Tuesday, May 29th 2012

Swiftech Launches the Apogee Drive II CPU Water-Block with Integrated Pump

Swiftech today announced the release of the Apogee Drive II, a CPU waterblock featuring an integrated pump. "Like a phoenix rising from its ashes, the Apogee Drive II returns to take its place at the helm of Swiftech's CPU waterblock product line and it includes all the latest and greatest technological advancements that we have to offer today" said Gabriel Rouchon Swiftech's Chairman and CTA.

Derived in general concept from the company's Apogee Drive initially released in 2007, the Apogee Drive II much differs from the original in terms of its execution. The original was conceived as a moderate cost unit, using plastic injection molding for its body, the entry-level MCP350 pump and it came with bare essentials. In contrast, the Apogee Drive II is conceived as a luxury vessel: its uses the PWM controlled MCP35X, Swiftech's most powerful pump to date, a precision CNC machined water-block body that lends itself to easy upgrades for future socket form factors, adjustable inlet and outlet ports, a heatsink to further cool the pump, LED illuminated logo in a choice of 3 colors, braided cables, and the company's now famous retention system. The only concession to cost and waste-cutting measure the company made was to not bundle all the retention systems into one SKU, and to make 3 separate product versions.

According to the Company's own benchmarks, the Apogee Drive II edged the current Apogee HD in thermal performance, which is no small feat considering that the HD is currently hovering at the top of the world's performance charts. Given the considerable headroom afforded by the pump, uses for this type of device span across the entire spectrum of the high-end liquid cooling arena, but will particularly please system builders with space-constrained applications. The initial SKU being released is compatible with Intel CPUs using socket LGA 775, 1155 and 1366. Two more versions are expected to be released in June: a version compatible with Intel socket LGA 2011, and one compatible with all current AMD processor sockets.

MSRP
1155/1366 version: $144.95
2011 version: $135.95
AMD version: $138.95

Product Page
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42 Comments on Swiftech Launches the Apogee Drive II CPU Water-Block with Integrated Pump

#1
cadaveca
My name is Dave
radrok said:
Anyway not to be a Koolance fanboy, years ago I would never touch any of their products but today they are almost comparable to Swiftech, their quality has really step up.
I agree.


However, both this block/pump combo, and the ApogeeHD block and rad set, are soemthing else entirely fro mwhat koolance offers IMHO. You very nearly get easy high-end water setups, that are nearly as easy to assemble as the AIO coolers from Corsair, Antec, and the like, while offering functionality no other offers.

I posted about this unit before the news item hit...I've been paying close attention to Swifttech as of late, ebcuase they sure do have some good stuff this year!(Nevermind there's not much else new when it comes to watercooling right now:laugh:).
Posted on Reply
#2
radrok
Yeah, the only new thing about watercooling that has touched us lately is the introduction of Monsoon free center compression fittings and they are damn sexy, thanks again Dave for pointing me to em.

And this pump+highend block combo is a very awesome and welcome piece to the watercooling scene, do you imagine how this will integrate into microATX builds?
People didn't know where to put the res+pump combo because there isn't so much space in those cases, now you can get a clean small build with this.
Posted on Reply
#3
cadaveca
My name is Dave
radrok said:
do you imagine how this will integrate into microATX builds?
;) Now you're thinking. I've kinda been on the ball with watercooling stuff as of late...been a whiel since I bothered with anything more than Corsair AIO units, and if I'm gonna invest the kid of $$$ that a proper setup involves, I want to make sure to be getting the right kit.
Posted on Reply
#4
Wile E
Power User
MT Alex said:
Fair enough. Comparing Swiftech with Koolance is like comparing an Audi with a Yugo, but to each his own.



Considering the 35X is the most powerful mainstream consumer grade pump you can buy - you would have to go with an exorbitantly expensive Eheim or comparable to get better performance - you can put as many rads and blocks with it as you wish. I have 600mm worth of rad with three blocks on mine with tons of power to boot.
Not anymore. Koolance runs with the big dogs now. Just look at reviews for their full coverage GPU blocks, CPU360, and DDC/MCP accessories.
Posted on Reply
#5
MT Alex
Wile E said:
Not anymore. Koolance runs with the big dogs now. Just look at reviews for their full coverage GPU blocks, CPU360, and DDC/MCP accessories.
Point well taken. I don't think, however, that he was referring to any of their revamped parts. For the $200 he mentioned, I pictured the old Koolance top mounted aluminum rad/shroud with integral crappy pump and crappy block, hence my comment.

