Tuesday, September 22nd 2015

Super Talent Unveils its Single Rank 4GB DDR4 Modules

Super Talent Technology, a leading manufacturer of NAND Flash storage solutions, announces its very low profile single rank DDR4 4GB ECC 2133 Mhz UDIMM modules. Super Talents single rank 4GB DDR4 ECC UDIMMs target environments where space is vital and low clearance modules are required. Small form factor PCs can take advantage of the extra space saved with these parts. Fewer raw materials are used and less waste is produced without any tradeoffs in functionality or price with these modules.

Very Low Profile form factor DIMMS were developed with the arrival of blade servers. Due to having limited space, standard height modules were unable to fit in the enclosures. Improved airflow, reduced thermal impact, and lowered power costs are all advantages when selecting VLP DIMMs. All modules are quality tested in house and are built to JEDEC standard specifications with high quality components. DDR4 offers modules up to double the density and speed of previous generations DDR3 DRAM while using up to 20% less power which makes it a highly efficient solution for enterprise workloads.
Additional information on Super Talents VLP 4GB DDR4 modules can be found here.
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8 Comments on Super Talent Unveils its Single Rank 4GB DDR4 Modules

#1
deemon
Small form factor PCs can take advantage of the extra space saved with these parts. Fewer raw materials are used and less waste is produced without any tradeoffs in functionality or price with these modules.
If you are talking about normal PC-s, they can not use ECC memory, so no, small form factor PC-s can not take advantage of this really (unless you use Gigabyte boards (like GA-Z170N-WIFI ), that have support for ECC UDIMM 1Rx8/2Rx8 memory modules (but operate in non-ECC mode)). Also 4GB module is extremely small these days, so I don't really see the point of them being used in average servers.
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#2
Ferrum Master
deemon, post: 3348504, member: 156683"
If you are talking about normal PC-s, they can not use ECC memory, so no, small form factor PC-s can not take advantage of this really (unless you use Gigabyte boards (like GA-Z170N-WIFI ), that have support for ECC UDIMM 1Rx8/2Rx8 memory modules (but operate in non-ECC mode)). Also 4GB module is extremely small these days, so I don't really see the point of them being used in average servers.
Take an itx X99 and any Xeon and use it... Where's the problem? Since when X99 is not a normal PC?
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#3
deemon
Ferrum Master, post: 3348523, member: 90058"
Take an itx X99 and any Xeon and use it... Where's the problem? Since when X99 is not a normal PC?
Xeon is not.
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#4
Ferrum Master
deemon, post: 3348528, member: 156683"
Xeon is not.
You will be surprised, that THERE IS ZERO difference in between them who buy low speed efficient and locked stones... including Apple products, also OEM makers like HP Z series... and etc who ain't lazy to assemble an any PC what's available in the store. They are as mainstream as they can be...

There are actually LGA 1150 Haswell Xeon's E3 with ECC support too... they cost the same as i7... and are available in any average retail store actually... as they are not meant for for server products at all as they are not capable of working in multi socket boards... so what's the point of them actually? Eh? Ain't it the mainstream desktop market?
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#5
deemon
Ferrum Master, post: 3348548, member: 90058"
Ain't it the mainstream desktop market?
No. They are server and/or workstation CPU-s. Just because they are cheap and do not have all the bells and whistles more expensive Xeons have, does not make them "mainstream desktop" or "normal PC" products. Yes ofc you can use them for that purpose also and they are probably not much worse at that either, just that they are not meant for that.
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#6
Ferrum Master
deemon, post: 3348602, member: 156683"
No. They are server and/or workstation CPU-s. Just because they are cheap and do not have all the bells and whistles more expensive Xeons have, does not make them "mainstream desktop" products. Yes ofc you can use them for that purpose also and they are probably not much worse at that either, just that they are not meant for that.
I guess you don't understand what really server and workstation is... we all do have workstation actually, especially those who use their PC for job and what actually what Mac Pro as product is... they have more specific segment names. If you can tell what a generic mainstream PC really IS, okay... get into vision of calling ARM your cellphone also a generic mainstream PC for specific needs, and you will be right!

