Tuesday, September 21st 2010

Leaked HDCP Master Key Legit: Intel

Earlier this month, it was reported that the master-key that overrides or unlocks HDCP-encrypted digital content may have been leaked. The worst fears of the HDCP team are coming true, with Intel, a main developer of HDCP, confirming that the master-key leak is genuine. High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) is everywhere, wherever there's commercial high-definition video content, such as Blu-ray movie titles, HDTV set-top boxes, PCs capable of Blu-ray playback, and so on. It is an encryption layer that protects the HD content in its natural audio-video quality from being ripped. Without HDCP one would still be able to watch HD content, albeit with degraded quality.

The immediate repercussions of the master key leak are directed at consumer electronics manufacturers, they might hesitate to adopt HDCP paying its royalty for making use of the protocol, there is technically no fidelity left in it. Grey-market and el-cheapo consumer electronic manufacturers can circumvent HDCP compliance to offer near-perfect video playback. What's worse, it's party-time for pirates. Devices that recover digital content while retaining perfect picture/audio quality by stripping out the encryption can be made. Whatever the consequences Intel maintains it won't affect HDCP much.

"We believe that this technology will remain effective," said Intel's spokesperson Tom Waldrop. "There's a large install base of licensed devices including several hundred licensees that will continue to use it and in any case, were a (circumvention) device to appear that attempts to take advantage of this particular hack there are legal remedies, particularly under the DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act)," he added. This indicates that the publishing industry will indeed have to fall back to DMCA for enforcing IPR. Again, a company the size of Intel won't leave any stone unturned in pursuing manufacturers of unauthorized devices.Source: CNET
Add your own comment

32 Comments on Leaked HDCP Master Key Legit: Intel

#1
Dippyskoodlez
kaneda said:

Nothing ever stops the pirates.
When the end user has physical access to the hardware/software, and it's not able to be monitored, it cannot be secured.

Ever.

Atleast they weren't suprised with this leak like they were with the last one.

COUGH AACS COUGH.
:roll:
Posted on Reply
#2
Mussels
Moderprator
1freedude said:
I don't remember where I read it, but there is a new type of drm that can prevent playback, regardless of hdcp, hdmi, anydvd, even cams will not play.

from what I remember, an inaudible tone is part of the soundtrack. if the playing device "hears" this tone, playback is not possible, regardless of hdcp.
that can be beaten just as well - once they find out where those audio tones are, a program can re-encode the audio to remove it.

its not that its uncrackable, its just gunna take some time to do it.
Posted on Reply
#4
Mussels
Moderprator
Wile E said:
It's called Cinavia.

And thus far, all processes that remove it are destructive to the audio. Can't losslessly rip it.
so far.

i have no doubts that it will either be 'cracked' to allow it being stripped or bypassed entirely, via software on PC or mods on the playback devices.
Posted on Reply
#5
Wile E
Power User
Mussels said:
so far.

i have no doubts that it will either be 'cracked' to allow it being stripped or bypassed entirely, via software on PC or mods on the playback devices.
No, there is nothing to crack. It's not encryption or key based. It's an inaudible to humans audio watermark. Removing a watermark of any kind is destructive, period.

The only way to bypass it, is to use a player that doesn't support it. It's not a big deal yet, as only the PS3, and one or two other players actually support it. And only one BD has it so far. It's being used mostly in cinemas to stop CAMs, but it could become a large issue if it takes hold in the BD market.
Posted on Reply
#6
streetfighter 2
I'm kinda confused by this key leak and the reaction it's getting.

From what I know (or rather what I think I know) the biggest practical use of this key is just making third-party (unlicensed) HDCP-compliant devices.

It doesn't make sense to capture a blu-ray stream for the purpose of direct copying because the bandwidth is too great.

It's already plenty easy to rip a blu-ray using software like AnyDVD and encode it using something like Ripbot264.
Posted on Reply
#7
Wile E
Power User
streetfighter 2 said:
I'm kinda confused by this key leak and the reaction it's getting.

From what I know (or rather what I think I know) the biggest practical use of this key is just making third-party (unlicensed) HDCP-compliant devices.

It doesn't make sense to capture a blu-ray stream for the purpose of direct copying because the bandwidth is too great.

It's already plenty easy to rip a blu-ray using software like AnyDVD and encode it using something like Ripbot264.
Yeah, that's what point I was trying to make with my earlier comments. It only effects displaying the content on a screen, not ripping it.
Posted on Reply