Monday, December 14th 2009

Gulftown Product Name and Tentative Price Surfaces

Contrary to older reports, Intel will stick to the Core i7 brand identifier to sell its first consumer (client) six-core processor based on the Nehalem architecture, codenamed "Gulftown". The first offering of these socket LGA-1366 processors, is the Core i7 980X Extreme Edition. Its positioning and pricing shows that Intel will replace its current flagship desktop processor, the Core i7 975 Extreme Edition with it, and at the very same price-point of US $999 (in 1000 unit tray quantities).

A future price list also shows that the Core i7 980X Extreme Edition is slated for March 2010. A month ahead of its launch, Intel will introduce the Core i7 930, which succeeds the Core i7 920 at its price-point of $284. The Gulftown core will be manufactured on Intel's brand new 32 nm HKMG process, it features 6 processing cores with 12 threads (HyperThreading Technology), triple-channel DDR3 memory with its integrated memory controller, 6.4 GT/s QPI link to the Intel X58 Express chipset, 12 MB of L3 cache, compatibility to platforms that support the Core i7 9xx processors, and 130W TDP. The Core i7 980X Extreme Edition comes with a clock speed of 3.33 GHz, The Core i7 930 on the other hand, is a quad-core processor which runs at 2.80 GHz.

Sources: PCOnline.com.cn, ZOL.com.cn
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66 Comments on Gulftown Product Name and Tentative Price Surfaces

#1
SummerDays
QPI rates are just measured based on data flow aren't they? :)
Posted on Reply
#2
Binge
Overclocking Surrealism
SummerDays said:
QPI rates are just measured based on data flow aren't they? :)
Yes, now I did something funny. I set my QPI at 4.8GT/s in bios, and when I get into windows I have this...



To me that just confirms that the QPI setting is only a multiplier, and that multiplier (x36) doesn't change on a 920. Even if you're at 133. If you set the multiplier higher, but it won't actually go higher. Overclocking the QPI is possible by increasing the BCLK on a 920, but you can't actually change it just by fiddling with the multiplier.

::EDIT:: Color me funny but you can actually set your QPI higher at 133, and only 133. That's brilliant! It does absolutely nothing since neither the cpu multiplier or bclk are high enough for it to be bottlenecked. On EE chips you can actually set your QPI to (x48) with higher BCLKs and it will work whereas it won't on my 920.
Posted on Reply
#3
phanbuey
Binge said:
Yes, now I did something funny. I set my QPI at 4.8GT/s in bios, and when I get into windows I have this...

http://img.techpowerup.org/091214/qpi.jpg

To me that just confirms that the QPI setting is only a multiplier, and that multiplier (x36) doesn't change on a 920. Even if you're at 133. If you set the multiplier higher, but it won't actually go higher. Overclocking the QPI is possible by increasing the BCLK on a 920, but you can't actually change it just by fiddling with the multiplier.
Nice to know for my pending 930 purchase. :toast:
Posted on Reply
#4
SummerDays
When you change the QPI to 6.4 in your motherboard bios (like on this Asus Rampage II

Extreme) it changes the QPI clock frequency to 3.2 Ghz.

To achieve the actual throughput your system is going to have to be clocked faster than 2.66 Ghz.

You can't change the multiplier to reach 4 Ghz. So how are you going to do it?

:roll:

In any case, when Intel is making their i7 series chip, do they make them all exactly the same and then product bin them?
Posted on Reply
#5
Binge
Overclocking Surrealism
SummerDays said:
When you change the QPI to 6.4 in your motherboard bios (like on this Asus Rampage II

Extreme) it changes the QPI clock frequency to 3.2 Ghz.

To achieve the actual throughput your system is going to have to be clocked faster than 2.66 Ghz.

You can't change the multiplier to reach 4 Ghz. So how are you going to do it?

:roll:

In any case, when Intel is making their i7 series chip, do they make them all exactly the same and then product bin them?
To a degree, yes. Though there have been 920s out there that will chew the pants off of an EE chip until sub-0 CPU temperatures are introduced.
Posted on Reply
#6
SummerDays
Anyways, after all that..

Setting the QPI results in a 3.2 Ghz speed.

Since they consider it bi-directional, they must get 6.4 GTransfers out of it.

Is that not the proof we were looking for? (correct me if I'm wrong here someone) :D

Which brings me back to my original question: will we be able to do that on the 930?!
Posted on Reply
#7
Binge
Overclocking Surrealism
SummerDays said:
Anyways, after all that..

Setting the QPI results in a 3.2 Ghz speed.

Since they consider it bi-directional, they must get 6.4 GTransfers out of it.

Is that not the proof we were looking for? (correct me if I'm wrong here someone) :D

Which brings me back to my original question: will we be able to do that on the 930?!
Set the QPI multiplier to x48 at only a 133 BCLK? You should have your answer, and like you said it doesn't matter since the power will not exist to utilize all of that bandwidth.
Posted on Reply
#8
SummerDays
>> You should have your answer, and like you said it doesn't matter since the power will not exist to utilize all of that bandwidth

I don't have DDR3 2000 Ghz+ Ram sitting on my desk, though, which brings us back to being able to simply select the speed of the ram in use. We're only talking about 24.6 GB/s though.

btw, if you're doing this (the guy with houses face whose name right now eludes me), the motherboard will default to a higher memory setting. Make sure you reduce it to what your memory is rated for. I reduced it in the bios to 1.51 volts so it wouldn't increase automatically to 1.65 volts or 1.8 volts.
Posted on Reply
#9
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
I've done it loads of times. I did a few memory tests and in fact at 2.66ghz it's actually slightly slower than at 4.8GT/s. However if I oc it then it will perform faster but I fear that my oc will be less due to the QPI being way to high.
Posted on Reply
#10
Binge
Overclocking Surrealism
SummerDays said:
>> You should have your answer, and like you said it doesn't matter since the power will not exist to utilize all of that bandwidth

I don't have DDR3 2000 Ghz+ Ram sitting on my desk, though, which brings us back to being able to simply select the speed of the ram in use. We're only talking about 24.6 GB/s though.

btw, if you're doing this (the guy with houses face whose name right now eludes me), the motherboard will default to a higher memory setting. Make sure you reduce it to what your memory is rated for. I reduced it in the bios to 1.51 volts so it wouldn't increase automatically to 1.65 volts or 1.8 volts.
You don't need 2GHz ram to use 6.4GT/s bandwidth, you need a cpu that's operating quickly enough to use the ram.
Posted on Reply
#11
[I.R.A]_FBi
Weer said:
You kidding? Of course there are.

6-core Xeon - HERE I COME! :rockout:
linksys?
Posted on Reply
#12
SummerDays
Binge said:
You don't need 2GHz ram to use 6.4GT/s bandwidth, you need a cpu that's operating quickly enough to use the ram.
You do need fast memory. We're talking about a fast link between a CPU and Memory.

Obviously you need fast memory on the other side of the link in order take advantage of the link speed.

As well, if you're really going to overclock, you'll need the fast memory to do it!
Posted on Reply
#13
Hayder_Master
damn only extreme version , any news for six core non extreme
Posted on Reply
#14
Chad Boga
Kantastic said:
I want to see what AMD has to offer in 2010 before deciding whether or not I want to switch platforms. I just went from i7 to AM3 and don't want to do it again.
Why did you do this? :twitch:
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