Friday, May 26th 2017

AMD Announces AGESA Update 1.0.0.6 - Supports up to 4000 MHz Memory Clocks

You've probably heard of AMD's AGESA updates by now - the firmware updates that are ironing out the remaining kinks in AMD's Ryzen platform, which really could have used a little more time in the oven before release. However, kinks have been disappearing, the platform has been maturing and evolving, and AMD has been working hard in improving the experience for consumers and enthusiasts alike. As a brief primer, AGESA is responsible for initializing AMD x86-64 processors during boot time, acting as something of a "nucleus" for the BIOS of your motherboard. Motherboard vendors take the core capabilities of AGESA updates and build on them with their own "secret sauce" to create the BIOS that ultimately populate your motherboard of choice. The process of cooking up BIOS updates built on the new AGESA will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, but AMD's Robert Hallock says you should be seeing BIOSes based on this version halfway through the month of June - if your vendor isn't already providing a Beta version of some kind.

This new AGESA update code, version 1.0.0.6, should be just up the alley of enthusiasts, however, in that it adds a grand total of 26 new parameters for memory configuration, improving the compatibility and reliability of DRAM, especially for memory that does not follow the industry-standard JEDEC specifications (e.g. faster than 2667, manual overclocking, or XMP2 profiles). Below you'll find the 26 parameters that were introduced.
As an added bonus for users interested in virtualization, this new AGESA update also brings something their way, through support for PCI Express Access Control Services (ACS).This capability is especially useful for users that want 3D-accelerated graphics inside a virtual machine. With ACS support, it is possible to split a 2-GPU system such that a host Linux OS and a Windows VM both have a dedicated graphics cards. The virtual machine can access all the capabilities of the dedicated GPU, and run games inside the virtual machine at near-native performance.Source: Community @ AMD
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48 Comments on AMD Announces AGESA Update 1.0.0.6 - Supports up to 4000 MHz Memory Clocks

#1
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
TheGuruStud said:
If you want tighter timings, yes. But you can take a good 2400 stick and run it at 34-3600 with loose timings. Sure, bandwidth won't increase, but you get the fabric pumped up. That's what I was getting at.
No that isn't how any of this AMD stuff has worked. Pushing higher clockspeeds on the ram requires specific kits right now. You cannot adjust tertiary timings and those are running too tight to be stable at high speed with anything, but -b kits, at least when you are talking in the 3600+ range.

TheGuruStud said:
You have a point, but I was referring to collusion in reduced production aka price fixing.
XMP is an intel thing. They advertise them for Z170/Z270 and sometimes X99. Good luck getting a Judge to award anything to someone using an overclocking profile on the wrong platform.

saikamaldoss said:
No I am on 9945 bios on my CH6 and running F4-3200C14D-32GTZ at 3333mhz now. It's a duel rank and I am getting 3399 with BcLk 101.7..
It is however a Samsung -b kit.

TheLaughingMan said:
But it is higher than what every claimed you should be able to get with double-side RAM.
There are already people pushing 3600 on XS with dual rank dimms.
Posted on Reply
#2
GoldenX
theoneandonlymrk said:
That's my pickup win there though if im honest im not sure how i would use it or what for but i like the sound of it.
And will definitely try it at some point:)
You don't need to reboot to play a game with almost native performance (~90-95%), and it's a lot easier to block all the Windows 10 telemetry with the Linux firewall.

Tested it on the cheapest PC possible, an A4-4000. Works as intended without problems, but you need at the very least 4 threads or else the overhead kills your performance, that won't be a problem with a Ryzen APU.
Posted on Reply
#3
Chaitanya
TheGuruStud said:
If you want tighter timings, yes. But you can take a good 2400 stick and run it at 34-3600 with loose timings. Sure, bandwidth won't increase, but you get the fabric pumped up. That's what I was getting at.



