Tuesday, March 24th 2015

Intel to Launch Just Two LGA1150 "Broadwell" Parts

In what could be a sign of Intel being stuck with "undigested" Core "Haswell" inventories, BGA chips becoming commonplace for desktop platforms that don't see CPU upgrades, or even "Broadwell" being too short a stopgap between "Haswell" and "Skylake," the company has reportedly decided to launch just two socket LGA1150 Core "Broadwell" parts, when the silicon hits the market towards June.

Built in the 14 nm silicon fab process, "Broadwell" will bring about performance/Watt increments, and Intel doesn't appear to be in the mood to trade those in for higher clock speeds (higher performance out of the box). It's relevant to note here, that the "Broadwell" core is essentially an optical shrink of the "Haswell" CPU architecture to 14 nm, much like "Ivy Bridge" was to "Sandy Bridge," even if the silicon seating the cores itself is much different (meatier iGPU). Intel will be going in with just two parts, both of which are unlocked, for PC enthusiasts to chew on. These include the Core i7-5775C and the Core i5-5675C.
Both the i7-5775C and the i5-5675C are quad-core parts, with TDP rated as low as 65W. The i7-5775C offers clock speeds of 3.30 GHz, with 3.70 GHz Turbo Boost, while the i5-5675C offers 3.10 GHz, with 3.60 GHz Turbo Boost. The i7-5775C comes with just 6 MB of L3 cache, while the i5-5675C offers just 4 MB of it. The i7-5775C offers HyperThreading, letting the OS address eight logical CPUs, while the i5-5675C lacks it. Both chips feature Intel's Iris Pro 6200 series integrated graphics, and feature dual-channel DDR3L-1600 memory support. It will be interesting to see how the two compare to the existing i7-4790K and i5-4690K, although something tells us that they're not comparable. The two will be compatible with existing LGA1150 motherboards, with BIOS updates. Source: VR-Zone
Add your own comment

53 Comments on Intel to Launch Just Two LGA1150 "Broadwell" Parts

#1
Caring1
Not bad if you want lower power usage.
Posted on Reply
#2
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
I would be very interested to see how Iris Pro performance scales on an unlocked CPU. Until now Iris Pro has only really been in embedded CPUs and typically aren't overclockable. I have a feeling that these could be fun CPUs to play with even without a discrete GPU. Not to say that Iris Pro is a solution to discrete, just that it would be fun to play with to see what it could do. I'm definitely interested in this and I have my eye on it. While I like my i7 3820, it's a lot of power for a workstation and it may be finding its way into a server role.
Posted on Reply
#3
BorisDG
Yes. It will fit nicely in my HTPC, replacing the Pentium K. Only "downgrade" vs Haswell is the fewer cache. Hope it's with liquid metal and it's not hot like previous generation.
Posted on Reply
#4
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
BorisDG
Only "downgrade" vs Haswell is the fewer cache.
True, but remember that Iris Pro provides a eDRAM cache for the iGPU like on previous CPUs with Iris Pro which used a 128MB eDRAM last level cache. So in reality, there are extra things that weren't there before, so not all is lost IMHO.
Posted on Reply
#5
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Aquinus
True, but remember that Iris Pro provides a eDRAM cache for the iGPU like on previous CPUs with Iris Pro which used a 128MB eDRAM last level cache. So in reality, there are extra things that weren't there before, so not all is lost IMHO.
eDRAM cache is only on GT3 silicon, which only comes in BGA package, not LGA1150.
Posted on Reply
#6
Ed_1
btarunr
eDRAM cache is only on GT3 silicon, which only comes in BGA package, not LGA1150.
It being reported to have e-cache to, that is why the L2 is smaller compared to 4590/4790 , they needed to make room for the Iris Pro 6200 e-cache .
Posted on Reply
#7
buggalugs
Weird. I guess they don't want to be stuck with a bunch of broadwell stock when Skylake comes out with an entirely new platform.
Posted on Reply
#8
TheGuruStud
They're going to be stuck with a lot of everything when people finally realize that skylake is the same thing, too lol

It's in the roadmaps. Why do people think it'll be upgrade worthy?
Posted on Reply
#9
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
TheGuruStud
Why do people think it'll be upgrade worthy?
Skylake for DDR4 and NVME. Broadwell, bugger all worthy on that chestnut. They know it too.
Posted on Reply
#10
TheGuruStud
RCoon
Skylake for DDR4 and NVME. Broadwell, bugger all worthy on that chestnut. They know it too.
I can't wait for that 1.5% perf increase that likely comes with terrible overclocking. They're still using bulk crap, right? Plus, smaller process means less insulation. Leakage monster past stock.

