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Eugene Kaspersky Wins V3's Technology Hero of 2012 Award

Kaspersky Lab's CEO and co-founder, Eugene Kaspersky, has been voted Technology Hero of the Year in the third annual V3 technology awards. This is considered a massive achievement due to the award being presented to no other than the late Apple CEO, Steve Jobs in 2011.
Voted for by V3 readers, this prestigious award recognises Eugene's huge impact on the security industry over the past 15 years since Kaspersky Lab was founded. From Flame to Madi, inspiring leader Eugene has been at the fore-front of all of the company's ground-breaking malware discoveries and offered his expert advice to businesses and consumers alike.

"Our malware discoveries are dedicated to making the online world a safer place, so it's great to see the appreciation by winning this award", explains Eugene Kaspersky. "Being recognised as Technology Hero of the Year is an amazing achievement for not just myself, but Kaspersky Lab as a company due to the time and commitment spent on fighting cybercrime both before it occurs and during."

Kaspersky Lab and Facebook Partner to Make Social Networking Safer

Kaspersky Lab, a leading developer of security and threat management solutions, today announced a partnership with Facebook, with the goal of enhancing the security of social networking both online and offline. Kaspersky Lab is now supplying Facebook with up-to-the-minute data about the latest malicious software threats worldwide, which will be used to protect Facebook users from inadvertently visiting malicious web pages.

People are more likely to click on a link shared by a friend, and this inherent trust is something cyber-criminals prey upon. Malicious URLs can automatically share themselves with a victim's personal contacts without the user's knowledge, making the links appear legitimate. Now, when Facebook users share or click a link shared by their friends, the link will instantly be compared against Kaspersky Lab's database of malicious web pages. If the link matches Facebook's list of known 'bad' URLs - which are supplied to Facebook by Kaspersky Lab and other security vendors - the user will be immediately notified and blocked from visiting the web page. This not only prevents the user's personal information and computer from being put at risk, but stops the malicious links from spreading further.

Kaspersky Lab Discovers "miniFlame," a New Virus Designed for Cyber Espionage

Today Kaspersky Lab announced the discovery of miniFlame, a small and highly flexible malicious program designed to steal data and control infected systems during targeted cyber espionage operations.

miniFlame, also known as SPE, was found by Kaspersky Lab’s experts in July 2012, and was originally identified as a Flame module. However, in September 2012, Kaspersky Lab’s research team conducted an in-depth analysis of Flame’s command & control servers (C&C) and from the analysis found that the miniFlame module was actually an interoperable tool that could be used as an independent malicious program, or concurrently as plug-in for both the Flame and Gauss malware.

Analysis of miniFlame showed there were several versions created between 2010 and 2011, with some variants still being active in the wild. The analysis also revealed new evidence of the cooperation between the creators of Flame and Gauss, as both malicious programs can use miniFlame as a “plug-in” for their operations.

Apple Invites Kaspersky to Improve OS X Security

Weeks after security mogul Eugene Kaspersky opined that Apple is "10 years behind Microsoft on security," Kaspersky Lab revealed that it is collaborating with Apple to investigate security concerns (read: vulnerabilities) of its operating systems, and improve its security. Kaspersky Lab CTO Nikolai Grebennikov in an interview with Computing.co.uk was quoted saying "Apple recently invited us to improve its security."

Kaspersky Lab maintains that Apple's software is extremely vulnerable, going as far as to claim that Apple doesn't pay enough attention to security. "Our first investigations show Apple doesn't pay enough attention to security. For example, Oracle closed a vulnerability in Java, which was a target for a major botnet several months ago," said Grebennikov. Apple's decision to handle updates of Java runtime environment for OS X by itself, breaking away from Oracle's update cycle, particularly drew flack from Grebennikov. "Apple blocked Oracle from updating Java on Mac OS, and they perform all the udpates themselves. They only released the patch a few weeks ago – two or three months after the Oracle patch. That's far too long," he said. Kaspersky isn't too optimistic about the infinitely more popular iOS platform, either. "Our experience tells us that in the near future, perhaps in a year or so, we will see the first malware targeting iOS," it commented.Source: Computing.co.uk

Apple 10 Years Behind Microsoft on Security: Kaspersky Lab

A Flashback trojan that affected over 600,000 OS X machines with relative ease, earlier this month, exposed gaping holes in the OS X software architecture and got industry experts discussing how competent Apple is at dealing with the threat of malware, on its end. Eugene Kaspersky, CEO and co-founder of security company Kaspersky Lab, believes that Apple is "10 years behind Microsoft in terms of security," and the ease with which scores of OS X machines could be compromised by malware in the recent times formed the basis of his assertion.