You have a point, but I was referring to collusion in reduced production aka price fixing.
I am pretty sure Ram makers will get away with that lawsuit unless they are caught red handed of collusion(similar to one of the ODD based lawsuit). One of the claims would be they are supporting mobile market(Cellphones and tablets) hence the reason for increased prices from increased demand.
Posted on Reply
#4
Solidstate89
Biggest thing I've been waiting for regarding whether I'd purchase a Ryzen platform or not.
Posted on Reply
#5
AndreiD
Solidstate89 said:
Biggest thing I've been waiting for regarding whether I'd purchase a Ryzen platform or not.
If you're thinking Ryzen will be an upgrade from your 4770K, especially in gaming, you are dearly mistaken. Most games ran better on my old OCed 2600K (4.5Ghz) than they do on my new R7 1700 at 3.6Ghz.
You should only upgrade if you have highly threaded workloads that can actually use Ryzen's many threads, otherwise it's going to be a downgrade.
Posted on Reply
#6
Solidstate89
AndreiD said:
If you're thinking Ryzen will be an upgrade from your 4770K, especially in gaming, you are dearly mistaken. Most games ran better on my old OCed 2600K (4.5Ghz) than they do on my new R7 1700 at 3.6Ghz.
You should only upgrade if you have highly threaded workloads that can actually use Ryzen's many threads, otherwise it's going to be a downgrade.
I do renderings, encodings and VMs besides just gaming. The extra threads would help a lot.
Posted on Reply
#7
biffzinker
r9 said:
I wonder how much improvement we will see in Games with Infinite Fabric @4ghz.
Wouldn't that be half the RAM speed so 2000 MHz for the Infinite Fabric? 2000x256/8=64 GB/s
Posted on Reply
#8
AndreiD
Solidstate89 said:
I do renderings, encodings and VMs besides just gaming. The extra threads would help a lot.
In that case, go for it, the R7s excel in anything that can put their threads to use, but you can also wait a bit more and see if Threadripper might be worth it.
Posted on Reply
#9
dorsetknob
"YOUR RMA REQUEST IS CON-REFUSED"
Raevenlord said:
With ACS support, it is possible to split a 2-GPU system such that a host Linux OS and a Windows VM both have a dedicated graphics cards. The virtual machine can access all the capabilities of the dedicated GPU, and run games inside the virtual machine at near-native performance.
Extremely usefull function if it works as speculated
Posted on Reply
#10
R-T-B
dorsetknob said:
Extremely usefull function if it works as speculated
Moderately useful, honestly. I mean you need one GPU for each OS.
Posted on Reply
#11
DeathtoGnomes
AndreiD said:
In that case, go for it, the R7s excel in anything that can put their threads to use, but you can also wait a bit more and see if Threadripper might be worth it.
i think someone posted some speculation of Threadripper prices with 16/32 over $1k.
Posted on Reply
#12
GoldenX
R-T-B said:
Moderately useful, honestly. I mean you need one GPU for each OS.
IGP or cheap G210/HD5450 for Linux, dedicated for vidya.
Posted on Reply
#13
Joss
GoldenX said:
You don't need to reboot to play a game with almost native performance (~90-95%), and it's a lot easier to block all the Windows 10 telemetry with the Linux firewall.
dorsetknob said:
Extremely usefull function if it works as speculated
I find this extremely exciting, hope it works as advertised.
Posted on Reply
#14
tacosRcool
HisDivineOrder said:
Because one person proves the rule, right? ;) The problem was MOST people couldn't make it work, not that there wasn't a single person out there that couldn't.
I'm running at 2933 mhz as well. And this is before this new update.
Posted on Reply
#15
aGeoM
OneMoar said:
yep and with intel you can throw any old 2133/2400mhz kit in and it won't care
Posted on Reply
#16
evernessince
OneMoar said:
you take a performance hit is what I am getting at
Techspot already did an article on this and they found that RAM speed in games scales about the same on Ryzen as it does on Intel systems. Both benefit from higher clocked RAM, it just that Ryzen benefits in other applications more.
Posted on Reply
#17
NGreediaOrAMSlow
OneMoar said:
by the time you pay for 4Ghz ram and wait for boards and bios's to catch up
you could have just bought a intel setup for less >_>
Less pain and headache, but definitely not money. Motherboards are around the same price, so is the RAM. And AMD cpus depending on the model are around 25-50% cheaper.