Looks like sandy/ivy systems will live until they actually die.
Posted on Reply
#11
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
TheGuruStud
I can't wait for that 1.5% perf increase that likely comes with terrible overclocking.
1.5%, please, at least 2%. Engineering samples sucked horribly anyway, seems the smaller the node process the worse the clock speed they get out of it. I'm sure production chips will be a lot better than the high 2.8Ghz speeds, still, I don't expect any overclocking marvels to come from them. They'll carry on using sucky TIM. Skylake is marginally useful, decent iGPU, NVME for the big baller SSD's, DDR4 not so useful, not many benefits besides minor details.
Posted on Reply
#12
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Aquinus
I would be very interested to see how Iris Pro performance scales on an unlocked CPU. Until now Iris Pro has only really been in embedded CPUs and typically aren't overclockable. I have a feeling that these could be fun CPUs to play with even without a discrete GPU. Not to say that Iris Pro is a solution to discrete, just that it would be fun to play with to see what it could do. I'm definitely interested in this and I have my eye on it. While I like my i7 3820, it's a lot of power for a workstation and it may be finding its way into a server role.
What does it matter? These are, by Intel's own admission, just for the enthusiasts. We don't use integrated graphics. So dumping more performance into the iGPU at the expense of CPU performance doesn't make sense.
Posted on Reply
#13
Petey Plane
TheGuruStud
I can't wait for that 1.5% perf increase that likely comes with terrible overclocking. They're still using bulk crap, right? Plus, smaller process means less insulation. Leakage monster past stock.

Looks like sandy/ivy systems will live until they actually die.
Yeah, still see no reason to upgrade from my 2500K. Probably will look at Skylake, with mainstream DDR4 support, but may even wait for the 10nm "Tick" of that. There is pretty much nothing a 4.6ghz 2500k can't currently handle with ease.
Posted on Reply
#14
Ed_1
How do you know Skylake will only be 1.5% or very low single thread performance increase .
I haven't seen any leaks yet
Posted on Reply
#15
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
TheGuruStud
Looks like sandy/ivy systems will live until they actually die.
totally agreed,
i think my Ivy its gona last 3 years more,

About broadwell, IHS will be soldered, not glued like the crap work they did with Ivy's and Haswell?

Regards,
Posted on Reply
#16
Disparia
newtekie1
What does it matter? These are, by Intel's own admission, just for the enthusiasts. We don't use integrated graphics. So dumping more performance into the iGPU at the expense of CPU performance doesn't make sense.
If you quote Intel then shouldn't you also use Intel's definition of an enthusiast? Intel in the past has demonstrated the capabilities of the Iris Pro with it's OpenCL support, often referencing the possibilities available to professionals as well as enthusiasts. They've also on plenty of occasions made the connection of overclocker = enthusiast. Aquinus is interested in the total (CPU+GPU) overclocking potential of Broadwell so as far as Intel is concerned, he is an enthusiast.
Posted on Reply
#17
GhostRyder
newtekie1
What does it matter? These are, by Intel's own admission, just for the enthusiasts. We don't use integrated graphics. So dumping more performance into the iGPU at the expense of CPU performance doesn't make sense.
Good point, I was thinking a similar thing as the iGPU on these unlocked processors means nothing since most of the people looking at them are probably pairing them up with a GPU of some sort.

Would love to see these and I am glad they are at least releasing something. I think the new naming convention is interesting as well.
Posted on Reply
#18
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
Still gonna rock my 2600K until I see something good out of Skylake, if there is something good....
Posted on Reply
#19
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
Such a yawnworthy product launch from Intel this time round, but I can see why they did it. I'd only buy this if building a new system for someone and they needed it right now.

I'm sure Skylake will be properly exciting and bring about some real performance and feature improvements making it worth my time to upgrade from my trusty 2700K which has served me really well for over 3 years now.