LGA1155 is not a server product, it has zero features for that and is marketed as desktop mainstream segment along i5 and i7. A Xeon E3 CPU... ie plain Haswell i7 won't turn it into a Server... It even does not have a multi socket board nor capability. It just can't be used otherwise... because intel wished for it actually and positioned them price wise in the list. The CPU itself is not the deciding factor what it actually is, but the whole platform. If one does a job or a hobby that triggers a need for such ram... here you have it in your mainstream board. And there for the RAM makers also offer such products. They usually lack certification needed for real large servers utilizing very large ram quantities.

Intel have split the generic PC types basing user habits... core count, energy efficiency, advanced features [VM], ir high frequency... that's what the user habits are. If he seeks a lots of stable RAM, he needs a entry/basic workstation or something that mimics that. So intel offers us Xeon and i7, they overlap. If the user wants less heat, saving electricity, he will take Xeon as a plain buyer... I guess everyone chooses their car and don't complain that he failed too have a diesel engine instead of a petrol engine. Don't make the average user a dumb idiot, they are not, especially those who cling for a custom PC.

Mainstream desktop is everything you can get actually. And your comment about not using ECC in average servers says - you ain't an experienced one. Then those are simple desktops, running server software... I do not want to see a single business person, on whom server the no matter how large the business is, but the money accounts there... failing not on the ram exactly most usually, but slot socket problems, heat, random collisions, that are immediately reported to the OS kernel, from the ECC IC. RAM issues usually make such a OS mess afterwards, that a day is lost, you have to bring the backup image, and it costs more than a proper entry small business server... If you recommend to do so, well... immature, wait on being sued. I have lived with ECC rams for years actually and know the benefits of them.

So in the end.. THE PRICE is the thing that dictates what is mainstream or not... it could be Xeon or this ECC RAM or whatever what... so good luck.
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#7
deemon
Ferrum Master, post: 3348731, member: 90058"
I guess you don't understand what really server and workstation is... we all do have workstation actually, especially those who use their PC for job and what actually what Mac Pro as product is... they have more specific segment names. If you can tell what a generic mainstream PC really IS, okay... get into vision of calling ARM your cellphone also a generic mainstream PC for specific needs, and you will be right!

LGA1155 is not a server product, it has zero features for that and is marketed as desktop mainstream segment along i5 and i7. A Xeon E3 CPU... ie plain Haswell i7 won't turn it into a Server... It even does not have a multi socket board nor capability. It just can't be used otherwise... because intel wished for it actually and positioned them price wise in the list. The CPU itself is not the deciding factor what it actually is, but the whole platform. If one does a job or a hobby that triggers a need for such ram... here you have it in your mainstream board. And there for the RAM makers also offer such products. They usually lack certification needed for real large servers utilizing very large ram quantities.

Intel have split the generic PC types basing user habits... core count, energy efficiency, advanced features [VM], ir high frequency... that's what the user habits are. If he seeks a lots of stable RAM, he needs a entry/basic workstation or something that mimics that. So intel offers us Xeon and i7, they overlap. If the user wants less heat, saving electricity, he will take Xeon as a plain buyer... I guess everyone chooses their car and don't complain that he failed too have a diesel engine instead of a petrol engine. Don't make the average user a dumb idiot, they are not, especially those who cling for a custom PC.

Mainstream desktop is everything you can get actually. And your comment about not using ECC in average servers says - you ain't an experienced one. Then those are simple desktops, running server software... I do not want to see a single business person, on whom server the no matter how large the business is, but the money accounts there... failing not on the ram exactly most usually, but slot socket problems, heat, random collisions, that are immediately reported to the OS kernel, from the ECC IC. RAM issues usually make such a OS mess afterwards, that a day is lost, you have to bring the backup image, and it costs more than a proper entry small business server... If you recommend to do so, well... immature, wait on being sued. I have lived with ECC rams for years actually and know the benefits of them.

So in the end.. THE PRICE is the thing that dictates what is mainstream or not... it could be Xeon or this ECC RAM or whatever what... so good luck.
Whatever man, believe what you want :-)
Like that Humvee is "mainstream car" and Parinya Charoenphol is "mainstream woman" and Conchita Wurst is "mainstream man" and for all I care you can call your iPhone also "mainstream desktop" or whatever. I give up on you.
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#8
Patriot
Typical... those without knowledge speak first...

You can use ECC UDIMMS on systems even if they don't support ECC.... they will just ignore it.
Registered/buffered is a different story.

Asrock makes some beautiful X99 boards with Reg support. :)
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