Monday, November 13th 2017

Fujitsu Refreshes LIFEBOOK Notebook Line with New Thin, Value-Focused Models

Fujitsu unveils a new generation of its best-selling notebook, the Fujitsu Notebook LIFEBOOK E5 and LIFEBOOK E4 series. A refreshed, slimmer design gives the business notebook line a contemporary look. Under the skin, the fully featured LIFEBOOK E5 is based on the latest Intel processors and is packed with connectivity options, ensuring secure, convenient access to corporate networks via cable, wireless or mobile networks.

All new LIFEBOOK E4 and LIFEBOOK E5 series models feature the new area type fingerprint sensor that responds instantly to provide one-touch login and system unlock. Also focusing on ease-of-use, Fujitsu introduces a precision touchpad that is more accurate, with support for three-finger gestures as featured in the latest version of Microsoft Windows 10, and a sculpted, ergonomic palm rest.
Focus on value for money with the brand new LIFEBOOK E4 family
Providing excellent value for money was the focus in developing a completely new entry level model, the LIFEBOOK E4 series. The 15.6-inch and 14-inch notebooks come with the 7th Gen Intel Core processor and feature a choice of HD or Full HD anti-glare displays, and provide day-long battery runtime. Fujitsu has focused on making it simple to access and interchange components including memory, hard drives and connectivity components like LTE and WLAN, while batteries can be exchanged without any need to dismantle the notebook.

The new LIFEBOOK E5 family aims to build on its heritage as a firm favorite with enterprises, with features such as embedded 4G/LTE, support for classic VGA outputs and a full size Ethernet port. The thinner LIFEBOOK E5 is now just 23.9 mm high, a 24 percent reduction on the outgoing model. The LIFEBOOK E5 boasts a choice of 15.6-inch and 14-inch anti-glare, Full HD displays and the latest, 8th generation Intel Core processor, plus high-end notebook features such as an optional backlit keyboard. Ease of maintenance and administration is assured due to the use of the same BIOS and disk images, and a common format for shared spares such as batteries. Both LIFEBOOK E5 models share the same port replicator with the ultra-mobile LIFEBOOK U7 family.

Ruediger Landto, Head of Category Management for Client Computing Devices at Fujitsu EMEIA, says: "The new business-class LIFEBOOK E series includes components like fingerprint sensors, smartcard readers and a full range of current and legacy ports, so there's no need for users to carry around a bag of adaptors to connect to projectors, displays, networks and peripherals. Both our new-generation LIFEBOOK E series models are designed to empower users, thanks to day-long battery life, crisp, clear displays, ergonomic, tactile keyboards, and optional features such as new USB Type-C ports and unrivalled connectivity including 4G/LTE via an integrated SIM card slot."

Pricing and availability
The LIFEBOOK E5 series is sold globally. E5 pricing in the Europe, Middle East, India and Africa (EMEIA) region starts at EUR 699 plus tax. The LIFEBOOK E4 series is sold in the EMEIA region and pricing starts at EUR 599 plus tax. Both are available to order immediately and are expected to ship from January 2018. LIFEBOOK models are available directly from Fujitsu, and from resellers. Models, specifications and pricing vary locally.
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14 Comments on Fujitsu Refreshes LIFEBOOK Notebook Line with New Thin, Value-Focused Models

