Wednesday, April 27th 2016

Seagate Now Shipping 10 TB Helium Enterprise Drive In Volume

Seagate Technology plc, a world leader in storage solutions, today announced it is now shipping in volume its 10 TB helium enterprise drives - the Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD. Engineered to meet the storage needs of top cloud service providers, the Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD features the industry's lowest power and weight for maximum space efficiency at the lowest energy usage - lowering the overall total cost of ownership (TCO) of today's large scale data centers. Currently the highest capacity drives available worldwide, these innovative new products are now available to purchase direct from global distributors.

"Seagate has the most comprehensive Nearline portfolio in the industry. Each of our Nearline products - including our new flagship 10 TB helium enterprise drive shipping today - is designed to help customers take maximum advantage of top technology trends that have the highest impact on their business," said Mark Re, CTO at Seagate. "While we offer a number of impressive technology advantages, at the end of the day customers really want solutions and insights that help them better leverage the value of their data so they can offer services and capabilities unmatched by their competitors. Seagate's 10TB helium drive is designed with these market mandates front of mind."
"Seagate is once again at the forefront of innovation with our Nearline portfolio. Our new 10 TB drive boasts advanced write caching capabilities for better performance and the lowest weight and the best energy efficiency in the industry - making this new drive is a real game changer," said John Morris, vice president of enterprise products at Seagate. "Now shipping in volume to our global strategic customers like Ciara and Supermicro, we are pleased to bring this drive to market with the knowledge that it provides highly-valued and unprecedented performance for our customers' hyperscale solutions."

Announced in January in conjunction with partners Huawei and Alibaba, the Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD improves performance by using advanced caching algorithms to help cloud data center managers manage the increasing volume of data more quickly. Featuring Seagate PowerChoice technology, the drive helps businesses manage and reduce the ongoing costs associated with power and cooling during idle time, while Seagate's PowerBalance feature helps optimize the IOPS/Watt for even greater efficiency.

"Seagate's 10 TB Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD expands Supermicro's hyperscale server and storage solutions optimized for cloud solution providers. With Supermicro's 4U 60/90 3.5" top-load hot-swap bay server and single expander JBOD storage solutions, Seagate helium-based high capacity drives provide a robust foundation for building OpenStack cloud infrastructure, delivering maximum performance, scalability and capacity density at the lowest overall TCO," said Don Clegg, vice president of marketing and business development at Supermicro.

"Reliability and performance in a storage solution are key criteria for Ciara's cloud initiative. Seagate's new helium-based 10 TB Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD meets and exceeds both of these criteria," said Darcy Letemplier, vice president of engineering, at Ciara. "Our partnership is a natural choice because of our combined intimate knowledge of the storage industry and a thorough understanding of cloud service providers' needs."

For more information on the new 10 TB helium Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD and all Seagate products please visit www.seagate.com.
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21 Comments on Seagate Now Shipping 10 TB Helium Enterprise Drive In Volume

#1
Fx
WD needs to hurry up and out a WD Red 10TB.
Posted on Reply
#2
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
So this is what is raising concerns of a helium shortage. :(

Are these ever going to come down to reasonable prices or is the cost of manufacturing so high that they'll forever be enterprise drives?
Posted on Reply
#3
Fx
FordGT90Concept
So this is what is raising concerns of a helium shortage. :(

Are these ever going to come down to reasonable prices or is the cost of manufacturing so high that they'll forever be enterprise drives?
I forget where it was, but I read that the shortage of helium were misguided concerns.

The prices should come down. For WD, starting with the 8TB, they have included their HelioSeal technology in drives like Reds which are consumer. The technology started out in their enterprise line within their HGST produced drives. This is why I wish for them to kick out 10TB Reds; it will bring the cost down, and I don't trust Seagate.
Posted on Reply
#4
Solaris17
Dainty Moderator
FordGT90Concept
So this is what is raising concerns of a helium shortage. :(

Are these ever going to come down to reasonable prices or is the cost of manufacturing so high that they'll forever be enterprise drives?
Pretty sure the helium storage has nothing to do with seagate or hitachi HDDs
Posted on Reply
#6
natr0n
When the drive dies the helium takes it to heaven.
Posted on Reply
#7
TheGuruStud
Fx
I forget where it was, but I read that the shortage of helium were misguided concerns.
That's absolutely false. Helium is finite and they were selling it all off at wholesale price. This is a travesty. It's being wasted on balloons and hard drives. What a joke.

Have fun without MRIs in the future. Forget precise instrumentation and scientific research. We don't need to make microchips, either. Scientists don't have the funding to buy it as they need, now, since prices shot up.

Until these theorized, giant resources are found deep in the ground, you can't expend all our current stockpiles with impunity unless you just don't care (and we know politicians just don't care).
Posted on Reply
#8
Fx
TheGuruStud
That's absolutely false. Helium is finite and they were selling it all off at wholesale price. This is a travesty. It's being wasted on balloons and hard drives. What a joke.
That is the general thought, but these scientists seem to disagree:

www.gizmag.com/helium-source-natural-gas-fields/39038/
Posted on Reply
#10
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Should just ban helium balloons for entertainment purposes. The gas is better used in HDDs where it won't escape over a few days.
Posted on Reply
#11
Prima.Vera
Fx
...This is why I wish for them to kick out 10TB Reds; it will bring the cost down, and I don't trust Seagate.
I don't trust ANY HDD drive around this capacity. Period. :)
FordGT90Concept
So this is what is raising concerns of a helium shortage. :(
Helium shortage?? This is so funny since as far as I know, Helium is the 2nd most abundant of the whole fricking UNIVERSE!!! :))))))))
Posted on Reply
#13
Fx
Prima.Vera
I don't trust ANY HDD drive around this capacity. Period. :)
I don't either. I don't use any less than RAID 1, 6 and 10.
Posted on Reply
#14
Breit
Wow, thats a lot of text for literally no info. Does that drive have PMR or is it SMR?
I guess it's the latter, but it's not mentioned. They probably needed to make the announcement short, so no room for these kind of information... :rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#15
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Everything has been perpendicular for probably a decade now.
Posted on Reply
#16
Breit
FordGT90Concept
Everything has been perpendicular for probably a decade now.
That's just plain wrong. Sorry. :) Are you confusing LMR with SMR? No one is doing LMR for a few years now.
Seagate does it's "Archive" series HDDs with SMR for instance. They've also got a 5TB "Desktop" series HDD with SMR and HGST is making its "Ultrastar Archive Ha10" helium drive with SMR too.
Posted on Reply
#17
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
You're right. I thought SMR was bit-level but it is track-level. Enlightening video:

Seagate markets SMR as "Archive" too so these 10 TB drives are not SMR. SMR has a major performance price which is why they're only suitable for archival purposes.
Posted on Reply
#19
lZKoce
I've never heard of this theory that helium is a finite resource, I checked the Forbes article above and it answered my questions :)
Posted on Reply
#20
yogurt_21
25% more capacity, 100% more price... dang early adopter fees.

starting to see them slow down again on magnetic capacities. Not sure how it will go but clearly SSD's can hit the capacity just not the price per gig. (6-7 cents per gig on this one, 30-35 cents per gig on ssd).

beggs the question on how much longer magnetic has as a tech. Rumor mill has large capacity SSD's at 12 cents a gig in 2017. Not quite there but closing in.
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