Friday, February 3rd 2012

AMD Strategy Transformation Brings Agile Delivery of Industry-Leading IP

At its annual Financial Analyst Day, AMD (NYSE: AMD) detailed a new “ambidextrous” strategy that builds on the company’s long history of x86 and graphics innovation while embracing other technologies and intellectual property to deliver differentiated products.

AMD is adopting an SoC-centric roadmap designed to speed time-to-market, drive sustained execution, and enable the development of more tailored customer solutions. SoC design methodology is advantageous because it is a modular approach to processor design, leveraging best practice tools and microprocessor design flows with the ability to easily re-use IP and design blocks across a range of products.

“AMD’s strategy capitalizes on the convergence of technologies and devices that will define the next era of the industry,” said Rory Read, president and CEO, AMD. “The trends around consumerization, the cloud and convergence will only grow stronger in the coming years. AMD has a unique opportunity to take advantage of this key industry inflection point. We remain focused on continuing the work we began last year to re-position AMD. Our new strategy will help AMD embrace the shifts occurring in the industry, marrying market needs with innovative technologies and become a consistent growth engine.”

Roadmap Updates Focus on Customer Needs
Additionally, AMD today announced updates to its product roadmaps for AMD Central Processing Unit (CPU) and Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) products it plans to introduce in 2012 and 2013. The roadmap modifications address key customer priorities across form factors including ultrathin notebooks, tablets, all-in-ones, desktops and servers with a clear focus on low power, emerging markets and the Cloud.

AMD’s updated product roadmap features second generation mainstream (“Trinity”) and low-power (“Brazos 2.0”) APUs for notebooks and desktops; “Hondo,” an APU specifically designed for tablets; new CPU cores in 2012 and 2013 with “Piledriver” and its successor, “Steamroller,” as well as “Jaguar,” which is the successor to AMD’s popular “Bobcat” core. In 2012, AMD plans to introduce four new AMD Opteron processors. For a more in-depth look at AMD’s updated product roadmap, please visit http://blogs.amd.com.

Next-generation Architecture Standardizes and Facilitates Software Development
AMD also provided further details on its Heterogeneous System Architecture (HSA), which enables software developers to easily program APUs by combining scalar processing on the CPU with parallel processing on the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), all while providing high bandwidth access to memory at low power. AMD is proactively working to make HSA an open industry standard for the developer community. The company plans to hold its 2nd annual AMD Fusion Developer Summit in June, 2012.

New Company Structure Strengthens Execution
In conjunction with announcing its restructuring plan in November 2011, AMD has strengthened its leadership team with the additions of Mark Papermaster as senior vice president and chief technology officer, Rajan Naik as senior vice president and chief strategy officer, and Lisa Su as senior vice president and general manager, global business units. These executives will help ensure that sustainable, dependable execution becomes a hallmark of AMD.

Visit the AMD Financial Analyst Day website for webcast replay, presentations, updated roadmap, and more.
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30 Comments on AMD Strategy Transformation Brings Agile Delivery of Industry-Leading IP

#1
Triny
Beyond Apex

AMD is leveraging it's igp hd 7900G series by 2013
With both cpu and igp humming alongside a discrete card hd7990
utilizing HSA

Certainly we are entering a new era of heterogeneous systems architecture
where both cpu and igp compute simultaneously
soon laptops will perform similarly as desktops do at a fraction the price
low heat, low noise ,low price solutions.
There wont be much of a reason to not move on to smaller platforms for all but extremists.
Posted on Reply
#2
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Desktops provide for upgrades and upgrades and upgrades, laptops are normally limited due to proprietary designs.

Triny said:
AMD is leveraging it's igp hd 7900G series by 2013
With both cpu and igp humming alongside a discrete card hd7990
utilizing HSA

Certainly we are entering a new era of heterogeneous systems architecture
where both cpu and igp compute simultaneously
soon laptops will perform similarly as desktops do at a fraction the price
low heat, low noise ,low price solutions.
There wont be much of a reason to not move on to smaller platforms for all but extremists.
Posted on Reply
#3
Fourstaff
I am with Mailman on this one, however I think that instead of tablets having more power than a desktop, I think what is going to happen is that we stuff so much power into the portable devices that we effectively don't need the power a desktop gives anymore. Also, with newer ports such as USB3.0 and Thunderbolt means that we can easily have a docking station attached to our "portable computer", and connect all our shits through that. I have not used a desktop as my primary machine for years already, and I don't miss the "oh but you cannot upgrade lolololol" part. My shitty laptop provides me with enough power for my gaming and work needs, I will replace it with another laptop when this one gets decommissioned. I am more than willing to sacrifice some performance for portability and convenience.
Posted on Reply
#4
Goodman
I kind of agree with the Mailman78...

I've been seeing this coming for years , laptop are becoming better much powerful & pretty soon it will be cheaper to buy than a Desktop at same performance level

Custom PC will becoming obsolete in the next decade , look around you guys do you still see electronic repair chop near you?
Not much ill bet if any , repairs cost more or than buying something new most of the time or if cheaper it won't be by that much

Same will go for laptop soon , example you paid a laptop $500 & dies in about 18 months coast or repair $300 , buying a new laptop $450 which will be at least 25% faster then the one you bought at $500 a year & half before , which will you choose?

As everything becoming "all in one" & cheaper to built well... need to say more?

BTW: Still don't like laptops vs desktop but i may have to soon enough...:mad:
Posted on Reply
#5
Super XP
I love my Notebook and Tablet, and the ease of useis fantastic, but when it comes to real Gaming, my Desktop blows any of my portable devices in the dust.

There's just something cool about building a gaming/everyday use PC that is fun. I also like the fact I can upgrade it with anything I wish for.

Desktops are losing popularity, but not at the rate people think. They will continue to be a healthy desktop market for many years to come. :D
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