Thursday, August 13th 2009

Core i5 750 Gets First Listing

A little over a fortnight away from launch, one of Intel's first socket LGA-1156 processors, the Core i5 750 has started being listed on popular American online (and ground) retailer Fry's. Not for pre-order or expected stock, but accepting orders for same-day shipping! The processor ended up being priced just where we expected it to be: around the $200 mark (listed on roadmaps so far as $196).

Based on the Nehalem architecture, the Core i5 750 "Lynnfield" is a monolithic quad-core processor with a clock speed of 2.66 GHz, with a QuickPath Interconnect connection to the northbridge it shares the chip package with. It features 256 KB L2 caches per core, and a shared 8 MB L3 cache. Its integrated DDR3 memory controller addresses dual-channel memory. The listing can be found here.
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39 Comments on Core i5 750 Gets First Listing

#1
mudkip
SNiiPE_DoGG said:
Say goodbye to the i7 920 people ;)
I'm ready for the battle i5 vs i7
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#2
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Waiting for 32nm to upgrade, I'm fine with my 775 setups. I'll be focusing on getting my AMD rig up to snuff, it is in desperate need of a new processor.

AltecV1 said:
but then again if you broke an arm you dont have to bay the hospital like some people in tha most powerfull country in the world(USA):laugh:
I know this is rather off topic, but they do pay, just not directly. Their higher taxes pays for their healthcare. It is basically forced health insurance. And poor quality health insurance at that... Countries with government healthcare have much higher mortality rates for things like Cancer, mainly due to the long wait times for treatment. And things that my health insurance covers, would not be covered in the UK or Canada under their government healthcare.
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#3
mosheen
is there an i7 850 in the works??
can't find much info.
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#4
mdbrotha03
It does not use QPI, it uses DMI. That is the sole reason why there is a PCI Express controller in the chip. There isn't enough bandwidth over DMI to power graphics cards.

I don't understand why there is any confusion on this. The information has been available since May.
http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=3570&p=2
Posted on Reply
#5
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Wow! Not many people get the concept of LGA-1156 AT ALL!



The green rectangle shows denotes processor package. There are two separate dies under the IHS of a Lynnfield, one CPU die, and a northbridge die. QPI connects the two. So Lynnfield DOES use QPI.

Since the NB is inside the CPU chip package, PCI-E devices connect directly to the chip package. DMI is not a system interface!
Posted on Reply
#6
mdbrotha03
So how does the Processor and everything that is package with it interface with the rest of the system?
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#7
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
mdbrotha03 said:
So how does the Processor and everything that is package with it interface with the rest of the system?
The CPU die talks to DDR3 memory directly over memory IO, PCI-E devices talk directly to the NB die, and NB talks to the PCH (which is just a glorified southbridge) through DMI,

Just as in Bloomfield where, the CPU talks directly to memory, PCI-E devices directly to talk to the NB, and the NB talks to the SB through DMI.

Use some rational thinking, all DMI provides is 2 GB/s. You think a processor talks to the rest of the system over a 2 GB/s connection? :wtf:

A system bus is what connects the CPU to the rest of the system. DMI is not doing that. What comes out of the CPU die is a QPI connection to the NB (the rest of the system), and Memory IO to talk to the memory. So for Lynnfield, the system interface is QPI.
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#8
mdbrotha03
It is rational, I asked you how does the processor talk to the rest of the system. In 1156 processor also include the NB and PCI express. So the rest of the system would include the PCH. Which would make DMI the interface the Processor uses to the rest of the system.
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#9
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
mdbrotha03 said:
It is rational, I asked you how does the processor talk to the rest of the system. In 1156 processor also include the NB and PCI express. So the rest of the system would include the PCH. Which would make DMI the interface the Processor uses to the rest of the system.
The 'processor' here is the CPU die. Not the entire chip. The CPU die is talking to everything outside of it using memory IO and QPI, this is in no way different from Bloomfield, where the CPU die talks to everything outside of it using memory IO and QPI.

DMI is a chipset bus, and on a Lynnfield machine all it's doing is connecting the NB die to the PCH, because 2 GB/s is all that it a chipset bus needs.
Posted on Reply
#10
kylzer
btarunr said:
The 'processor' here is the CPU die. Not the entire chip. The CPU die is talking to everything outside of it using memory IO and QPI, this is in no way different from Bloomfield, where the CPU die talks to everything outside of it using memory IO and QPI.

DMI is a chipset bus, and on a Lynnfield machine all it's doing is connecting the NB die to the PCH, because 2 GB/s is all that it a chipset bus needs.
Wow you really know your stuff well i understand it allot better now thanks :)
Posted on Reply
#11
rajan1311
any idea how much the entry level motherboards would cost ?
Posted on Reply
#12
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
rajan1311 said:
any idea how much the entry level motherboards would cost ?
Starts 6000 rupees. (Ranged $100~$300, but the cheapest ones will start at ~$120 or ~$130, they'll gradually come down to ~$100.)
Posted on Reply
#13
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
Wow, I expected it to be cheaper. I also read that Core I7 may work in lga 1156 sockets.
Posted on Reply
#14
phanbuey
WarEagleAU said:
Wow, I expected it to be cheaper. I also read that Core I7 may work in lga 1156 sockets.
nah theyre going to name some 1156 socket CPU's "core i7" but no LGA 1366 will work in LGA 1156. Its just a bunch of propaganda.
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