Tuesday, December 13th 2016

CORSAIR Unveils the Force Series MP500 M.2 NVMe PCIe SSDs

CORSAIR, a world leader in enthusiast memory, high-performance gaming hardware and PC components today announced the immediate availability of the CORSAIR Force MP500 range of M.2 solid state drives, the fastest SSDs yet produced by CORSAIR. Available in 120GB, 240GB and 480GB capacities, the MP500 range delivers blistering performance up to five times faster than traditional SATA 6Gbps SSDs, offering users the next step in high-performance storage in an ultra-compact form factor.

Equipped with a Phison PS5007-E7 NVMe controller and high-bandwidth PCIe Gen. 3 x4 M.2 2280 interface, the MP500 range of drives put your data in the fast lane. Delivering phenomenal data performance including read speeds of up to 3,000 MB/s and write speeds of up 2,400 MB/s, the MP500 range of SSD accelerate system boots, game load times and file transfers beyond anything possible over a single SATA 6Gbps connection.
The ultra-compact M.2 2280 form factor allows the MP500 range to deliver its phenomenal performance in smaller form factors than any previous CORSAIR SSD. With no data or power cables required, an MP500 SSD can be fitted right onto the motherboard or installed into compact laptops and small form factor systems where space is key.

The Force Series MP500 range isn't just small and fast - it's committed to data integrity and reliability. Proprietary SmartECC, SmartRefresh and SmartFlush technologies safeguard data against corruption in case of unexpected power loss or unsafe shutdown, while static and dynamic wear-leveling enhance drive reliability. The entire MP500 range is also fully compatible with CORSAIR SSD Tool box, allowing users to monitor many aspects of their drives health or to securely wipe and clear the drive with ease.

Backed by a comprehensive three-year warranty, the CORSAIR Force Series MP500 range delivers all the simplicity and reliability enthusiasts demand, in an ultra-compact, high-performance package.

Specifications:
  • NVMe PCI Express Gen. 3 x4 interface provides up to a 5x performance improvement over SATA SSDs, allowing you to access all your data with blazing speed.
  • M.2 2280 industry standard compact form factor.
  • Available in various storage capacities including 120GB, 240GB and 480GB.
  • Compatible with Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux, with no special driver or administrative rights required.
  • Enhanced error correction improves data retention.
  • Toughened contact surface material gives better contact to the motherboard and provides vibration resistance.
  • Static and dynamic wear-leveling extends the life of the disk SSD.
  • Advanced garbage collection support provides extended drive management tasks.
  • Compatible with CORSAIR SSD Toolbox for advanced functionality.
  • Extensive 3-year warranty.
Availability, Warranty and Pricing:
The CORSAIR Force Series MP500 range of SSDs are available immediately from the CORSAIR worldwide network of authorized retailers and distributors, as well as direct from the CORSAIR webstore.

For more information, visit the product page.
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23 Comments on CORSAIR Unveils the Force Series MP500 M.2 NVMe PCIe SSDs

#1
bug
One more launch that touts only sequential speeds "up to". Yawn.
Posted on Reply
#2
Chaitanya
Took them long enough. Although like SATA SSDs, M.2 SSD are currently dominated by Samsung it would be interesting to see how this one compares against Samsung.
Posted on Reply
#3
bug
Chaitanya
Took them long enough. Although like SATA SSDs, M.2 SSD are currently dominated by Samsung it would be interesting to see how this one compares against Samsung.
I thought you've learned by now: Samsung will still be unbeatable in benchmarks, users still won't be able to tell what SSD is being used without looking in the box.
What truly separates SSDs is endurance and features (encryption, power failure protection) and even those aren't all that different in the consumer space.
Posted on Reply
#4
TheinsanegamerN
bug
I thought you've learned by now: Samsung will still be unbeatable in benchmarks, users still won't be able to tell what SSD is being used without looking in the box.
What truly separates SSDs is endurance and features (encryption, power failure protection) and even those aren't all that different in the consumer space.
It depends. The endurance between the 960 EVO 1TB and 960 PRO 2tb is a huge gulf. 400TB VS 1.2PB. And the 960 is a MLC drive, instead of a TLC.

What irritates me is the size. Up to 480GB. Why is samsung the only one pursuing a 2TB M.2 NVMe drive, and one of the few that makes 1TB NVMe? Ideally, M.2 could one day replace HDD storage, but not if companies dont try to push capacity up higher and higher.
Posted on Reply
#5
TheLostSwede
bug
One more launch that touts only sequential speeds "up to". Yawn.
Random IOPS on their website, but I guess it took too much effort to click the link?

Here you go, a link to the image on their website, but maybe it'll be too much effort to scroll all the way down to the info you want?

Posted on Reply
#6
bug
TheLostSwede
Random IOPS on their website, but I guess it took too much effort to click the link?

Here you go, a link to the image on their website, but maybe it'll be too much effort to scroll all the way down to the info you want?
Right, QD32, that's what was missing. /s
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#7
zelnep
price is higher than samsung 960 pro! go home, corsair - u drunk!
Posted on Reply
#8
Hood
TheinsanegamerN
It depends. The endurance between the 960 EVO 1TB and 960 PRO 2tb is a huge gulf. 400TB VS 1.2PB. And the 960 is a MLC drive, instead of a TLC.

What irritates me is the size. Up to 480GB. Why is samsung the only one pursuing a 2TB M.2 NVMe drive, and one of the few that makes 1TB NVMe? Ideally, M.2 could one day replace HDD storage, but not if companies dont try to push capacity up higher and higher.
No, this is a very good thing; it allows those on tight budget constraints (self imposed or customer's) to build a system with amazing response using the 120 or 240 ($109 and $169). The lower capacity Samsungs are 15-20% more expensive and rarely in stock, and they don't even offer a 120 (although the 960 Evo 250 is only $130, it's never in stock). When Samsung production catches up with demand, Corsair MP500 pricing will drop lower, but for now it's filling a gap. For a general purpose PC that doesn't need a lot of space for games or large programs, the 120 is a great option.
Don't be irritated about it; after all, how many 1TB SSDs have you bought so far? (the 2.2TB Sammys come out Jan. 2nd for $1300) They are out of my price range, but these MP500s are not...
Posted on Reply
#9
Slizzo
Hood
No, this is a very good thing; it allows those on tight budget constraints (self imposed or customer's) to build a system with amazing response using the 120 or 240 ($109 and $169). The lower capacity Samsungs are 15-20% more expensive and rarely in stock, and they don't even offer a 120 (although the 960 Evo 250 is only $130, it's never in stock). When Samsung production catches up with demand, Corsair MP500 pricing will drop lower, but for now it's filling a gap. For a general purpose PC that doesn't need a lot of space for games or large programs, the 120 is a great option.
Don't be irritated about it; after all, how many 1TB SSDs have you bought so far? (the 2.2TB Sammys come out Jan. 2nd for $1300) They are out of my price range, but these MP500s are not...
I'm not purchasing an M.2 NVMe SSD unless it's a 1tb drive. I need more competition at that price point however.
Posted on Reply
#10
ironwolf
zelnep
price is higher than samsung 960 pro! go home, corsair - u drunk!
Pricing from where? Not seeing it higher than the 960 Pro listings at Newegg (example).
Posted on Reply
#11
bogami
Is the controller cost more to 120GB model as a 1000GB model, I do not think so ! a price above 480Gb or 512GB staggering to grow in abnormal numbers. Memory unit did not cost any more than at PCIe (SATA) models. Realistically it should be priced around $ 230 to 1000GB but it is about 3 times higher. That patents dealers and everyone else who pushed their position in the price steal the hard-earned money from US consumers in good numbers that are in the real application of little Use . ! Because there are differences in micro-seconds in normal use of many applications you need only one SSD.
Posted on Reply
#12
TheLaughingMan
TheinsanegamerN
It depends. The endurance between the 960 EVO 1TB and 960 PRO 2tb is a huge gulf. 400TB VS 1.2PB. And the 960 is a MLC drive, instead of a TLC.
bogami
Is the controller cost more to 120GB model as a 1000GB model, I do not think so ! a price above 480Gb or 512GB staggering to grow in abnormal numbers. Memory unit did not cost any more than at PCIe (SATA) models. Realistically it should be priced around $ 230 to 1000GB but it is about 3 times higher. That patents dealers and everyone else who pushed their position in the price steal the hard-earned money from US consumers in good numbers that are in the real application of little Use . ! Because there are differences in micro-seconds in normal use of many applications you need only one SSD.
Well part of that cost is the fact that they are using a very large buffer for those super high speeds which is 512MB to 2 GB of DDR3. It also has to do with the capacity itself. The post above is wrong as the Samsung 960 Pro is not MLC. It is their 3D V-NAND and all three of those (like these Corsairs) will have the same number of memory chips which means the density was increased for the higher capacities. That will obviously affect yields, cost of manufacturing, etc.

The price may be slightly inflated, but they are not just sticking an extra memory module on their and charging twice the price.
Posted on Reply
#13
Blueberries
That phison controller is really nice which could have made these interesting as an economy drive but the MSRP is way too high.

Buying Corsair is one of two things:

A.) Really great product for the highest price on the market
or
B.) Mediocre product for a not so mediocre price.

Add this to their list of flops
Posted on Reply
#16
bug
TheLaughingMan
Well part of that cost is the fact that they are using a very large buffer for those super high speeds which is 512MB to 2 GB of DDR3. It also has to do with the capacity itself. The post above is wrong as the Samsung 960 Pro is not MLC. It is their 3D V-NAND and all three of those (like these Corsairs) will have the same number of memory chips which means the density was increased for the higher capacities. That will obviously affect yields, cost of manufacturing, etc.

The price may be slightly inflated, but they are not just sticking an extra memory module on their and charging twice the price.
Samsung 960 is most definitely MLC. It's V-NAND MLC: www.anandtech.com/show/10754/samsung-960-pro-ssd-review
Posted on Reply
#18
TheOne
Pro is MLC, but the Evo is TLC.
Posted on Reply
#19
TheinsanegamerN
Hood
No, this is a very good thing; it allows those on tight budget constraints (self imposed or customer's) to build a system with amazing response using the 120 or 240 ($109 and $169). The lower capacity Samsungs are 15-20% more expensive and rarely in stock, and they don't even offer a 120 (although the 960 Evo 250 is only $130, it's never in stock). When Samsung production catches up with demand, Corsair MP500 pricing will drop lower, but for now it's filling a gap. For a general purpose PC that doesn't need a lot of space for games or large programs, the 120 is a great option.
Don't be irritated about it; after all, how many 1TB SSDs have you bought so far? (the 2.2TB Sammys come out Jan. 2nd for $1300) They are out of my price range, but these MP500s are not...
I've bought 3 for myself, and several times that for machines I've built. Especially for holding games, a 480GB drive doesnt cut it, not when one game can eat up 50GB, and data caps are more and more restricting.
Posted on Reply
#20
Hood
TheinsanegamerN
I've bought 3 for myself, and several times that for machines I've built. Especially for holding games, a 480GB drive doesnt cut it, not when one game can eat up 50GB, and data caps are more and more restricting.
This discussion is about 1TB M.2 NVMe drives - you say you've bought 3 for yourself and several times that for other people - that's amazing! Also amazing is the fact that you're not showing your system specs after spending thousands of $ on it. Since you obviously like to brag about all your high-end hardware, it seems odd that you neglected to fill out your profile after 4 years! Please elaborate, and tell us about this triple-M.2 system you built - are those drives in RAID? What kind of throughput are you getting with that setup?
Also try to remember that not every system is built for gaming, some people actually do productive work, content creation, photo and video editing, etc. When posting on forums, credibility counts, and yours is lacking...
Posted on Reply
#21
TheinsanegamerN
Hood
This discussion is about 1TB M.2 NVMe drives - you say you've bought 3 for yourself and several times that for other people - that's amazing! Also amazing is the fact that you're not showing your system specs after spending thousands of $ on it. Since you obviously like to brag about all your high-end hardware, it seems odd that you neglected to fill out your profile after 4 years! Please elaborate, and tell us about this triple-M.2 system you built - are those drives in RAID? What kind of throughput are you getting with that setup?
Also try to remember that not every system is built for gaming, some people actually do productive work, content creation, photo and video editing, etc. When posting on forums, credibility counts, and yours is lacking...
You asked how many 1TB SSDs I've purchased, not how many 1TB NVMe drives I purchased.
how many 1TB SSDs have you bought so far
Obviously, the number of 1TB NVMe drives I've purchased is 0, as they are near impossible to find, and my desktop cant boot off of them, as it is a core i5 3570k rig. Kinda hard to buy them when nobody made them. And I've never filled out the profile because, honestly, I dont feel like doing it.

If you must know the system specs, it is a
i5 3570k 4.2GHz
asus p8z77 v pro
16GB LPDDR3 1600
1x512GB SSD for boot drive
2X1TB SSD for storage
Radeon xfx 480 GTR as a placeholder until vega releases.
throughput on the dual 1TBs is about 700-800MB/s.


So cool your jets bro. This isnt an ePeen contest.
Posted on Reply
#23
CrAsHnBuRnXp
I thought corsair's motto was "RBG everything!". Wheres my RBG at? :'( (im really into the RBG craze and hope it continues for a long time)
Posted on Reply
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