Friday, July 28th 2017

AMD Ryzen Threadripper Delidded - It's EPYC

Overclocker extraordinaire der8auer, who was one of the most vocal enthusiasts calling out for better VRM designs on Intel's X299 platform (and who worked with ASUS on redesigning the VRM cooling in its motherboards) has gone and done it: he delidded a Ryzen Threadripper CPU. And this delidding went on to deliver the goods: Ryzen Threadripper delidded is EPYC (pun intended.)

Instead of the expected MCM composed of two dies (with two CCXs of four cores per die, delivering the 16 cores we were expecting), Ryzen Threadripper is actually a much more interesting chip: it seems to be a full fledged EPYC chip, with four dies of eight cores. According to der8auer, when questioned, AMD confirmed that 16-core Threadripper 1950X CPUs are configured with two working eight core dies (four CCXs of four cores each), while the other eight-core dies are disabled by AMD.
A very, very interesting question here is whether these are actually defective or just disabled by AMD, which is something the company is naturally mum about. With AMD's history of core unlocking, and the fact that Zen-based CPUs have high yields, we can certainly hope (maybe even expect) that not all disabled cores are non-functional, and that AMD had to disable some of them so as to achieve their SKU core-count. Whether or not those will be unlockable, though, is anybody's guess. Der8auer also found that AMD Threadripper dies are gold plated on the inside, so as to improve conditions and adherence of the indium solder AMD used (some users might say that while Intel uses cheap TIM on their HEDT, X299 CPUs, AMD even sells these with gold inside.) This fact naturally also opens the question of future platform scalability - AMD can certainly decide to just up available maximum core-count on their Threadripper line of CPUs (we still have at least 4 model numbers above the 1950X, an potentially more.)
Check Der8auer's delidding video on YouTube below.

Source: Der8auer's YouTube Channel
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55 Comments on AMD Ryzen Threadripper Delidded - It's EPYC

#51
GreiverBlade
iO said:
Every IHS since Pentium 4 was soldered.
muh??? ....

even the HEDT has a TIM IHS instead of solder ... with Intel ...
soldered since P4 .... i think not ... a C2D E7200 has a TIM no solder (so is the C2D E8400/500 and many other after them )

Intel has used TIM on their CPU's for a long time, not in HEDT at 1st but it seems now they are even going for TIM in that segment.

remember :
https://www.techpowerup.com/165882/tim-is-behind-ivy-bridge-temperatures-after-all
yep ... soldered right?
Kabylake/skylake-X?
http://wccftech.com/intels-core-x-series-skylake-x-and-kabylake-x-will-not-be-using-soldered-integrated-heat-spreader-ihs/ don't think so ...

Haswell to Haswell Devil's Canyon refresh was also a "better" TIM refresh move

actually the TIM is not that bad .... but on HEDT it's questionable to not solder the IHS
Posted on Reply
#52
bug
Basard said:
They used to. You don't have to be rich to be an enthusiast. Remember the old 300mhz Celeron? No L2 cache... you could OC to 500Mhz easy. Now they are 10x the Ghz and 10x the cores.... holy shit!

Edit: Now that I think of it, it was either Celeron or Pentium back then, or K6 series.... And I remember the prices on even the Celerons being too high--for me anyways.
Oh, I remember those well. I had my first job building PCs back then and while I put together a lot of systems, I was stuck with a 486 (not even Intel, it was an AMD). But between those Celerons and the new Kaby Lake Pentium, I don't recall any entry level CPU being sought after by overclockers.

PS: There was also Cyrix, but they gave up the ghost right about when the said Celerons came about.
Posted on Reply
#53
Mescalamba
"Cheap" AMD is using goldplated parts to have better heat transfer and solder adhesion, while "expensive" Intel uses grey or white goo.

I think its AMD 1:0 Intel.
Posted on Reply
#54
Mescalamba
bug said:
Oh, I remember those well. I had my first job building PCs back then and while I put together a lot of systems, I was stuck with a 486 (not even Intel, it was an AMD). But between those Celerons and the new Kaby Lake Pentium, I don't recall any entry level CPU being sought after by overclockers.

PS: There was also Cyrix, but they gave up the ghost right about when the said Celerons came about.
Remember that one, got it to 800 MHz semi-stable. :D
Posted on Reply
#55
Zerofool
OSdevr said:
I'm pretty sure both Intel and AMD have made the IHS out of nickel plated copper since they started using them.
Hmm, it seems I've been living with this illusion in my head for so many years :). Thanks for pointing that out. It's maybe the fact that there are some custom copper IHS's for sale out there that made me think that, but on a second glance it appears that their purpose is a bit different (thicker, more rigid for higher pressure mounting, LN2, etc.).
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