Sunday, July 30th 2017

AMD Announces Full Ryzen Threadripper Lineup and Availability

AMD today officially announced some more details on its brain-child and market-stormer Ryzen Threadripper HEDT line of CPUs. Ryzen is a true new stand-alone architecture for AMD, the result of more than four years of careful planning and silicon design towards reaching a truly scalable, highly-flexible, non-glued together MCM design that could power all experiences and workloads through a single architecture design. The Ryzen architecture is already powering desktops with Ryzen 3, 5 and 7 desktop CPUs; has extended to server-side deployments through its EPYC line-up and will begin shipping for professionals with Ryzen PRO starting in Q3 2017. Also announced was that it will find its way to mobile APUs around Q4, paired with the new Vega graphics microarchitecture; and will even power professional-geared mobile solutions in 1H18. But more immediately, it's coming to the HEDT market. And AMD is putting that fight in the hands of Threadripper.

AMD pits its HEDT line-up to developers, researchers, prosumers, creators, and even multi-tasking gamers. Increased compute capabilities with up to 16 cores and 32 threads; larger memory footprint, increased I/O and storage, and support for many more GPUs and PCIe lanes ensure a stable, impressive platform for today's large data sets and tomorrow's exponentially more resource-intensive workloads. AMD will execute this with a three-pronged approach. There will be three processor models on offer for their HEDT platform. The $999 TR 1950X and $799 TR 1920X are known quantities already, with their respective 16 cores (32 threads) and 12 cores (24 threads). The new addition, however, comes in the form of the $549 TR 1900X, which offers not only 8 cores (16 threads) and 3.8 GHz base, 4.0 GHz boost clocks, but a clear upgrade path within AMD's new platform. Say what you will about AMD's offerings and execution, one thing is for sure: Zen and all the silicon it powers have prompted a reshuffle of the CPU landscape as we hadn't seen in years. Coincidence? AMD doesn't think so.
AMD's promise with Threadripper is deceivingly simple: leverage an architecture that was built to be scalable, and provide great yields through the pairing of core complexes with a high-speed data interconnect (Infinity Fabric), and scale down or up from there. Gone are monolithic dies. In are a higher core and thread counts at a price significantly lower than Intel's offerings.
More cores aren't exactly an automatic performance win, as we've seen with AMD's Bulldozer architecture and derivatives. The company re-engineered that slightly ahead of its time and relied too much on software support and workload optimization, which kinda never happened. With the new architecture focusing more on working well on existing solutions the result is an architecture that delivers the highest IPC in AMD's history, sips power gently, and can, according to AMD, edge the competitor's offerings by as much as 55% when comparing similarly-priced TR 1950X and Core i9-7900X. For a lower price tag you get up to 19%, thanks to a higher core-count (TR 1920X vs Core i9-7900X.) And for users who want a clear upgrade path in the future, AMD is offering the ability to invest $549 in an 8-core, 16-thread socket TR4 processor, enabling an upgrade path down the line to users that require the increased gruff.
A new CPU with an absent ecosystem, however, won't achieve much; a CPU can hardly be seated alone inside a HEDT box. As such, AMD has taken steps to ensure availability of a healthy ecosystem at launch, with some of the world's most recognized motherboard manufacturers having top of the line products based on the X399 chipset ready already. The cooling solutions available for these monster chips are nothing to be scoffed at, either, featuring some 20 liquid cooling solutions that are TR4-compatible at launch (from companies such as Corsair, Arctic, EKWB, NZXT, Thermaltake, Cryorig, and EVGA (mainly Asetek-produced units), as well as at least five air cooling options from Arctic, Noctua, and Coolermaster. And let's not forget boutique system integrators which will keep AMD's Threadripper in a premium package - AMD has partnered with Alienware for such a system.
Availability is the old question; and now, we have answers, directly from AMD themselves. You can pout your hands on Threadripper's highest core-count processors as soon as August 10th, in the form of the 1950X and 1920X HEDT CPUs. If those are a little too rich for your pocket (or for your particular core-computing HEDT needs), the $549 TR 1900X will be available at the end of the month, on August 31st. Pre-orders through retailers and boutique OEMs will be available starting tomorrow, July 31st.
We also got a better look at the Ryzen Threadripper retail packaging today, which looks very fancy and has an unlock wheel at the back. We will never know how much, if at all, this packaging added to the product cost relative to a more simple cardboard box but the petty little person inside me appreciates it and wants to unbox Threadripper more now. So perhaps it was worth it after all.
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20 Comments on AMD Announces Full Ryzen Threadripper Lineup and Availability

#1
KarymidoN
For $549 MSRP you can have all of those 64 PCI-E Lanes... hmmm... lets see how it performs...
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#2
OSdevr
No 10 core, that's interesting. Perhaps they can only disable cores in groups of 4 (half a die).
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#3
Chaitanya
Installation method of Threadripper is also quite unique. Hopefully that wrench is included in the box(CPU or MB). So that 1900X is for anyone who complained about reduced PCI-E lanes on R7-1800X and other Octa core cpus after initial RYzen launch. But those 64 PCI-E lanes do seem to come at a premium over 1800X.
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#4
DeathtoGnomes
To have an entry level TR is cool and all, but...shouldnt it be closer, if not the same as 1800X pricing?
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#5
Durvelle27
Want that 1950X but man it's odd that that decided to include a 8C in the lineup when they have the 1700(X) & 1800(X)
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#6
GoldenX
Get one of these 32 threads monsters, grab two 1080s, a low end GPU, a bunch of RAM, and with IOMMU you have 2 gaming PCs and a Linux server in a single computer for a lower cost than the Intel platform.