And they have proven already, even at release that were faster than Intel in all escenarios except for gaming, where core and memory speed are king. If AMD fix that, then is game over.

And if there is still some doubt, Threadripper is gonna place the final blow.
Posted on Reply
#18
Tomorrow
AndreiD said:
If you're thinking Ryzen will be an upgrade from your 4770K, especially in gaming, you are dearly mistaken. Most games ran better on my old OCed 2600K (4.5Ghz) than they do on my new R7 1700 at 3.6Ghz.
You should only upgrade if you have highly threaded workloads that can actually use Ryzen's many threads, otherwise it's going to be a downgrade.
Is this based on your experience or are you repeating benchmarks that are run on 1080p with low settings and Titan Xp?

For me on 1440p things would be GPU limited. Tho Ryzen does help on 0.1% and 1% low scores.
Posted on Reply
#19
DeathtoGnomes
Tomorrow said:
Is this based on your experience or are you repeating benchmarks that are run on 1080p with low settings and Titan Xp?

For me on 1440p things would be GPU limited. Tho Ryzen does help on 0.1% and 1% low scores.
this update should make even better in those scores and with games. no sense arguing about it now, wait for the update.
Posted on Reply
#20
purecain
why do people of which whom obviously have no first hand knowledge start professing to know all to tpu members. I hear some funny ideas....

anyway, I ugraded from intel 4770k to 1800x. my cpu single core was weaker than one single core from ryzen. not by too much but an improvement on the amd side oc vs oc.
my ram runs @ 3466 divider @1.35v and in games I not only reach the fps I did on the 4770k, I also get far smoother frame times making gaming on the amd system far more enjoyable. this is only my first hand experience....so imo.

anyone who owns an intel 4c 8t cpu should upgrade asap to the amd architecture. getting the frame times right trumps anything else. and btw since the new amd micro code released my fps compete with the jerky 7700k. so to clarify, the 7700k shows higher frames, but has uneven frame times making games feel less smooth. in comparison the amd frame times are completely smooth.

my user experience matches that of the 6850k easily.... I'm very happy using my quicker AMD system... the architecture is something else.:toast:
Posted on Reply
#21
DeathtoGnomes
purecain said:
anyway, I ugraded from intel 4770k to 1800x.
I like the way this sounds. :D
Posted on Reply
#22
AndreiD
Tomorrow said:
Is this based on your experience or are you repeating benchmarks that are run on 1080p with low settings and Titan Xp?

For me on 1440p things would be GPU limited. Tho Ryzen does help on 0.1% and 1% low scores.
It's based on experience, but there are plenty of reviews out there which show it not being the best for gaming.
The only game so far in which I've seen a boost compared to the old overclocked 2600K has been Civ 6. I can't think of any other game in which I noticed better performance with Ryzen, I didn't measure minimums, but I didn't get much suttering with the old Sandy either (had decently fast DDR3). In some cases I even noticed lower FPS, like Squad, but I'd chalk that down to it being an Early Access game.

If you want a gaming CPU, personally I'd wait for the new Skylake-X line, the 6C/12T probably won't be that much more expensive than the R7 parts and higher IPC coupled with Skylake-X probably being able to reach higher than 4Ghz clocks will make it a much better CPU for gaming.
Posted on Reply
#23
Tomorrow
Well that depends. While i agree that Skylake-X will likely be faster and higher clocked than Ryzen 7 the platform costs will be higher. Im waiting to see if intel offers proper soldered IHS this time. I have no desire to delid SKL-X no matter how fast it is compared to R7.
Tho when we're talking about 6c/12 it should be compared to R5 instead wich is even cheaper.

Personally i think HEDT platforms be they upcoming X299 SKL-X or Threadripper are always a bad value-performance proposition when it comes to gaming. Mainstream R5 and i7 are always better in this regard.
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