Saturday, January 3rd 2015

Acer Announces the XB270HU and XG270HU Gaming Monitors

Acer announces two new gaming monitors with some world first designs. The Acer XB270HU is the world's first NVIDIA G-SYNC gaming monitor equipped with IPS technology, and the Acer XG270HU is the world's first gaming monitor with an edge-to-edge frameless display. Both of these 27-inch displays come with WQHD (2560 x 1440) resolution and a fast 144 Hz refresh rate to enhance in-gaming performance.

The XB270HU is the first NVIDIA G-SYNC-enabled gaming monitor to feature IPS technology, which provides consistently clear images from up to 178 degree wide viewing angles. NVIDIA G-SYNC technology ensures every frame rendered by the GPU is perfectly portrayed by synchronizing the monitor's refresh rates to the GPU in a GeForce GTX-powered PC. This breakthrough technology eliminates screen tearing and minimizes display stutter and input lag to deliver a smooth, fast and dynamic gaming experience for all the latest PC game titles. Scenes appear instantly, objects are visually sharp, and gameplay is more responsive to provide faster reaction times, giving gamers an advantage. Even in multi-monitor setups, the Acer XB270HU delivers crisp images from wide viewing angles to provide an excellent in-game experience. Furthermore, its multi-functional ErgoStand allows users to tilt, swivel and adjust the height to the most comfortable viewing position.
The XG270HU is the world's first gaming monitor with an edge-to-edge frameless display which maximizes viewing area and provides a more seamless viewing experience for multi-monitor setups. A quick 1 ms response time assures that actions or dramatic transitions will be rendered smoothly without smearing or ghosting effects. Built with post-consumer recycled ABS plastic, this monitor adorns the characteristic Acer gaming identity with a bold orange strip along the bottom horizontal frame and also outlines the base stand. For easy connectivity, the XG270HU includes HDMI 2.0, DVI, and DisplayPort 1.2.

To reduce eye strain and potential long-term damage to eye health by heavy users such as gamers and programmers, the XG270HU is built with Acer EyeProtect technologies. This includes flicker-less technology that eliminates screen flicker through a stable supply of power; ComfyView which reduces reflection from light sources on the non-glare panel, low-dimming technology that adjusts screen brightness when working in non-optimal lighting conditions, and a blue light filter to reduce blue light exposure.

Acer has the most comprehensive lineup of gaming monitors on the market with 24-, 27- and 28-inch sizes and across FHD, WQHD and 4K2K UHD resolution displays.

Availability
The Acer XB270HU and XG270HU monitors will be available globally and begin shipping in March 2015.
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26 Comments on Acer Announces the XB270HU and XG270HU Gaming Monitors

#1
DeNeDe
hmm.. IPS and G-sync.. it seems no more TN for us.. :D
IPS has like 5ms response time.
The one with 1ms is still IPS ?
Posted on Reply
#2
Xzibit
DeNeDe said:
hmm.. IPS and G-sync.. it seems no more TN for us.. :D
IPS has like 5ms response time.
The one with 1ms is still IPS ?
It's possible. They just have to overdrive it enough to get response times low. No different then any other panel type. For example the Asus ROG Swift PG278Q averages 12.2ms @ 60hz & 6.9ms @ 144hz before being overdriven.
Posted on Reply
#3
GhostRyder
Wow this is quite nice as I am sure many people are going to squeal at the thought of these monitors.

The frameless one is the one to peak my interest.
Posted on Reply
#4
Eroticus
Xzibit said:
It's possible. They just have to overdrive it enough to get response times low. No different then any other panel type. For example the Asus ROG Swift PG278Q averages 12.2ms @ 60hz & 6.9ms @ 144hz before being overdriven.
PG278Q is usual Samsung TN Panel (old 8bit) and not IPS.
Posted on Reply
#6
utengineer
I bought the ROG Swift and compared it to various IPS monitors (@ local Fry's). I felt like you really have to be staring at 4k static images to notice much of a difference...based upon real observations. I realize there are major benefits to wide viewing angles for IPS, but the colors and definition in gaming were identical. I feel with dynamic visual applications like video games, the true game changer, to me, is the lower response time and higher refresh rates. I feel the GSYNC and 144Hz capabilities of these monitors can overcome higher response times, visually, and make these an attractive buy. Yet, I am a FPS gamer, so the ROG Swift Crosshair button is honestly the thing that makes me feel like I got 800 dollars worth of "gaming" technology.
Posted on Reply
#7
Xzibit
utengineer said:
I bought the ROG Swift and compared it to various IPS monitors (@ local Fry's). I felt like you really have to be staring at 4k static images to notice much of a difference...based upon real observations. I realize there are major benefits to wide viewing angles for IPS, but the colors and definition in gaming were identical. I feel with dynamic visual applications like video games, the true game changer, to me, is the lower response time and higher refresh rates. I feel the GSYNC and 144Hz capabilities of these monitors can overcome higher response times, visually, and make these an attractive buy. Yet, I am a FPS gamer, so the ROG Swift Crosshair button is honestly the thing that makes me feel like I got 800 dollars worth of "gaming" technology.
I wouldn't do that.