Durvelle27 said:
Want that 1950X but man it's odd that that decided to include a 8C in the lineup when they have the 1700(X) & 1800(X)
Similar to Intel's i5 and i7 HEDT processors.
Posted on Reply
#7
TheLostSwede
Chaitanya said:
Installation method of Threadripper is also quite unique. Hopefully that wrench is included in the box(CPU or MB). So that 1900X is for anyone who complained about reduced PCI-E lanes on R7-1800X and other Octa core cpus after initial RYzen launch. But those 64 PCI-E lanes do seem to come at a premium over 1800X.
It is.

The base retail package does not come with a cooler said:
To have an entry level TR is cool and all, but...shouldnt it be closer, if not the same as 1800X pricing?
It's that torx drive and the packaging, it's worth at least $9.99 on its own... :p
I mean, just look at that knob, have you ever seen a CPU packaging with a knob on it before?
Posted on Reply
#8
B-Real
DeathtoGnomes said:
To have an entry level TR is cool and all, but...shouldnt it be closer, if not the same as 1800X pricing?
This will be a premium 1800X with excessive amount of PCI-E lanes. Which turns out not to be a lack for cheaper (R7 and below) Ryzens, but a premium option (this is for the fanboys laughing about the amount of PCI-E lanes on 1800X).
Posted on Reply
#9
champsilva
Is AMD trying to fix the Ryzen prices? Theyve launched too cheap and now theyre offering a few pci-lanes and maybe 20% more performance than 1700X, but for that youre paying a lot of extra money.
Posted on Reply
#10
B-Real
champsilva said:
Is AMD trying to fix the Ryzen prices? Theyve launched too cheap and now theyre offering a few pci-lanes and maybe 20% more performance than 1700X, but for that youre paying a lot of extra money.
Maybe. But you can still buy those CPUs, so nothing changes. It seems a good business model.
Posted on Reply
#11
TheLostSwede
champsilva said:
Is AMD trying to fix the Ryzen prices? Theyve launched too cheap and now theyre offering a few pci-lanes and maybe 20% more performance than 1700X, but for that youre paying a lot of extra money.
I'm a bit annoyed with this, not that I have the money to spend on it, but I was really hoping that the X370 "platform" would have had another 8 PCIe lanes or so, not for GPUs, but to be more future proof for storage. I guess we'll have to wait two generations for that now, unless they do an Intel and does an X380/X470 chipset that acts as a PCIe 3.0 splitter and gives out PCIe 3.0 lanes instead of 2.0 lanes like the X370.
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#12
Vayra86
OSdevr said:
No 10 core, that's interesting. Perhaps they can only disable cores in groups of 4 (half a die).
In terms of how IF works, that'd make sense yes, because the 'outer' core complex would be making two jumps to reach the next CCX in the die next to it. So its rather 2 groups of 2 per die.

I also reckon that this setup has the best yields, because you have a 'spare core' for every other one next to it that is not functional.
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#13
DeathtoGnomes
Vayra86 said:
In terms of how IF works, that'd make sense yes, because the 'outer' core complex would be making two jumps to reach the next CCX in the die next to it. So its rather 2 groups of 2 per die.

I also reckon that this setup has the best yields, because you have a 'spare core' for every other one next to it that is not functional.
its easier to expand exponentially with even numbers than odd numbers.:D
Posted on Reply
#14
XiGMAKiD
TheLostSwede said:
It's that torx drive and the packaging, it's worth at least $9.99 on its own... :p
I mean, just look at that knob, have you ever seen a CPU packaging with a knob on it before?

*turn the knob*
*music starts playing*
Posted on Reply
#15
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
champsilva said:
Is AMD trying to fix the Ryzen prices? Theyve launched too cheap and now theyre offering a few pci-lanes and maybe 20% more performance than 1700X, but for that youre paying a lot of extra money.
This is HEDT not mainstream since the dawn if HEDT you have paid more.
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#16
Prince Valiant
DeathtoGnomes said:
To have an entry level TR is cool and all, but...shouldnt it be closer, if not the same as 1800X pricing?
I imagine the reasoning is that it has quad-channel memory, more PCIe lanes, and is on the HEDT platform.
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#17
Dionysus
DeathtoGnomes said:
To have an entry level TR is cool and all, but...shouldnt it be closer, if not the same as 1800X pricing?
For those that have forgotten, the 1800X launched at $500USD. The 1900X is $50USD more, so, yeah, it is closer to the price of the 1800X.
Posted on Reply
#18
R0H1T
Dionysus said:
For those that have forgotten, the 1800X launched at $500USD. The 1900X is $50USD more, so, yeah, it is closer to the price of the 1800X.
And for those reasons it cannot be $500 or less, not officially, lest they kill the 1800x quite possibly at a later date.
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#19
XiGMAKiD
I wonder if motherboard vendors gonna make a mining version of TR board, because with 1900X and its 64 PCIe Gen.3 lanes you could make a pretty dense system
Posted on Reply
#20
DeathtoGnomes
Dionysus said:
For those that have forgotten, the 1800X launched at $500USD. The 1900X is $50USD more, so, yeah, it is closer to the price of the 1800X.
I did forget, but 1800x is now closer to $400. On sale even less than that. SO i guess we can expect the 1900X to be sub-$500 a month or two after release.
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