Would be nice to see an overclock to 6GHz+ from it on air...
Posted on Reply
#20
happita
RCoon
1.5%, please, at least 2%. Engineering samples sucked horribly anyway, seems the smaller the node process the worse the clock speed they get out of it. I'm sure production chips will be a lot better than the high 2.8Ghz speeds, still, I don't expect any overclocking marvels to come from them. They'll carry on using sucky TIM. Skylake is marginally useful, decent iGPU, NVME for the big baller SSD's, DDR4 not so useful, not many benefits besides minor details.
I was actually thinking of upgrading to a Broadwell, but with Skylake so close, why bother. I'm confused, is NVME the SATA Express you are referring to? I think all these little tidbit features along with new architecture/process node would benefit people of the 2500k and lower CPU power. Anything above it STILL wouldn't make sense being as like someone else said, an overclocked 2500k can still pretty much handle anything nowadays.
Posted on Reply
#21
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
qubit
Would be nice to see an overclock to 6GHz+ from it on air...
nice? that will be like a dream :D


happita
someone else said, an overclocked 2500k can still pretty much handle anything nowadays.
so if a brave i5 can handle just imagine what an i7 of sandy and Ivy can do?

Is not worth enough to replace your current Sandy or Ivy Bridge unit for a broadwell one, mostly on gaming an OCed i5 2500K can handle all what you will do with a new processor, we recommend people o buy haswell for new builds because availability and also opportunity, prices between brand new sandies, ivys and haswell are not so big, so for a couple of dollars more getting recent units is a solid unit.

Also for work and light work the old intel Core 2 Quad are brave units, I have a previous gen Intel i7 for work and hard work, also it is crunching too, so we can add Lynnfield to our veterans list,

Lynnfield, Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge are brave enough for a couple of years more of gaming, working and whatever you want,
Posted on Reply
#22
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
it is becoming clear that intel is going to push and push its tech to the point that they can fit a full powered i7 desktop chip on silicon that will fit a mobile device. pretty impressive.
Posted on Reply
#23
Petey Plane
Jizzler
If you quote Intel then shouldn't you also use Intel's definition of an enthusiast? Intel in the past has demonstrated the capabilities of the Iris Pro with it's OpenCL support, often referencing the possibilities available to professionals as well as enthusiasts. They've also on plenty of occasions made the connection of overclocker = enthusiast. Aquinus is interested in the total (CPU+GPU) overclocking potential of Broadwell so as far as Intel is concerned, he is an enthusiast.
Enthusiast is a loaded term. I think it helps to remember that computers solely using Intel Integrated Graphics represent the vast majority of Steam users.
Posted on Reply
#24
sumludus
I think these chips may be priced much lower than their Haswell counterparts. Intel hates going backwards, and compared to Devil's Canyon these chips are very underwhelming on paper. Yes it's nice to see Iris Pro on an unlocked chip. But the TDP going down so much says every ounce of wiggle room they got from the process shrink went towards performance/watt, not performance/clock. Add to the fact that the chips are clocked so low, and you end up with the top tier I7 Broadwell being less capable than the original Haswell 4670k in tasks that don't use hyperthreading.

The whole point of LGA Broadwell chips was to give an upgrade path to people already invested in Haswell. Anyone sitting on Haswell K has no reason to consider Broadwell. That makes me think these chips will be going after people who brought the anniversary Pentium chip. They've got value oriented overclocking boards designed for the 53 watt monster, so a 65 watt upgrade should be a drop in replacement. And since that chip and the motherboards they're in are on the lower end of the price spectrum, these chips should continue that trend. They should be the lowest priced unlocked I5 and I7 chips Intel has put out, and be very price competitive with the low end of the Haswell I5 and I7 spectrum ($200 and $300 respectively)
Posted on Reply
#25
Petey Plane
peche
nice? that will be like a dream :D



so if a brave i5 can handle just imagine what an i7 of sandy and Ivy can do?

Is not worth enough to replace your current Sandy or Ivy Bridge unit for a broadwell one, mostly on gaming an OCed i5 2500K can handle all what you will do with a new processor, we recommend people o buy haswell for new builds because availability and also opportunity, prices between brand new sandies, ivys and haswell are not so big, so for a couple of dollars more getting recent units is a solid unit.

Also for work and light work the old intel Core 2 Quad are brave units, I have a previous gen Intel i7 for work and hard work, also it is crunching too, so we can add Lynnfield to our veterans list,

Lynnfield, Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge are brave enough for a couple of years more of gaming, working and whatever you want,
I was the original "OCed 2500k can handle anything" poster. Nothing i currently use my PC for (Battlefield 4/Hardline, Rome: Total War 2, GIMP) is bottlenecked by the 2500k (especially at 4.6ghz, on air) at 1080p. 2500K... great CPU... or greatest CPU?

the GTX670 on the other hand? Yep, once the Freesync/G-Sync 1440 monitors drop below $500, that will get replaced.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment