Thursday, May 25th 2017

NVMe 1.3 Specification Published

NVM Express, the special interest group behind the NVMe protocol, which enables significantly higher performance on flash-based storage devices, compared to the AHCI protocol, published the NVMe 1.3 specification. This is the most significant update to the protocol since the NVMe 1.2 specification released in 2014. NVMe 1.3, which could be implemented in SSDs, motherboards, and HBA cards starting late-2017 or 2018, introduces several major features that increase performance, endurance, and manageability of flash-based storage devices, such as SSDs.

To begin with, NVMe 1.3 introduces a drive self-test feature similar to SMART. The host machine can now command the drive to perform a self-test without having to mount volumes and expose their contents to OS-based utilities. The self-test parameters could be left up to the drive vendor, and could include hardware tests in addition to data integrity tests. The protocol also adds much needed support for boot-partitions, without needing the motherboard UEFI firmware to store it. The current implementation of motherboards with NVMe booting support involves storing a tiny boot partition with the bootloader on the SPI flash chip of the motherboard which stores the UEFI firmware.
Also included in the NVMe 1.3 protocol is the new "sanitize" command, which performs a hardware-level secure-erase, which wipes data from not just the NAND flash user-area, but also the controller memory buffer, overprovisioning area, DRAM cache, etc., ensuring a more reliable data wipe. The specification also adds Single Root I/O Virtualization (SRIO-V) support.Source: NVMe SIG
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11 Comments on NVMe 1.3 Specification Published

#1
DeathtoGnomes
SSDs with NVMe speeds? thats almost fap material!:laugh::laugh::laugh:
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#2
TheLostSwede
DeathtoGnomes said:
SSDs with NVMe speeds? thats almost fap material!:laugh::laugh::laugh:
Good thing it's easy to sanitize then...
Posted on Reply
#3
DeathtoGnomes
TheLostSwede said:
Good thing it's easy to sanitize then...
Thats a very nice feature, maybe even the best because of every nook and cranny that it erases from.
Posted on Reply
#4
Bruno Vieira
DeathtoGnomes said:
SSDs with NVMe speeds? thats almost fap material!:laugh::laugh::laugh:
THey already exits, they are called SSDs with the NVMe Protocol! They need pci-e lanes because the sata interface is so slow, also the AHCI protocol is another protocol itself
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#5
biffzinker
Bruno Vieira said:
THey already exits, they are called SSDs with the NVMe Protocol! They need pci-e lanes because the sata interface is so slow,
That would be SATA Express but it hasn't taken off going by recent motherboards dropping support after the Intel Z97-Z170 PCH.
Adoption of the SATA Express connector was extremely slow. At the launch of the Z97 chipsets there were no drives that supported the cable. Motherboard support at the time was also uneven. High-end solid state drives that might have used the SATA Express connector instead opted for the M.2 standard. One reason for this was that M.2 drives could be used in both desktops and notebooks.

With the expected future adoption of the U.2 standard it is unclear if SATA Express will ever see wide-spread use.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SATA_Express
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#7
Octopuss
This looks interesting. Maybe it's a good idea to hold off a storage upgrade by a year or so if one can?

DeathtoGnomes said:
SSDs with NVMe speeds? thats almost fap material!:laugh::laugh::laugh:
Where have you been?
Samsung 950 series is what, over a year old now? Or more?
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#8
DeathtoGnomes
Octopuss said:
This looks interesting. Maybe it's a good idea to hold off a storage upgrade by a year or so if one can?


Where have you been?
Samsung 950 series is what, over a year old now? Or more?
oh so A 950 series is a SSD with a SATA connection doing m.2 NVMe speeds? So how is that priced?
Posted on Reply
#9
Octopuss
No, 950 is M.2 and NVMe.
I'm just saying these SSDs have been around for a while. It's nothing new.
Posted on Reply
#10
DeathtoGnomes
Octopuss said:
No, 950 is M.2 and NVMe.
I'm just saying these SSDs have been around for a while. It's nothing new.
LOL :banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead:

(having to explain everything to everyone really takes the fun outta this)
Posted on Reply
#11
Octopuss
I have no idea what are you on about, but I don't really care.
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