of performance and capacity in the next generation Ultrabook devices. Solid state hybrid drives combine performance similar to a solid state drive with the large capacity of a hard disk drive in a single disk drive enclosure.

Despite Estimates Cuts, Analyst Bets on Haswell Success

Following last Friday's Q3 outlook lowering by Intel, market punters such as Merrill Lynch cut estimates. Vivek Arya, an analyst with the firm, cut its Q3 and Q4 estimates for Intel, while remaining optimistic about upcoming processes in the company's pitched battle with ARM in the lightweight SoC segment. Arya believes that with upcoming technologies, Intel has a fighting chance against ARM heavyweights. Said Arya in his report:
Next-gen chip manufacturing has become a 3-horse race between Intel, TSMC and Samsung, with Intel holding a 1 to 4 year lead, in our view. As we saw in 1H12, foundries were unable to ramp 28nm capacity, leading to product delays. Rising costs/ complexity (tri-gate) could further widen this gap. We believe this could enable Intel to gain a foothold (vs. zero today) in mobile over the next 2 years, as smartphone/tablet vendors look to Intel as a second or even primary source […] We firmly believe in Intel’s ability to reliably produce the lowest cost and highest performance silicon can help it maintain a dominant position in servers/data centers (20% of sales, 10-15% CAGR), and transition from legacy PCs to next-gen smartphones, tablets, Ultrabooks and other converged devices in the next 1-2 years. Investors, meanwhile, benefit from a 3.6% div yield, $7.5bn in available buybacks (6% of mkt cap) and <10x PE.

MSI Working On "Letexo" Variant of its Own

At IDF Beijing, 2012, Intel unveiled a large selection of its upcoming Ultrabook designs, including what it referred to as "Letexo," a sliding-Ultrabook, which bridges the gap between high-performance Windows 8 tablets, and Ultrabooks (devices with keyboards). MSI is working on one such device, which lays to rest the looming question of whether the company plans to do Ultrabook PCs. The unnamed Letexo by MSI was unveiled as a teaser picture, earlier today. The device is a fully functional Windows 8 tablet, driven by Intel architecture, a comfortable and responsive chiclet keyboard slides out, when you have a lot of typing to do. We expect to see this device at Computex.

Intel to Push for Higher Resolution PC Displays, Arrive in 2013

Come 2013, and PC consumers could finally break the shackles of regressive PC resolution "standards" such as 1366x768 and 1920x1080, if Intel has its way. At a presentation at IDF Beijing, Intel expressed its desire to see much higher resolution displays for all computing devices, not just PCs, which could in true terms be "retina-matched" display resolutions. At an optimal (comfortable) viewing distance, the resolution of a computing device's screen should match that of your eyes.

If Intel has its way, a 21" all-in-one desktop PC, and a 15" notebook PC screen will have a resolution of 3840x2160 pixels; a 13" Ultrabook PC could have a resolution of 2800x1800 pixels, a 11" Ultrabook and 10" tablet with 2560x1440, and 5" handheld/smartphone with 1280x800. Compare these to the $500+ 27" 1920x1080 monitors that are still sold in the market! A very bold proposal, but one only a company with the industry prominence of Intel can pull off.

Source: Liliputing

7 mm Won't Cut It, Intel Wants 5 mm-Thick Drives for Ultrabooks

Custodian of the Ultrabook specification, Intel pushed the storage industry to churn out slimmer devices to go with increasingly slimmer Ultrabooks sold by the various partner ODMs in the ecosystem. Even as HDD and SSD makers have only just come up with 7 mm-thick storage devices, Intel has a fresh list of changes it wishes to see with storage devices in the very near future, to be able to make it to the constantly-evolving Ultrabook specification. Intel wants near-future storage devices (SSDs and HDDs) to be no thicker than 5 mm.

Further, it wants to see the standard SATA host interface changed from "around" (out of) form, to "along" (inside) form host interface, which further slims down the drive compartment. These proposals were floated at IDF, Beijing. While coming up with slimmer SSDs was never really a tough task for SSD makers, as SSDs are essentially just millimeter-thick printed circuit boards with millimeter-thick components (controller logic, NAND flash memory, and ancillaries), it posed a huge technical challange to mechanical HDD designers, who have had to slim down key components that work to maintain inertial motion of spinning platters. This new proposal for 5 mm-thick HDDs could pose a newer, tougher desgin challenge.

Source: VR-Zone

Intel SSD 910 Series PCI-Express Launch Imminent

Intel is on the brink of launching its new line of enterprise PCI-Express SSDs, codenamed "Ramsdale", carrying the market name "SSD 910 Series". The new SSD 910 series is coming to existence leapfrogging SSD 710 series, which was also codenamed "Ramsdale", but never made it to the market. The original Ramsdale SSD 720 was meant to be primarily based on SLC NAND flash memory with the probability of an MLC variant, Intel decided against launching it, probably because it was hedging its bets on 25 nm HET-MLC NAND flash, which provides endurance levels closer to SLC, while offering the capacity-advantage of MLC. The SSD 910 implements this new NAND flash standard that attempts to offer the best of both SLC and MLC.

The new SSD 910 will be available in two capacity options: 400 GB and 800 GB. Built as a PCI-Express expansion card, the SSD 910 consists of three stacked PCBs that hold SSD subunits and HET-MLC NAND flash chips, lots of them. Each of these subunits interfaces with the core logic over SAS. The core logic connects to the host over PCI-Express 2.0 x8 bus interface. The 400 GB variant provides sequential read speeds up to 1 GB/s, and up to 750 MB/s writes. The 800 GB variant provides up to 2 GB/s reads, with up to 1 GB/s writes.

Intel Developer Forum: 'Collaborative Innovation' Key to Growth for Intel and Chinese

Throughout Intel Corporation's developer forum that starts today, company executives emphasized the importance of collaborating with China's government and industry to help create new business and innovation opportunities for Intel and its 14 million developers worldwide. The management team detailed its vision of how such collaborations could potentially spawn the next-generation of advances in business, consumer electronics and many more industries around the globe.

"The impact of major global trends, such as the rapidly growing middle class as well as the explosive growth of connected, mobile Internet and cloud computing traffic, is playing out ten-fold in China," said Sean Maloney, executive vice president of Intel Corporation and chairman of Intel China.
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