1.) Fry's or any Brick and mortar store doesn't calibrate their screens before putting them on display that I know of.
2.) Factory default settings can make a good screen not look as good as it should.
3.) People messing with the settings. Buttons are made to be pushed.

Probably to get a general idea of a monitor yes but head-to-head I wouldn't recommend it.
Posted on Reply
#8
silapakorn
Wow, that's something I always wanted: 1440p, Gsync, 144hz, and IPS.
Too bad it's Acer.
Posted on Reply
#9
daftkoi
silapakorn said:
Wow, that's something I always wanted: 1440p, Gsync, 144hz, and IPS.
Too bad it's Acer.
Yeah I was excited until I realized it's Acer. Given ASUS had so many issues with their ROG swift, you might have more success with a overclocked korean panel.
Posted on Reply
#10
Prima.Vera
What's wrong with Acer??

Also are those panels glossy or not? A matte boring panel is crap for gaming imo.
Posted on Reply
#11
Assimilator
Prima.Vera said:
What's wrong with Acer??
This. I have an Acer P243W that I purchased over half a decade ago and it's still going strong. It also has a higher resolution (1920x1200) than 90% of the monitors on the market.
Posted on Reply
#12
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Prima.Vera said:
What's wrong with Acer??
Assimilator said:
This. I have an Acer P243W that I purchased over half a decade ago and it's still going strong. It also has a higher resolution (1920x1200) than 90% of the monitors on the market.
Have you ever done an RMA through Acer? It's not that Acer makes bad products (they are a little bit on the cheap side), it's when they do make a bad product it's a headache to replace.
Prima.Vera said:
Also are those panels glossy or not? A mat boring panel is crap for gaming imo.
I feel that matte finishes blur pixels together. So regardless of what you're doing, glossy will look better quality wise. Finish makes a huge impact on IQ imho.
Posted on Reply
#13
THE_EGG
Daaaaayummmm 144hz, 1440p panel, G-Sync AND an IPS panel. Sooooooo damn tempting. Hopefully it won't be too expensive knowing Acer's monitors.
Posted on Reply
#14
BorisDG
IPS ... but it's some cheap IPS panel - meh.
Posted on Reply
#15
Disparia
Cool. Acer has been a good go-to value brand in the past. Purchased about 40 monitors and their small form desktops for the office and know several people with their laptops.
Posted on Reply
#16
Live OR Die
utengineer said:
I bought the ROG Swift and compared it to various IPS monitors (@ local Fry's). I felt like you really have to be staring at 4k static images to notice much of a difference...based upon real observations. I realize there are major benefits to wide viewing angles for IPS, but the colors and definition in gaming were identical. I feel with dynamic visual applications like video games, the true game changer, to me, is the lower response time and higher refresh rates. I feel the GSYNC and 144Hz capabilities of these monitors can overcome higher response times, visually, and make these an attractive buy. Yet, I am a FPS gamer, so the ROG Swift Crosshair button is honestly the thing that makes me feel like I got 800 dollars worth of "gaming" technology.
I have a ROG swift and a Samsung IPS WQHD which i got a few years ago and the IPS looks heaps better overall in every think i use IPS is easier to read and the colors are more bright, I will be upgrading to a G-Sync IPS when the time comes.
Posted on Reply
#17
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Live OR Die said:
I have a ROG swift and a Samsung IPS WQHD which i got a few years ago and the IPS looks heaps better overall in every think i use IPS is easier to read and the colors are more bright, I will be upgrading to a G-Sync IPS when the time comes.
I've yet to find any TN panel than can get remotely close to the quality and color reproduction of an IPS panel. Granted, I don't game as much as I used to so I prefer good color and good picture as opposed to smoothness in motion. That's what the plasma is for. :p
Posted on Reply
#18
Xzibit
THE_EGG said:
Daaaaayummmm 144hz, 1440p panel, G-Sync AND an IPS panel. Sooooooo damn tempting. Hopefully it won't be too expensive knowing Acer's monitors.
Acers TN 1080p G-Sync goes for $599. If lucky this one will be around $799 and replace the ROG but that's also TN. A premium for IPS 1440p @ 144hz it might get up to +$999.