"For many years I've been saying that from a security point of view there is no big difference between Mac and Windows. It's always been possible to develop Mac malware, but this one was a bit different. For example it was asking questions about being installed on the system and, using vulnerabilities, it was able to get to the user mode without any alarms," Kaspersky commented. Increase in malware and cybercrime against OS X machines, according to him are "just a question of time and market share. Cyber criminals have now recognised that Mac is an interesting area. Now we have more, it's not just Flashback or Flashfake. Welcome to Microsoft's world, Mac. It's full of malware."

Source: CBROnline

Got A Virus? It's Your Fault Says Microsoft

Yes, that's right the maker of notoriously vulnerable software is now blaming you, the user, should you get a virus, trojan or other malware infection on your Windows computer. However, it does look like they have some justification for saying this. For those with long attention spans, Microsoft have just released their 168 page Microsoft Security Intelligence Report 6MB PDF, with the stated aim of providing:
An in-depth perspective on software vulnerabilities and exploits, malicious code threats, and potentially unwanted software in the first half of 2011
The first thing to note about the report is that it is limited to its Malicious Software Removal Tool and Microsoft's other anti-malware products. Zero-day attacks that it can't detect are not included in the findings. So, surely it can't all be the user's fault then? It also means that the security angles from third party security vendors such as Kaspersky, Norton and McAfee aren't represented here.

Green House Intros 32 GB PicoDrive N Flash Drive

Green House expanded its PicoDrive N series of USB flash drives with a new 32 GB model. This USB 2.0 compliant flash drive offers 32 GB of storage in a form-factor measuring 54.1(W) × 18.0(D) × 8.1(H) mm, weighing a little over 7 g. It is security-enhanced with access password protection, and bundles a trial version of Kaspersky Internet Security 2011. It is set for market release in mid-December.

Source: Akihabara News

Kaspersky Lab Releases Technical Prototype of Kaspersky Anti-Virus for Windows 7

Kaspersky Lab, a leading producer of secure content management solutions, announces the release of a technical prototype of Kaspersky Anti-Virus for Windows 7. The prototype is based on the new antivirus engine which provides complex antivirus protection from all types of Internet threats.

The new technical prototype of Kaspersky Anti-Virus is designed to secure computers running under Windows 7. The beta test version of Microsoft Windows 7 operating system was released at the beginning of January 2009. Kaspersky Lab simultaneously released its technical prototype providing greater efficiency and complex antivirus protection for the new operating system.

CPU Errata Turn Security Vulnerabilities

Security vulnerabilities have plagued the computing world ever since computing became a significant advance of mankind. As of today, the plethora of security software we use that gobble money, system resources and network bandwidth to keep our computers and networks safe, have done a good job and it's relatively 'peaceful' these days. And just when we thought so, enter Kris Kaspersky, eminent security researcher, comes up with the hypothesis that microcode errors, known errors and flaws in the design of CPUs could be exploited by malicious code to attack and compromise systems irrespective of which operating system (OS) and other software are running. Kaspersky claims that different errata of the CPU could be exploited differently.

Kaspersky Update Quarantines Windows Explorer

We all know that Windows Explorer can be a bit of a nuisance from time to time, but classifying it as malware is a little extreme. However, that’s just what an update for Kaspersky Lab’s antivirus did earlier this week, resulting in explorer.exe being quarantined or, in extreme cases, deleted. The update, which was released at around 7:00pm on Wednesday, was only active for about two hours before Kaspersky became aware of the issue and withdrew it to limit the damaged it caused. David Emm, a senior technology consultant at Kaspersky, gave the following statement:
This is classic false-alarm territory. We will check through our systems and see if we can tighten them up so we don't run into this problem in the future. No antivirus company, including ourselves, can say they have never had a false alarm [but], on all fronts, we do what we can to minimise any potential risk for our customers.
Fortunately only one corporate customer and a handful of home users have reported being affected by this problem.Source: ZDNet.com
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