In case you all were planning on hanging me out the window by my feet:
Alex: All right, all right, I apologize.

Wile E, radrok & Dave: You're really sorry?

Alex: I'm really, really, sorry. I apologize unreservedly.

Wile E, radrok & Dave: You take it back?

Alex: I do, I offer a complete and utter retraction. The imputation was totally without basis in fact, and was in no way fair comment, and was motivated purely by malice. And I deeply regret any distress that my comments may have caused you, or your family, and I hereby undertake not to repeat any such slander at any time in the future.

Wile E, radrok & Dave: Ok.
Posted on Reply
#6
Wile E
Power User
MT Alex said:
Point well taken. I don't think, however, that he was referring to any of their revamped parts. For the $200 he mentioned, I pictured the old Koolance top mounted aluminum rad/shroud with integral crappy pump and crappy block, hence my comment.

In case you all were planning on hanging me out the window by my feet:
lol

And yeah, their old parts were definitely shit.
Posted on Reply
#7
adrianx
the problem it is with the block pomp, more precise with that 2 connectors in form of letter J
Posted on Reply
#8
function69
I'm a noob in water cooling, so the only other part that I will need for this to run is a radiator? And I'll need to pay for it separately? Also, what's the benefit of having the pump on the block vs. the radiator?
Posted on Reply
#9
adrianx
function69 it is simple the space that pomp can take in your case (or outside). the water pressure at sort distance of the pomp is bigger. the pressure will decrees in relation with the length and diameter of the water circuit.

the difference is not a big one at this little pomp.

the bad parts:

-the pomp generate vibrations
-the pomp can get hot
-the pomp connectors are tricky

in this system the connectors of the waterblock ar in L shape. this is the real problem because the connectors down get directly attached to the watterblock. (there are no filet). if you see the pictures there are a sets of screws that kepp the connectors pressed to the waterblock. this is not a good ideea.
Posted on Reply
#10
Sinzia
function69 said:
I'm a noob in water cooling, so the only other part that I will need for this to run is a radiator? And I'll need to pay for it separately? Also, what's the benefit of having the pump on the block vs. the radiator?
This combines two parts of a loop, the cpu block and pump. You'd still need a radiator, tubing, and either a res or T-line, either of which are fine.

adrianx said:
function69 in this system the connectors of the waterblock ar in L shape. this is the real problem because the connectors down get directly attached to the watterblock. (there are no filet). if you see the pictures there are a sets of screws that kepp the connectors pressed to the waterblock. this is not a good ideea.
All quality blocks are held together with screws and bolts, its the low quality ones you can't take apart.
Posted on Reply
#12
sy5tem
adrianx said:
sinzia

see the screws?http://www.swiftech.org/images/products/APD2/ADJUSTABLE.jpg



this is the big problem, that mode keep the connector attached to the waterblock is the problem.

anyone that use water cooling in pc, dont want to stay with an eye on the pomp to see if leaks or not
AHHHHHHHH that screw!...

still this good for a small WC started kit :P
Posted on Reply
#13
Sinzia
adrianx said:
sinzia

see the screws?http://www.swiftech.org/images/products/APD2/ADJUSTABLE.jpg



this is the big problem, that mode keep the connector attached to the waterblock is the problem.

anyone that use water cooling in pc, dont want to stay with an eye on the pomp to see if leaks or not
Its a dual position fitting that's held in with screws. I don't see much of an issue with that, considering EK uses something quite similar for the FC-Bridge SLi/Crossfire manifold.

This is one situation where the user needs to have a bit of common sense and all should be ok.
Posted on Reply
#14
Delta6326
Now to have one on the cpu and mod one to the gpu connect them and you got a sweet wc loop.
Posted on Reply
#15
Sinzia
Delta6326 said:
Now to have one on the cpu and mod one to the gpu connect them and you got a sweet wc loop.
That's a 35x pump on that, it's already good enough to push several GPU blocks, but it would be pretty cool to see them in a "boost pump" kind of setup.
Posted on Reply
#16
Delta6326
Then you can haves them both at low rpms. To make it a quite wc loop.
Posted on Reply
#17
radrok
Delta6326 said:
Then you can haves them both at low rpms. To make it a quite wc loop.
Man I think you don't realize how much powerful is the 35x :D
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