Monday, June 18th 2012

AMD Adopts 28 nm Bulk Manufacturing in 2013

According to AMD senior VP and CTO Mark Papermaster, the company will adopt the 28 nanometer bulk CMOS silicon fabrication process for its chips in 2013. The bulk process is used to manufacture high-volume and less-complex products, such as motherboard chipset, entry-level APUs, etc. The company already takes advantage of TSMC 28 nm High-Performance process for highly-complex chip designs, such as its Southern Islands GPU family, and will continue using it for its next-generation "Sea Islands" GPUs. In related news, DigiTimes learned through sources that AMD's Sea Islands GPUs have entered tape-out stage, and are on course for a late-2012 volume manufacturing, and early-2013 launch schedule.

Source: DigiTimes
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35 Comments on AMD Adopts 28 nm Bulk Manufacturing in 2013

#1
seronx
largon said:
In related news, Intel's latest chips are 65nm. That is, Z77 is 65nm.

Would be nice if the thread title was specified for what use AMD will adopt 28nm.
'Cause there seems to be a lot of people who just read the title and rushed to comment
28-nm is considered a super-process just like 65-nm. Everything will eventually use it.

For now:
CPU
GPU
APU
Future Chipsets

Also, thanks for the showing the southbridge(PCH) specs for the Z77 it is nice to compare it to the southbridge(FCH) from the A85X(Hudson D4)
Posted on Reply
#2
faramir
Assimilator said:
Intel's already got working 22nm parts and will have 14nm process perfected by 2013. Why does AMD keep making press releases that only show how far behind it is?
Intel's 14 nm chips aren't due out until 2014 (which will mostlikely be very late 2014, if I may add).
Posted on Reply
#3
Prima.Vera
cadaveca said:
With a smaller share of the market, it's only natural that they cannot progress as quickly as Intel does, as the dollars for R&D just aren't equal. Expecting similar technology development on an exponentially smaller budget just doesn't seem realistic to me,...
This should be the thing of TSMC, not AMD. AMD is fabless as far as I am aware...So TSMC should r&d in better tech, not AMD imo.
Posted on Reply
#4
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Prima.Vera said:
This should be the thing of TSMC, not AMD. AMD is fabless as far as I am aware...So TSMC should r&d in better tech, not AMD imo.
AMD still has controlling interest in GloFo. They are seperate companies, but what the two do is tightly linked. AMD is GloFo's biggest customer.

And as such, AMD still needs to push GloFo to innovate, however they can, and AMD is already doing so, IMHO. There are perhpas a few details they have missed, but Mark Papermaster is still relatively new, and we won't truly see his effect on the company for another 18 months or so. At least he is outting info and marketing, something AMD has lacked greatly in teh past. Hopefully news like this continues.
Posted on Reply
#5
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
cadaveca said:
AMD still has controlling interest in GloFo.
No, AMD is completely divested in Global Foundries. It's just another client.
Posted on Reply
#6
cadaveca
My name is Dave
btarunr said:
No, AMD is completely divested in Global Foundries. It's just another client.
LoL WHUT!


:roll:



I thought they had to retain that control in order to keep X86 liscence?

They did not retain voting control? I haz big huge confuse..I knew they were selling off some GloFo equity in ?March?
Posted on Reply
#7
theoneandonlymrk
seronx said:
28-nm GlobalFoundries vs 28-nm TSMC vs 22-nm Intel vs 22-nm AMD-IBM Foundry partnership(before GlobalFoundries was sold)
SRAM Cell Size:
GloFo => ~0.120 um²
TSMC => ~0.127 um²
Intel => ~0.092-0.108 um²
AMD-IBM Fishkill => ~0.1 um²

AMD's foundries aren't that far behind... and since Rambus is working with GlobalFoundries to shrink and speed up SRAM Cells we can expect Steamroller to have faster and bigger L1, L2, L3 caches.
all this and much more can be met at 28nm easily, TSV 3d stacked chips are on the way and with them a massive increase in on die cache imho, as in the same space much more can be built, im sure i heard AMD were sniffing around this tech and imho the ps4 and Xbox 7weva are awaiting this tech.
Posted on Reply
#8
seronx
cadaveca said:
I thought they had to retain that control in order to keep X86 license?
Nope, Intel and AMD made a deal in 2009.
theoneandonlymrk said:
TSV 3d stacked chips are on the way and with them a massive increase in on die cache imho
TSV doesn't work on the consumer level.
Posted on Reply
#9
Super XP
Assimilator said:
Intel's already got working 22nm parts and will have 14nm process perfected by 2013. Why does AMD keep making press releases that only show how far behind it is?
Now that is a ?? Statement. Intel is a lot larger than AMD. Something like this, despite it being small is quite big for AMD. And no AMD is not far behind, quite the opposite. AMD’s been leading the PC industry ever since 2004. Where AMD has lead, Intel followed and still follows. Both companies need each other to ensure we get the best possible prices in a fair competitive environment.
btarunr said:
No, AMD is completely divested in Global Foundries. It's just another client.
Agreed, though I believe AMD going fabless was a big mistake IMO.
Posted on Reply
#10
seronx
Super XP said:
Agreed, though I believe AMD going fabless was a big mistake IMO.
There was a lot of things that AMD could have done differently.

1. Let JHH become CEO(with the purchase of Nvidia) <-- if this happened the GPGPU market would be a lot better(No Xeon Phi abomination instead we would have had Intel Southern Islands and AMD Kepler)
2. Kept GlobalFoundries
3. Kept NAND Flash(especially now since everyone else is making them)
4. Allow non-reference chipsets
5. Kept soundcards(personally added their own soundcards instead of Realtek into the boards)
Posted on Reply