Good news is its slated for March time frame when Samsungs IPS "FreeSync" are also said to be release and could drive cost down for Dynamic Refresh monitors.
Posted on Reply
#19
ZoneDymo
Assimilator said:
This. I have an Acer P243W that I purchased over half a decade ago and it's still going strong. It also has a higher resolution (1920x1200) than 90% of the monitors on the market.
get an old 20inch crt and you will do 2048x1536@80hz yo
Posted on Reply
#20
silapakorn
Aquinus said:
I've yet to find any TN panel than can get remotely close to the quality and color reproduction of an IPS panel. Granted, I don't game as much as I used to so I prefer good color and good picture as opposed to smoothness in motion. That's what the plasma is for. :p
My Samsung S27A750d, which is a TN, can produce 'more vibrant' color than an IPS.

This is to show you an idea: IPS = left, TN = right



Note*
1. Color on Samsung can always be brought down in setting menu, if you prefer a realistic tone. This image is only to show you that TN can go more vivid.
2. This is not my own image, for more info, visit http://www.overclock.net/t/1167576/tn-vs-ips-response-rate-picture-quality/10#post_15716137

I've been using it for almost 3 years, and it's the best of both worlds: 120hz, superb response time, and very nice color vibrancy. The only downside is that it's too damn expensive, because it carries Samsung's own 3D technology (which is not compatible with Nvidia 3D.)
Posted on Reply
#21
Xzibit
silapakorn said:
My Samsung S27A750d, which is a TN, can produce 'more vibrant' color than an IPS.

This is to show you an idea: IPS = left, TN = right



Note*
1. Color on Samsung can always be brought down in setting menu, if you prefer a realistic tone. This image is only to show you that TN can go more vivid.
2. This is not my own image, for more info, visit http://www.overclock.net/t/1167576/tn-vs-ips-response-rate-picture-quality/10#post_15716137

I've been using it for almost 3 years, and it's the best of both worlds: 120hz, superb response time, and very nice color vibrancy. The only downside is that it's too damn expensive, because it carries Samsung's own 3D technology (which is not compatible with Nvidia 3D.)
He doesn't provide a source image so how is anyone suppose to know how the picture is suppose to look like in the first place? The rest of the thread goes as expected.
Posted on Reply
#22
silapakorn
Xzibit said:
He doesn't provide a source image so how is anyone suppose to know how the picture is suppose to look like in the first place? The rest of the thread goes as expected.
That seems irrelevant to me. I just wanted to point out that the color setting on TN can be adjusted and can become more vivid if you want it to be.
But people nowadays often say things implying that TN monitors will always have worse color no matter what, which is not entirely true.
Posted on Reply
#23
Prima.Vera
For TN is all about the viewing angles, and also the color banding (which is really really annoying and distracting) you get in movies/games because of the cheap 8bit panels.
Personally, I prefer S-PVA 10bit panels, which are cheaper than IPS, but with the response time of TNs. I don't know why nobody is producing those anymore.
Posted on Reply
#24
Live OR Die
silapakorn said:
My Samsung S27A750d, which is a TN, can produce 'more vibrant' color than an IPS.

This is to show you an idea: IPS = left, TN = right


Note*
1. Color on Samsung can always be brought down in setting menu, if you prefer a realistic tone. This image is only to show you that TN can go more vivid.
2. This is not my own image, for more info, visit http://www.overclock.net/t/1167576/tn-vs-ips-response-rate-picture-quality/10#post_15716137

I've been using it for almost 3 years, and it's the best of both worlds: 120hz, superb response time, and very nice color vibrancy. The only downside is that it's too damn expensive, because it carries Samsung's own 3D technology (which is not compatible with Nvidia 3D.)
Mine isn't IPS its PLS which is petty much the same.

I can tell you now i use my screens for programming as well and the PLS was a lot easier to read its just a clearer screen over all.

ROG SWIFT PG278Q TN


Samsung S27B970 PLS
Posted on Reply
#25
Prima.Vera
How much for this XB270HU I wonder...?
Posted on Reply
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