#1
TheLostSwede
Who in their right mind would buy a Fujitsu notebook today? 10-15 years ago they were great, today, I wouldn't even bother looking at the spec.
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#3
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
TheLostSwede said:
Who in their right mind would buy a Fujitsu notebook today? 10-15 years ago they were great, today, I wouldn't even bother looking at the spec.
What's wrong with them? Apart from being boring.
Posted on Reply
#4
silentbogo
TheLostSwede said:
Who in their right mind would buy a Fujitsu notebook today? 10-15 years ago they were great, today, I wouldn't even bother looking at the spec.
At least for this: "Fujitsu has focused on making it simple to access and interchange components including memory, hard drives and connectivity components like LTE and WLAN, while batteries can be exchanged without any need to dismantle the notebook."
Plus most likely the price.
Posted on Reply
#5
PowerPC
TheLostSwede said:
Who in their right mind would buy a Fujitsu notebook today? 10-15 years ago they were great, today, I wouldn't even bother looking at the spec.
Someone who needs a notebook for work... You know, not just gaming and watching porn all day.
Posted on Reply
#6
lexluthermiester
Frick said:
What's wrong with them? Apart from being boring.
Right? Fujitsu makes solid stuff. It's only exciting if you're looking for solidly reliable, solid performing products. A lot of people and companies get excited about those qualities.
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#7
xorbe
"I'm not seeing any rgb or star wars theming, hard pass ..."
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#8
TheLostSwede
I used to be a big fan of their products and they made some really innovative products, many of which I have reviewed in the past. However, if you've seen any of their recent products, they're generic, plasticy and generally lacking in quality and innovation. If the choice was between Fujitsu and a Thinkpad (no, I wouldn't get an IdeaPad, they're just as bad) for work, I know which one I'd get.
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#9
silentbogo
TheLostSwede said:
I used to be a big fan of their products and they made some really innovative products, many of which I have reviewed in the past. However, if you've seen any of their recent products, they're generic, plasticy and generally lacking in quality and innovation. If the choice was between Fujitsu and a Thinkpad (no, I wouldn't get an IdeaPad, they're just as bad) for work, I know which one I'd get.
Except ThinkPad series got pretty bad too, and lacks all the features which made it great in the past.
T560/460 and T570/470 require you to dismount the chassis for complete access to all components.
What's even worse, is that the T470s does not even have a removable battery anymore.
x1 Carbon is a boring, heavy, overpriced ultrabook. You can get a new ASUSPRO or HP ProBook w/ identical specs and better looks for nearly half that price.
Even the older T540 only gives you access to RAM, HDD and WiFi, so in order to clean the cooling system you still need to disassemble it completely.
The quality of components is barely better than competition (especially when it comes to keyboards and screen hinges). ...and you still have to pay up +$40 for keyboard backlight option.
Posted on Reply
#10
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
There are some nice Thinkpads still, but generally they've been overrated for a very long time now. I've not touched the new Elitebooks or Zbooks from HP so my experiences are not very current, but I used to prefer those over similar Thinkpads. Even Thinkpad keyboards are overrated IMO.
Posted on Reply
#11
TheLostSwede
silentbogo said:
Except ThinkPad series got pretty bad too, and lacks all the features which made it great in the past.
T560/460 and T570/470 require you to dismount the chassis for complete access to all components.
What's even worse, is that the T470s does not even have a removable battery anymore.
x1 Carbon is a boring, heavy, overpriced ultrabook. You can get a new ASUSPRO or HP ProBook w/ identical specs and better looks for nearly half that price.
Even the older T540 only gives you access to RAM, HDD and WiFi, so in order to clean the cooling system you still need to disassemble it completely.
The quality of components is barely better than competition (especially when it comes to keyboards and screen hinges). ...and you still have to pay up +$40 for keyboard backlight option.
Well, I have an X250, so none of that is a real concern for me, but yes, you do have a point. Even so, taking off the bottom of the notebook is fairly standards these days, unfortunately. The ThinkPads are still better than most other options out there today, but it also says something about the notebook market as a whole.
Posted on Reply
#12
micropage7
i want to try it but in here it has poor after sales service, replacing battery or other components will smash me up
Posted on Reply
#13
lexluthermiester
TheLostSwede said:
I used to be a big fan of their products and they made some really innovative products, many of which I have reviewed in the past. However, if you've seen any of their recent products, they're generic, plasticy and generally lacking in quality and innovation. If the choice was between Fujitsu and a Thinkpad (no, I wouldn't get an IdeaPad, they're just as bad) for work, I know which one I'd get.
A colleague brought in one of last years Fujitsu models. While it had plastic parts, it did not feel cheap or fragile. It was actually very solid and it performed well. So based on experiences, I have to disagree, thus my above comment.
Posted on Reply
#14
3rold
TheLostSwede said:
I used to be a big fan of their products and they made some really innovative products, many of which I have reviewed in the past. However, if you've seen any of their recent products, they're generic, plasticy and generally lacking in quality and innovation. If the choice was between Fujitsu and a Thinkpad (no, I wouldn't get an IdeaPad, they're just as bad) for work, I know which one I'd get.
Yeah, well I used to be a big fan of Thinkpads til I got mine. I switched from a 3rd Gen i5 (Compaq) to 4th Gen i5 (Thinkpad E540) whilst migrating SSD and RAM and I must say, I am very disappointed. Both were 35W i5s not some 15W U counterparts and still the Compaq was much snappier while the Thinkpad gets hot, is not snappy at all, also the built in GT740M is not much faster than the HD4000, so the temp difference is not worth it.
I don't know, I wouldn't get a Thinkpad, not anymore. A couple of days ago, I brought life to a 1st gen i3 Fujitsu Lifebook with some extra RAM and an SSD and the thing flied and felt much snappier than my Thinkpad. I'd rethink that choice if I were you.
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